Congress/legislation

Looking Good by Comparison

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It's not often that National Collegiate Athletic Association officials get dragged before Congress and come out smelling like a rose. But that's what happened Thursday at a House hearing on the use of anabolic steroids in sports, and the NCAA has Major League Baseball to thank.

Members of two House of Representatives Energy and Commerce subcommittees raked baseball officials over the coals at the hearing, condemning the league repeatedly for doing too little, and too late, to uncover steroid use and to punish those found to have used the muscle-building drugs.

Senate Passes Perkins

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Moving expeditiously, the full chamber approves a vocational education bill.

Falling Behind in International Education

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A Congressional hearing suggests an easing of visa problems but a looming crisis in U.S. competitiveness.

Collision Course on the U.S. Budget

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House and Senate budget resolutions set differing directions, promising a showdown that could affect education programs.

2004 Reauthorization, Take Two

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House Republicans unveiled their proposals for renewing the law that governs federal financial aid programs, which mirror the bill introduced last year.

Professional (Lobbying) Help

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College associations have hired PricewaterhouseCoopers to help them fight for, and against, potential changes in the tax code.

Movement in the Senate

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A flurry of activity suggests Congress may make progress on extending the Higher Education Act after all.

Pressure on College Prices

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At a Congressional hearing, debate about whether federal aid drives tuition higher, and warnings for colleges.

Assessing College 'Access and Accountability'

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The numbers are bleak and -- for anyone who cares about the vibrancy of the American economy or the importance of an educated citizenry -- deeply worrisome: the United States has fallen to 17th in the world in high school graduation rates and 7th in college-going rates, and is the only industrialized country whose rates are falling.

And perhaps most troubling of all, the rates are lowest among those segments of the American populace that are growing the fastest.

Bush vs. Bankers

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There is no such thing as an offhanded comment from a White House spokesman.

So when Trent Duffy, in explaining Friday that President Bush would seek to bolster the Pell Grant program in part by reducing the subsidies paid to lenders in the student-loan program, called the subsidies "excessive" and described the loan industry as "very profitable," the political winds surrounding the student-loan programs continued to shift.

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