Carl Straumsheim

Carl Straumsheim, Technology Correspondent, joined Inside Higher Ed in 2013. He got his start in journalism as a video game blogger for Norway's third largest paper, Dagbladet, at age 15, and has since dabbled in media criticism, investigative reporting and political coverage. Straumsheim (pronounced STROMS-hyme) boasts that he once received a perfect score on the Test of English as a Foreign Language, which enabled him to pursue a bachelor's degree in English from LaGrange College and a master's degree in journalism from the University of Maryland at College Park.

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Most Recent Articles

March 24, 2017
Arizona State, known for rejecting norms of traditional campuses, will invest more than $100 million in its library, seeking to serve the campus and a growing online student body.
March 21, 2017
U of Maryland University College pursues a strategy of spinning off units into stand-alone companies, seeking financial gain for itself and affordable tuition rates for its students.
March 20, 2017
Internet speeds at colleges have nearly tripled since 2012 as IT departments have fought to keep up with students bringing new internet-connected devices to campus, streaming music and video, and gaming online, a new study found. ACUTA (the Association for College and University Technology Advancement) and the Association of College and University Housing Officers International surveyed administrators at 320 colleges and universities in the U.S.
March 20, 2017
Despite the buzz, competency-based education remains a challenging market for software vendors.
March 17, 2017
Investigation found that staff members improperly handled financial aid funds and changed student grades.
March 17, 2017
The Association of American Universities, the Association of Research Libraries and the Association of American University Presses will later this spring launch a joint initiative to support open-access monograph publishing.
March 14, 2017
Institutions say they will not follow in Berkeley’s footsteps and delete publicly available educational content.
March 13, 2017
Concordia University in Montreal will buy five copies each of five books it mistakenly digitized and made available for free, The Globe and Mail reported. The university's Centre for Expanded Poetics had digitized the books in an effort to save students some money on course materials, but it had not obtained the necessary permissions to do so.
March 8, 2017
Smaller institutions report an increase in sophisticated attempts to gain access to financial and personal information.
March 7, 2017
Issues are being brought to the forefront as education becomes more digital. Inside Higher Ed profiles a Ph.D. student as she designs her first online course.

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