Intellectual Affairs

Intellectual Affairs
March 15, 2017

Scott McLemee reviews I Love My Selfie, by Ilan Stavans, which examines what the book's author calls the "business card for an emotionally attuned world."

March 8, 2017

Hitler's American Model: the United States and the Making of Nazi Race Law, by James Q. Whitman, brings into full view the U.S. Immigration Act of 1924's place in the context of Nazi theory and practice, writes Scott McLemee.

March 1, 2017

Tom Nichols devotes most of The Death of Expertise to identifying how 21st-century American life blurs the line between fact and opinion, writes Scott McLemee.

February 22, 2017

Abraham Flexner's The Usefulness of Useless Knowledge highlights how the pursuit of knowledge for its own sake has shown itself to be a powerful force in the world, writes Scott McLemee.

February 15, 2017

A new documentary and a book from Denmark point to the dangers and dead ends of the self-transformation industry, says Scott McLemee

February 8, 2017

In Light Come Shining: The Transformations of Bob Dylan, Andrew McCarron faces an excess of material about his subject, not to mention more than 50 years of investigation, speculation and exegesis by obsessive fans, writes Scott McLemee.

February 1, 2017

Scott McLemee reviews Monkeytalk: Inside the Worlds and Minds of Primates, which elucidates the two camps that have formed in the study of how intelligence evolved.

January 25, 2017

Peter J. Spiro’s At Home in Two Countries explores how globalization has turned dual citizenship from an anomalous and potentially dangerous condition into something almost commonplace, writes Scott McLemee.

January 18, 2017

Scott McLemee reviews Robert E. Denton Jr.’s scholarship on the American presidency, which highlights how immediately coping with the lack of any guidebook is one of the most urgent demands of the office.

January 11, 2017

Rob Brotherton’s Suspicious Minds illuminates how Trump’s affinity for the conspiratorial mind-set forms the bedrock of his very existence as a political figure, writes Scott McLemee.

Pages

Archive

March 15, 2017

Scott McLemee reviews I Love My Selfie, by Ilan Stavans, which examines what the book's author calls the "business card for an emotionally attuned world."

March 8, 2017

Hitler's American Model: the United States and the Making of Nazi Race Law, by James Q. Whitman, brings into full view the U.S. Immigration Act of 1924's place in the context of Nazi theory and practice, writes Scott McLemee.

March 1, 2017

Tom Nichols devotes most of The Death of Expertise to identifying how 21st-century American life blurs the line between fact and opinion, writes Scott McLemee.

February 22, 2017

Abraham Flexner's The Usefulness of Useless Knowledge highlights how the pursuit of knowledge for its own sake has shown itself to be a powerful force in the world, writes Scott McLemee.

February 15, 2017

A new documentary and a book from Denmark point to the dangers and dead ends of the self-transformation industry, says Scott McLemee

February 8, 2017

In Light Come Shining: The Transformations of Bob Dylan, Andrew McCarron faces an excess of material about his subject, not to mention more than 50 years of investigation, speculation and exegesis by obsessive fans, writes Scott McLemee.

February 1, 2017

Scott McLemee reviews Monkeytalk: Inside the Worlds and Minds of Primates, which elucidates the two camps that have formed in the study of how intelligence evolved.

January 25, 2017

Peter J. Spiro’s At Home in Two Countries explores how globalization has turned dual citizenship from an anomalous and potentially dangerous condition into something almost commonplace, writes Scott McLemee.

January 18, 2017

Scott McLemee reviews Robert E. Denton Jr.’s scholarship on the American presidency, which highlights how immediately coping with the lack of any guidebook is one of the most urgent demands of the office.

January 11, 2017

Rob Brotherton’s Suspicious Minds illuminates how Trump’s affinity for the conspiratorial mind-set forms the bedrock of his very existence as a political figure, writes Scott McLemee.

Pages

Back to Top