Intellectual Affairs

Intellectual Affairs
April 6, 2016

What happens when your darkest secret or most agonizing experience can be recorded, stored, duplicated endlessly and broadcast for the world to see? Scott McLemee reviews a book on privacy in the 21st century.

March 30, 2016

Once one of the best-known authors in the world but then for many years relegated to footnotes, Stefan Zweig hardly seemed liked a figure poised for rediscovery. But not too long ago, the comeback began, writes Scott McLemee.

March 23, 2016

Scott McLemee reviews a new biography on the scholar Stanley Fish, who, if he wrote a book of career advice, could title it The Art of the Deal.

March 9, 2016

You may think of yourself as smart, a good judge of character and destined for a life better than the one you have -- but someone appealing to those feelings can end up with all your money and no known forwarding address. Scott McLemee explains.

March 2, 2016

A recent report on the cost of publishing monographs should be of some interest to many people who buy, read and/or write scholarly books, says Scott McLemee.

February 24, 2016

Scott McLemee pays tribute to the life of Umberto Eco, who had an attitude of mind condemned to tireless curiosity.

February 17, 2016

Antonin Scalia's most-cited law review article provides a glimpse into at least part of that enigmatic entity known as “the mind of the Supreme Court,” Scott McLemee writes.

February 10, 2016

Scott McLemee reviews a new anthology that documents a place in which people are condemned to psychic torture so continuous it seems eternal.

February 3, 2016

A new book reconstructs the context and mood that made Dallas a hub of far-right activism in the late 1950s and early '60s, writes Scott McLemee, shedding light on the political landscape today.

January 27, 2016

Some people lived through early discussions of postmodernism and performativity, says Scott McLemee, thinking it sounded like David Bowie, minus the genius.

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Archive

April 6, 2016

What happens when your darkest secret or most agonizing experience can be recorded, stored, duplicated endlessly and broadcast for the world to see? Scott McLemee reviews a book on privacy in the 21st century.

March 30, 2016

Once one of the best-known authors in the world but then for many years relegated to footnotes, Stefan Zweig hardly seemed liked a figure poised for rediscovery. But not too long ago, the comeback began, writes Scott McLemee.

March 23, 2016

Scott McLemee reviews a new biography on the scholar Stanley Fish, who, if he wrote a book of career advice, could title it The Art of the Deal.

March 9, 2016

You may think of yourself as smart, a good judge of character and destined for a life better than the one you have -- but someone appealing to those feelings can end up with all your money and no known forwarding address. Scott McLemee explains.

March 2, 2016

A recent report on the cost of publishing monographs should be of some interest to many people who buy, read and/or write scholarly books, says Scott McLemee.

February 24, 2016

Scott McLemee pays tribute to the life of Umberto Eco, who had an attitude of mind condemned to tireless curiosity.

February 17, 2016

Antonin Scalia's most-cited law review article provides a glimpse into at least part of that enigmatic entity known as “the mind of the Supreme Court,” Scott McLemee writes.

February 10, 2016

Scott McLemee reviews a new anthology that documents a place in which people are condemned to psychic torture so continuous it seems eternal.

February 3, 2016

A new book reconstructs the context and mood that made Dallas a hub of far-right activism in the late 1950s and early '60s, writes Scott McLemee, shedding light on the political landscape today.

January 27, 2016

Some people lived through early discussions of postmodernism and performativity, says Scott McLemee, thinking it sounded like David Bowie, minus the genius.

Pages

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