Conditionally Accepted

Conditionally Accepted

Many individuals are drawn to higher education, including academic careers, because of academe’s potential for change. Countless prospective and current graduate students note that their desire to make a difference in their communities or society in general was their primary decision to attend graduate training. Unfortunately, many colleges and universities in the U.S. have practiced outright discrimination and exclusion throughout history, particularly against women, people of color, and disabled people/people with disabilities. 

Today, academe — like every social institution — is structured hierarchically, producing numerous professional and personal obstacles for academics from marginalized backgrounds. Scholars who are women, of color, lesbian, trans, bisexual, gay, queer, disabled, working-class or poor, immigrants, fat, religious and non-religious minorities, and/or single parents are faced daily with the difficult tension between academe's narrow definition of success and their own politics, identities, needs, happiness, and health.

Conditionally Accepted was created as a freestanding blog in July 2013 as an online space for scholars on the margins of academe. It has steadily grown since, becoming a career advice column for Inside Higher Ed in January 2016.  In this column, we provide news, information, personal stories, and resources for scholars who are, at best, conditionally accepted in academe. Conditionally Accepted is an anti-racist, pro-feminist, pro-queer, anti-transphobic, anti-fatphobic, anti-ableist, anti-ageist, anti-classist, and anti-xenophobic online community.

You can also like us on Facebook here and follow us on Twitter @conditionaccept.

 

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Conditionally Accepted Archive

July 24, 2020

If the pandemic has interrupted your scholarly writing, this could be the time to explore other genres or to seek coaching or other forms of support, Christina Lux and Tanya Golash-Boza advise.

July 17, 2020

Sarah Manchanda critiques the reinforcing roles race and gender can play in the institutional othering of disability.

July 10, 2020

Reshmi Dutt-Ballerstadt pens a satirical memo.

June 26, 2020

Many faculty of color work with people operating outside the lines of fair disagreements, yet colleges too frequently are more than willing to simply ignore the situation, argues Anthony Rodriguez.

June 19, 2020

Courtney N. Wright asks, why aren't more administrators who say they support diversity, equity and inclusion initiatives reaching out to their black colleagues now?

June 12, 2020

What has not been acknowledged is the world of terror enveloping many black academics that has changed feeling tired to absolute exhaustion, Henrika McCoy writes.

May 29, 2020

We call on ourselves as scholars to engage a wider audience in our work, but we must acknowledge the risks and consequences some of us face for doing so, write Laurie Cooper Stoll and Darci L. Thoune.

May 22, 2020

Keisha N. Blain shares some tips, strategies and resources to help midcareer scholars overcome barriers to promotion.

May 15, 2020

Especially given the demographics, asks Alvaro Huerta, why shouldn't colleges require students to learn about others' histories, struggles and successes in this country?

May 8, 2020

My experiences during a pandemic are far from business as usual, writes Abiola Farinde-Wu. In fact, I carry a complex and challenging workload by virtue of my race and gender.

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