Intellectual Affairs

Intellectual Affairs
November 30, 2016

Scott McLemee explores the mysteries of a centuries-old manuscript -- one that has tested, and defeated, the mental powers of numerous researchers.

November 23, 2016

The death of Scott Eric Kaufman -- an American critic and leading first-generation, graduate student blogger -- drives home the sense that this has been an especially cruel year, writes Scott McLemee.

November 16, 2016

Scott McLemee delves into The Quantified Self by Deborah Lupton, a study of how digital self-tracking is insinuating itself into every nook and cranny of human experience.

November 8, 2016

In the wake of her shocking loss, Scott McLemee analyzes close to 30 theses and dissertations that academics have written over the past several decades about Hillary Clinton.

November 2, 2016

This year’s quincentennial of Sir Thomas More’s Utopia coincides with an exceptionally spirit-blighting presidential election, making his work especially relevant, writes Scott McLemee.

October 19, 2016

How to make sense of the rash of sinister clown sightings throughout America? Scott McLemee turns to Heroes, Villains and Fools: The Changing American Character.

October 12, 2016

Scott McLemee interviews the author of a new book about the pre-eminent author and political thinker W. E. B. Du Bois, whose legacy remains highly relevant today.

October 5, 2016

While long neglected until its recent republication, Heinrich Kaan’s Psychopathia Sexualis had important implications: it treated human sexuality as entirely explicable within nature, writes Scott McLemee.

September 28, 2016

In Deciding What’s True, Lucas Graves traces how media outlets’ internal fact-checking has morphed into something almost antithetical: the very public evaluation of factual assertions made by politicians and other news figures, writes Scott McLemee.

September 21, 2016

In each of two new novels, Loner and Diary of an Oxygen Thief, it is the narrator's attitude that sticks with the reader more than the events recounted, writes Scott McLemee.

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Archive

November 30, 2016

Scott McLemee explores the mysteries of a centuries-old manuscript -- one that has tested, and defeated, the mental powers of numerous researchers.

November 23, 2016

The death of Scott Eric Kaufman -- an American critic and leading first-generation, graduate student blogger -- drives home the sense that this has been an especially cruel year, writes Scott McLemee.

November 16, 2016

Scott McLemee delves into The Quantified Self by Deborah Lupton, a study of how digital self-tracking is insinuating itself into every nook and cranny of human experience.

November 8, 2016

In the wake of her shocking loss, Scott McLemee analyzes close to 30 theses and dissertations that academics have written over the past several decades about Hillary Clinton.

November 2, 2016

This year’s quincentennial of Sir Thomas More’s Utopia coincides with an exceptionally spirit-blighting presidential election, making his work especially relevant, writes Scott McLemee.

October 19, 2016

How to make sense of the rash of sinister clown sightings throughout America? Scott McLemee turns to Heroes, Villains and Fools: The Changing American Character.

October 12, 2016

Scott McLemee interviews the author of a new book about the pre-eminent author and political thinker W. E. B. Du Bois, whose legacy remains highly relevant today.

October 5, 2016

While long neglected until its recent republication, Heinrich Kaan’s Psychopathia Sexualis had important implications: it treated human sexuality as entirely explicable within nature, writes Scott McLemee.

September 28, 2016

In Deciding What’s True, Lucas Graves traces how media outlets’ internal fact-checking has morphed into something almost antithetical: the very public evaluation of factual assertions made by politicians and other news figures, writes Scott McLemee.

September 21, 2016

In each of two new novels, Loner and Diary of an Oxygen Thief, it is the narrator's attitude that sticks with the reader more than the events recounted, writes Scott McLemee.

Pages

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