Intellectual Affairs

Intellectual Affairs
March 24, 2005

Between Baby Boomers and Generation X, between the Left and the Right, there falls ... the shadow!

March 22, 2005

Scott McLemee utters dire warnings about the cultural impact of media, while fast forwarding through commercials....

March 15, 2005

Otto Weininger's book on gender is either a masterpiece or the work of Larry Summers's evil twin. Possibly both?

March 10, 2005

Lacan, Zizek, Cornel West, Paradise Lost and Chairman Mao are all connected. Sort of....

March 8, 2005

A couple of years ago, a book appeared which might as well have had the title The Pedagogy of Zaniness. (Let's just call it that, to avoid giving it any more publicity.) The author was an academic; but more, he was also one wacky dude. And by following his instructions, you, too, could be a wacky dude, or dudette, as the case may be.

March 3, 2005

Intellectual Affairs has been running for just over a month now. It might be a good moment for a bit of housecleaning.

Readers have contacted me about some interesting developments apropos Ayn Rand, Jacques Derrida, and the history of academic freedom -- so today's column will have the element of variety going for it. Consider it a roundup of faits divers. After all, that sounds a lot more sophisticated than "news in brief."

March 1, 2005

Just because an African-American author turns out to be white doesn't mean that scholarship on her is any less creative....

February 24, 2005

When last weekend's conference at Cardozo Law was first announced, the title was given simply as "Derrida/America." Only while standing in the lobby did I learn the subtitle, "The Present State of America's Europe," from the official brochure containing the final schedule. The original title had been nagging away at my memory for several days.

February 22, 2005

Scholars gather to mourn and praise a hero to many. But was he also an influence in the Bush administration?

February 17, 2005

Fifty years after it appeared, a classic history on academic freedom seems far too timely, writes Scott McLemee.

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March 15, 2005

Otto Weininger's book on gender is either a masterpiece or the work of Larry Summers's evil twin. Possibly both?

March 10, 2005

Lacan, Zizek, Cornel West, Paradise Lost and Chairman Mao are all connected. Sort of....

March 8, 2005

A couple of years ago, a book appeared which might as well have had the title The Pedagogy of Zaniness. (Let's just call it that, to avoid giving it any more publicity.) The author was an academic; but more, he was also one wacky dude. And by following his instructions, you, too, could be a wacky dude, or dudette, as the case may be.

March 3, 2005

Intellectual Affairs has been running for just over a month now. It might be a good moment for a bit of housecleaning.

Readers have contacted me about some interesting developments apropos Ayn Rand, Jacques Derrida, and the history of academic freedom -- so today's column will have the element of variety going for it. Consider it a roundup of faits divers. After all, that sounds a lot more sophisticated than "news in brief."

March 1, 2005

Just because an African-American author turns out to be white doesn't mean that scholarship on her is any less creative....

February 24, 2005

When last weekend's conference at Cardozo Law was first announced, the title was given simply as "Derrida/America." Only while standing in the lobby did I learn the subtitle, "The Present State of America's Europe," from the official brochure containing the final schedule. The original title had been nagging away at my memory for several days.

February 22, 2005

Scholars gather to mourn and praise a hero to many. But was he also an influence in the Bush administration?

February 17, 2005

Fifty years after it appeared, a classic history on academic freedom seems far too timely, writes Scott McLemee.

February 15, 2005
Scott McLemee takes a look at something more often practiced than theorized.
February 3, 2005

"You're too young to know about the cafeterias," said Julius Jacobson.

"The cafeterias were wonderful," said Phyllis Jacobson. "There's nothing like them today."

"The cafeterias and the automats were the center of New York intellectual life back then," they continued. Each one finishing the other's thought, as old couples often will. "You'd buy a sandwich or a piece of pie, both if you could afford it, but what you really went there to do was talk."

They talked. And I listened, hoping, as ever, to be transported into their past, at least for a while.

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