Career Advice

Producing Academic Leaders

Higher education can attract more faculty members to the administrative ranks and -- eventually -- presidencies by changing the way chairs, deans and provosts are guided, writes Susan Resneck Pierce.

Academe as Meritocracy

Maybe The Economist and other critics of Ph.D. programs that admit more students than can expect to find good academic jobs are missing the benefits of the system, writes Joshua A. Tucker.

'Congratulations, I Think'

I was elected president of our college's faculty senate last spring semester. One colleague’s response nicely captures the gist of the responses I received then:

"Congratulations, I think."

Others just gave me a look. Depending upon the cynicism index of the faculty member, it meant either "Fool!" or "Well done!"

It Shouldn't Be So Hard

After the cover letter and CV, there is probably no single criterion more critical to job candidates’ success than their ability to demonstrate collegiality. The ideal job candidate must be able to smile, make eye contact, and converse smoothly on topics ranging from her own research to her favorite light reading. He must be able to give a formal presentation of research, but also deliver a quick "elevator speech" on any aspect of that research at any moment.

Just One Question

Faculty job interviews focus on the match between candidate and institution, and Thomas Wright offers ideas for making your best case.

Why We Said No

Timothy Larsen answers the top questions he hears, as a member of a faculty search committee, from those who don't get the job.

Post-Convention Strategy

If your interviews at your disciplinary association's annual meeting didn't land you campus visits, what's next? Anna Faktorovich explores the options.

Should You Teach Online?

Chloe Yelena Miller offers advice on deciding whether to make the leap, and how to do so.

Leaving Tenure Behind

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Eliza Woolf interviews a woman who gave up tenure to focus on a career path outside academe.

It's Not Harry Potter

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We tell them, but do we show them how? I’m talking about the academic sources we implore undergraduates to consult. We toss out the word "journal" so often that we could fill one with our own references. We get histrionic about the need for "credible sources," only to read papers culled from search sources that don’t show up on Google Scholar. We rail about the need to consult "experts," but plod through papers with thoughts purloined from pop culture icons and bloggers whose rants are better-developed than their command of fact. We get frustrated.

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