Career Advice

Views of the Classroom

Teresa Mangum discusses how to uncover your inner teaching philosophy, and how to share it with hiring committees.

The Benjamin Mays Model

The late Morehouse president provides an example of how to lead a college, with an emphasis on values and on students, writes Walter M. Kimbrough.

What the Research Says

Peg Boyle Single explains why you need to write regularly, write in the morning and get over the quest for the perfect word.

Advice for the New Administrator

Susan Resneck Pierce reviews how to learn what matters at a college, how to make decisions, how to supervise and how to inform and keep others informed.

Tools for Teleworkers

Justin Draeger describes the communication methods and gadgets that no office -- centralized or not -- should be without.

An Unfair Request

When you lack tenure, and you think a colleague with tenure is making an unethical request, how do you protect your ethics and your job? C.K. Gunsalus considers a reader's dilemma.

Those Humanities Ph.D.'s


Did you hear the one about the humanities Ph.D.?

They Don't Read!


Over the years I’ve often taught Edward Bellamy’s classic 19th century utopian novel Looking Backward. It’s a blistering critique of Gilded Age America and a creative imagining of a future in which work, social class, gender relations, and the political economy have been radically reconfigured. The novel is provocative and rich in ideas, and its premises spark great debate. What it’s not is a page-turner. Most of the book is an extended lecture interspersed with occasional questions and a contrived (and mawkish) romance.

A Writing Routine

Peg Boyle Single offers a series of practical tips.

5 Networking Strategies

Think you don't know anyone outside higher ed who can help your job search? Sabine Hikel says you do.


Subscribe to RSS - Career Advice
Back to Top