Conditionally Accepted

Conditionally Accepted

Many individuals are drawn to higher education, including academic careers, because of academe’s potential for change. Countless prospective and current graduate students note that their desire to make a difference in their communities or society in general was their primary decision to attend graduate training. Unfortunately, many colleges and universities in the U.S. have practiced outright discrimination and exclusion throughout history, particularly against women, people of color, and disabled people/people with disabilities. 

Today, academe — like every social institution — is structured hierarchically, producing numerous professional and personal obstacles for academics from marginalized backgrounds. Scholars who are women, of color, lesbian, trans, bisexual, gay, queer, disabled, working-class or poor, immigrants, fat, religious and non-religious minorities, and/or single parents are faced daily with the difficult tension between academe's narrow definition of success and their own politics, identities, needs, happiness, and health.

Conditionally Accepted was created as a freestanding blog in July 2013 as an online space for scholars on the margins of academe. It has steadily grown since, becoming a career advice column for Inside Higher Ed in January 2016.  In this column, we provide news, information, personal stories, and resources for scholars who are, at best, conditionally accepted in academe. Conditionally Accepted is an anti-racist, pro-feminist, pro-queer, anti-transphobic, anti-fatphobic, anti-ableist, anti-ageist, anti-classist, and anti-xenophobic online community.

You can also like us on Facebook here and follow us on Twitter @conditionaccept.

 

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Conditionally Accepted Archive

November 12, 2021

Documenting the pandemic’s effect, especially on women faculty and those of color, is vital, write Donna Riley and Mangala Subramaniam, who offer advice on how to assess such statements.

October 29, 2021

While such methods are often considered value-free and unbiased, we must recognize how our classroom practices can reinforce oppressive ideologies and narratives, writes Kamden K. Strunk.

October 15, 2021

Emily Skop, Martina Angela Caretta, Caroline Faria and Jessi L. Smith offer other scholars engaged in research collaborations a pledge to help foster and sustain more equitable relationships.

August 27, 2021

Inadequately citing or entirely omitting the scholarship of women and people of color reflects the larger problem of entrenched marginalization in the academy, write 12 women scholars.

August 13, 2021

Elena A. Miranda highlights the actions and behaviors of gatekeepers who hold the power to make or break careers and perpetuate the disenfranchisement of women and people of color.

July 30, 2021

Simply hiring a chief diversity officer will never lead to success if we don’t take three key steps to infuse diversity, equity and inclusion efforts into the fabric of our institutions, argues Kendall D. Isaac.

July 2, 2021

We are stepping into an environment where the stakes for defending the democratic university and the institution of tenure itself are arguably higher than ever, argues Megan A. Carney.

June 18, 2021

Wendi Williams provides advice for how institutions can acknowledge and lessen the disproportionate amount of emotional labor that Black, Indigenous and people of color faculty perform.

May 28, 2021

Kimberly A. Truong describes how her institution has taken a key step toward acknowledging the invisible labor of faculty of color -- and why others should do so as well.

May 14, 2021

Jia Zheng and Jalah Townsend share some key strategies to help higher education institutions retain faculty who are Black, Indigenous and women of color.

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