Intellectual Affairs

Intellectual Affairs
January 20, 2016

Hugh Pennington's new book, Have Bacteria Won?, goes straight to the heart of a growing public anxiety, writes Scott McLemee.

January 15, 2016

Celebrate or hate it as you will, writes Scott McLemee, Wikipedia has metamorphosed from its beginnings as a gangly cultural interloper into the de facto reference work of first resort.

January 6, 2016

In a new memoir, the brother of the Unabomber tries to make sense of his own past in the context of acts of violence utterly disconnected from his own memories, writes Scott McLemee.

December 16, 2015

Colin Dayan's With Dogs at the Edge of Life is the work of a mind that slips the leash of genre or narrow specialization at every opportunity, writes Scott McLemee.

December 9, 2015

Early campaigns to abolish the holiday form a largely forgotten chapter in American history, writes Scott McLemee.

December 2, 2015

A new academic book on the AMC series is a good conversation starter about the condition of "being a fan" in the everyday, typical sense, writes Scott McLemee.

November 25, 2015

How Would You Like to Pay? explores the anthropology of the expanding new world of smartphone wallets and other forms of mobile payments, writes Scott McLemee.

November 18, 2015

Two recent books give a much thicker account than daily news reports of the group behind the Paris attacks, writes Scott McLemee. But he doesn't recommend them for anyone whose nerves are easily jarred.

November 11, 2015

According to Christophe Charle's book on the topic, a debate over their definition and role has raged since the beginning, writes Scott McLemee.

November 4, 2015

Over the past century and a half or so, petroleum has been abundant and relatively easy to extract, Scott McLemee writes. The next 150 years -- in fact, the next 15 -- do not look quite so promising.

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Archive

January 20, 2016

Hugh Pennington's new book, Have Bacteria Won?, goes straight to the heart of a growing public anxiety, writes Scott McLemee.

January 15, 2016

Celebrate or hate it as you will, writes Scott McLemee, Wikipedia has metamorphosed from its beginnings as a gangly cultural interloper into the de facto reference work of first resort.

January 6, 2016

In a new memoir, the brother of the Unabomber tries to make sense of his own past in the context of acts of violence utterly disconnected from his own memories, writes Scott McLemee.

December 16, 2015

Colin Dayan's With Dogs at the Edge of Life is the work of a mind that slips the leash of genre or narrow specialization at every opportunity, writes Scott McLemee.

December 9, 2015

Early campaigns to abolish the holiday form a largely forgotten chapter in American history, writes Scott McLemee.

December 2, 2015

A new academic book on the AMC series is a good conversation starter about the condition of "being a fan" in the everyday, typical sense, writes Scott McLemee.

November 25, 2015

How Would You Like to Pay? explores the anthropology of the expanding new world of smartphone wallets and other forms of mobile payments, writes Scott McLemee.

November 18, 2015

Two recent books give a much thicker account than daily news reports of the group behind the Paris attacks, writes Scott McLemee. But he doesn't recommend them for anyone whose nerves are easily jarred.

November 11, 2015

According to Christophe Charle's book on the topic, a debate over their definition and role has raged since the beginning, writes Scott McLemee.

November 4, 2015

Over the past century and a half or so, petroleum has been abundant and relatively easy to extract, Scott McLemee writes. The next 150 years -- in fact, the next 15 -- do not look quite so promising.

Pages

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