Conditionally Accepted

Conditionally Accepted

Many individuals are drawn to higher education, including academic careers, because of academe’s potential for change. Countless prospective and current graduate students note that their desire to make a difference in their communities or society in general was their primary decision to attend graduate training. Unfortunately, many colleges and universities in the U.S. have practiced outright discrimination and exclusion throughout history, particularly against women, people of color, and disabled people/people with disabilities. 

Today, academe — like every social institution — is structured hierarchically, producing numerous professional and personal obstacles for academics from marginalized backgrounds. Scholars who are women, of color, lesbian, trans, bisexual, gay, queer, disabled, working-class or poor, immigrants, fat, religious and non-religious minorities, and/or single parents are faced daily with the difficult tension between academe's narrow definition of success and their own politics, identities, needs, happiness, and health.

Conditionally Accepted was created as a freestanding blog in July 2013 as an online space for scholars on the margins of academe. It has steadily grown since, becoming a career advice column for Inside Higher Ed in January 2016.  In this column, we provide news, information, personal stories, and resources for scholars who are, at best, conditionally accepted in academe. Conditionally Accepted is an anti-racist, pro-feminist, pro-queer, anti-transphobic, anti-fatphobic, anti-ableist, anti-ageist, anti-classist, and anti-xenophobic online community.

You can also like us on Facebook here and follow us on Twitter @conditionaccept.

 

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Conditionally Accepted Archive

January 4, 2019

It challenges the status quo, crosses boundaries and breaks new ground, writes Eric Anthony Grollman, and we should honor and acknowledge it.

December 21, 2018

Alvaro Huerta honors a deceased Latino professor, a pioneer and mentor in his field, and highlights the need for more like him.

December 14, 2018

Seemingly consensual relationships are not truly so when power differentials are vast, argues an anonymous Ph.D. student.

November 30, 2018

Larissa M. Mercado-López offers advice for how faculty members can better support student who are parents as well as those who are caregivers in other ways.

November 16, 2018

With academic freedom and free speech under attack, we should see calls for civility for what they are: attempts to silence the messenger, write Johnny E. Williams and David G. Embrick.

November 9, 2018

Myron Strong provides tips on how academics can take more active roles in their disciplines.

November 2, 2018

Alicia M. Reyes-Barriéntez offers strategies that individual professors can use to teach them effectively.

October 26, 2018

Jessica Welburn Paige outlines what faculty members who are not members of underrepresented groups can do to become more engaged in diversity and inclusion efforts.

October 12, 2018

Academics must help create affirming educational experiences for trans* students before they show up in our classrooms, writes Z Nicolazzo.

October 5, 2018

What’s the point of employing feminist pedagogy, asks Christine M. Nowik, if we don't explain what it is?

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