Colleen Flaherty

Colleen Flaherty, Reporter, covers faculty issues for Inside Higher Ed. Prior to joining the publication in 2012, Colleen was military editor at The Killeen Daily Herald, outside Fort Hood, Texas. She also has covered government and land use issues for newspapers in her home state of Connecticut. After graduating from McGill University in Montreal in 2005 with a degree in English literature, Colleen taught English and English as a second language in public schools in the Bronx, N.Y. She earned her M.S.Ed. from City University of New York Lehman College in 2008.

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Most Recent Articles

September 29, 2016
After controversial remarks about reproduction at one conference and gay people at another, scholarly groups consider whether they have an obligation to apologize for what was said or whether doing so constitutes censorship.
September 29, 2016
Survey of presidents and trustees shows they value relationships with faculty members and want to improve them, but within some limits.
September 28, 2016
New series of grants seek to help institutions embed Reacting to the Past and other high-impact teaching practices in the undergraduate curriculum.
September 28, 2016
The University of Tennessee at Knoxville will not punish a professor of law and well-known conservative blogger for his controversial tweet about the recent Charlotte, N.C., protests. Melanie D. Wilson, dean of Tennessee’s law school, said last week that she was investigating Glenn Reynolds's suggestion that motorists “run down” protesters blocking traffic.
September 27, 2016
Gatekeeper or rubber stamp? Recent tenure denial raises questions about a president's role in tenure decisions.
September 26, 2016
Hundreds of University of Minnesota students walked out of classes and rallied at the Twin Cities campus Friday in support
September 23, 2016
U of Tennessee investigates professor and popular conservative blogger for tweeting that drivers should "run down" protesters in North Carolina.
September 22, 2016
Gender-based discrimination in the academic workplace isn’t always overt, but the “shrapnel” of small indignities stays with you. That’s the premise of a new book on this kind of bias, and how to alleviate it.
September 22, 2016
Lafayette College has reaffirmed its decision to deny tenure to Juan Rojo, the assistant professor of Spanish who launched a hunger strike after being denied tenure last month. Rojo, who has since ended his strike, had asked Lafayette’s Board of Trustees to reconsider his case, as three faculty panels endorsed his tenure bid before President Alison Byerly rejected it.
September 21, 2016
New study adds to evidence that student reviews of professors have limited validity.

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February 26, 2015
Large-scale walkouts were few during National Adjunct Walkout Day, but dozens of campuses saw protests. Organizers say events brought new attention to poor wages and working conditions for those off the tenure track.
January 2, 2014
Judge upholds new Florida rules that would link evaluation of professors to such factors as learning gains and job placement.  
October 25, 2013
Oct. 25, 2013 -- Inside Higher Ed's 2013 Survey of College and University Human Resources Officers explored the views of chief human resources officers on wellness-related penalties, adjuncts and health care, and ignorance about retirement, among other topics. The survey was conducted in conjunction with researchers from Gallup. Inside Higher Ed regularly surveys key higher ed professionals on a range of topics. A copy of the report can be downloaded here. On Nov. 13, Inside Higher Ed conducted a free webinar to discuss the results of the survey. Editor Doug Lederman and Sabrina Ellis of George Washington University analyzed the findings and answered readers' questions. To view the webinar, please click here. The Inside Higher Ed survey of chief HR officers was made possible in part by advertising from TIAA-CREF.
November 20, 2012
At one community college, the national health-care law would have assured adjuncts access to health insurance, but the institution is cutting their hours to avoid the requirement.
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