Intellectual Affairs

Intellectual Affairs
September 7, 2011
The anniversary of 9/11 is just ahead, and scholars are weighing in. Scott McLemee does a quick roundup.
August 31, 2011
A global wave of student protests has spread over the past two years. Scott McLemee looks into a new book from the barricades.
August 24, 2011
A new book discusses the power and fascination of humiliation. Scott McLemee can't look away.
August 17, 2011
A historian's thoughts on recent American religious history resonate with the campaign season. Scott McLemee looks around the paywall.
August 10, 2011

Shortly before the bombing and shooting spree in Norway last month that left 77 people dead, Anders Behring Breivik e-mailed a thousand people the document he called his “compendium” -- a more accurate label than “manifesto,” as some have called it, since large chunks of text were cut and pasted from various sources rather than composed by the murderer himself. In its opening, Breivik says he spent three years preparing the work. It runs to 1,518 pages in PDF. There is no table of contents or index. Its final pages contain a number of photographic self-portraits.

August 3, 2011

Wikipedia has been growing in authority -- and a new paper shows that scholars are studying and citing it, as well as writing for it. Scott McLemee hits "view source."

July 27, 2011
A new anthology by Generation Y writers is part survival handbook, part manifesto. Scott McLemee interviews the editor.
July 20, 2011
With e-book sales rising and Borders about to close for good, the post-print age looks closer than ever. Scott McLemee goes underground.
July 13, 2011

No one would think of the call for papers as a literary genre. But the CFP can be distinguished from the usual run of academic memoranda by its appeal to the reader’s curiosity, ambition, and capacity to daydream -- and occasionally by its test of one’s power to suspend disbelief.

July 8, 2011

Every so often, one scholar will assess another’s book so harshly that it becomes legendary. The most durable example must be A.E. Housman, whose anti-blurbs retain their sting after a century and more. Housman is best-known for the verse in his collection A Shropeshire Lad (1896). But classicists still remember his often pointed reviews of other philologists’ editions of ancient poetry, and can sometimes quote snippets from memory.

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