Ana Dinescu

Ana Dinescu is originally from Romania and currently writes from Berlin, Germany. Ana was awarded a Ph.D. from the Faculty of History, University of Bucharest, and has a background in Political Science. She has been a journalist for ten years for Romanian daily newspapers and is currently a communications consultant and freelance author.

Besides being a regular contributor at University of Venus, she published book reviews and articles in the CEU Review of Political Science, Balkan Academic News, Journal of Tourism and Cultural Change, Reportage Online and Southeast European Politics Online, among others. She attended academic conferences and professional exchanges in the US, Vienna, Berlin, Bruxelles, Berlin and she worked for one year in Japan as communications consultant.

In 2010 she authored a chapter about The Coming «République des Lettres».The Academic World and the Web 2.0. Risks and Challenges ” in E-Research Collaboration, Springer Verlag, Germany, editor: prof. Murugan Anandarajan and in 2011 published in Romanian a book about communications in public institutions. She also translated books about Political Science from French and English into Romanian and edited books for Romanian publishing houses.

Her areas of interest are varied: Foreign Affairs and Diplomacy, Political Science, Ethnic Minorities in Central and Eastern Europe, Intellectual Histories, Public Diplomacy, Communications and Social Media. She will never resist the temptation to travel and discover new places or a new interesting book to write about.

Ana is a member of the editorial collective at University of Venus and she can be reached at

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Most Recent Articles

February 1, 2012
For more than one year, almost every two months, I enjoy writing a book review. Most of the books I am interested in cover the main issues I am focused on in my daily lectures; there are books on political science, history of Central and Eastern Europe, foreign affairs and identity, ethnic minorities and tolerance.
January 4, 2012
Long ago, when I heard or read about the huge pressure continuously faced by serious and appreciated academics to publish as much as possible (following the overused and abused slogan “publish or perish“), I was extremely surprised – if not automatically cynical. How could an academic do anything else but write?
November 23, 2011
In the last ten months, I started a long process of getting used to the idea that my Ph.D. work is over. I am (finally) done and I can do nothing more – except to start another Ph.D. on a different topic, maybe. There is no sadness, no regrets, not even the feeling of fighting an addiction; but there is one question repeated over and over again: “Now, that your Ph.D. is done, what will you do next?”
October 21, 2011
Women in the media. The latest news for the academic audience
September 15, 2011
There will never be enough words to write about libraries and my very personal encounters with their books. Beyond the family influence, the happy accidental encounters, and various events from my life; libraries are and will always be the main constant in my professional and human achievements (because I don’t see how one could develop in the absence of the other).
August 11, 2011
For some German politicians, this summer is bringing not only matters of meditation on preparing for the coming elections in September, or the need to address the home and foreign agenda, but also serious challenges for their careers. After the big scandal around the accusation of plagiarism against Karl-Theodor zu Guttenberg, the then minister of Defense and a rising star of the German politics; other politicians, many representatives of the ‘’new generation,’’ are going through comparably embarrassing days.
July 4, 2011
Let’s take one piece of e-paper, optimistically opened on your computer’s desk. This is the beginning of any contemporary relationship with your words nowadays. (Once upon a time, I was still using classic paper but I discovered that it was too time consuming while collecting my notes from the computer - and as I’m always in a big hurry - I needed a radical improvement of my time management.) And, once done with this very simple operation, I start thinking about my next academic article and look for some good inspiration.
June 7, 2011
Usually, I avoid reading and writing about star books as much as possible. As in the case of various pop stars, general and particular opinions are inevitably influenced by the ‘pros’ and ‘cons’ aired in the media, the result of ingenious PR campaigns aimed to sell. ‘Successful’ books are often evaluated in terms of sales reports and although I could appreciate a smart communication strategy aimed to increase the income of both the publisher’s house and the author, I prefer to keep myself away from the trends.
May 8, 2011
What do I stand for?We talk, write and read very often about how to we cope with this post-post-industrial fatigue of creating a right balance between our personal lives, on one side, and social and professional ambitions, on the other side. The volume of discussion does not signify that the issue has reached its limits. Rather the opposite: the diversity of experiences and the difficulty of finding universal recipes are creating infinite opportunities for reassessment.
April 7, 2011
Very often over the last five years, my friends from the academia have kept me informed about their changes of affiliation, towns, countries and continents. The contracts for their projects are limited to a couple of months or years (in the happiest scenario), and in-between projects they are on high alert for securing their next professional step: tensed months of job hunting, preparations and hopes for interviews, documenting and writing new projects (at times in areas of research they are not familiar with, but with high chances to benefit from proper funding).


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