Career Advice

Alternate Angles

You can finish your dissertation and also get ready for non-academic careers, writes Sabine Hikel.

Hiring Outside Academe

Charles R. Middleton considers why he is increasingly appointing as senior administrators people who are coming from non-academic employers.

The Importance of Mentors

Terri Givens considers the lessons learned and confidence gained from those who encouraged her -- and her obligation to do the same for others.

I'm Sorry I Published

Ever since this piece on the hiring process in philosophy was published in Inside Higher Ed, there has been a lot of discussion about the role that pedigree should play in hiring committees' decisions about job candidates (see here, here, and

Autumn Chill

Rob Weir offers suggestions on how not to flame out like fall leaves as your stress and work levels go up -- and how to reach your students when they experience mid-semester overload.

Decentralized Work: The Final Frontier

Two decades after we were promised that telecommuting and other flexible work arrangements would be the norm, they're far from it, Justin Draeger writes. He offers guidance for how to do it right.

A Regular Writing Routine

You'll make more progress if you reject two common myths, writes Peg Boyle Single.

Conference Do's and Don't's


In my last piece, I discussed ways to think about when to start attending conferences and how to find ones that will be beneficial. This time around, I want to address what to do and what not to do once you have decided to take the plunge and go to a meeting. Below are some suggestions for how to make the most of it without sabotaging your career opportunities.

Facing a Student Complaint

After an adjunct refused to let a student leave class to take a cell call, she learned that the student would be filing a complaint, and now she's worried. C.K. Gunsalus offers some advice.

Let's Review


As many of you recall, one of the first professional tasks you undertook was to write a scholarly review of a book, article, exhibition, symposium, performance, research breakthrough, or new discovery. What we academics now do as a matter of course is use a skill we ought to teach our undergraduate and graduate students: critical engagement with secondary sources. In many respects, teaching students to think critically about work that has already been done is one of the more pragmatic things we can impart.


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