Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

January 14, 2015
Hugh Brady, professor of medicine and healthcare strategy and president emeritus at University College Dublin, in Ireland, has been appointed as vice chancellor and president of the University of Bristol, in England.
January 13, 2015
Students who received privately funded scholarships were more likely than similarly qualified peers who did not to enroll in four-year rather than two-year colleges and to remain enrolled into their second year, according to a randomized study described in a paper from the National Bureau of Economic Research.
January 13, 2015
Duke University ignored a graduate student's warnings about possible misconduct in the lab of a cancer researcher, years before the case exploded into public view, The Cancer Letter reported. The newsletter published documents showing that a medical student, Bradford Perez, tried to inform campus administrators about statistical anomalies in studies produced in the lab of Anil Potti, a cancer researcher. But university officials discouraged Perez from filing a formal complaint, the newsletter reported.
January 12, 2015
You’ll be amazed at what you hear when you listen closely. In today's Academic Minute, Cornell University's Kim Haines-Eitzen analyzes educational depth of acoustic soundscapes.
January 12, 2015
Can your past sexual partners influence the genetics of your children? In today's Academic Minute, the University of New South Wales's Angela Crean profiles telegony.
January 9, 2015
On our Jan. 9 program, the labor expert William A. Herbert and the University of Arizona's Gary Rhoades join Inside Higher Ed's Scott Jaschik and the moderator Casey Green to discuss the implications of the National Labor Relations Board's December ruling, for higher ed collective bargaining generally and for faculty unions at private nonprofit colleges in particular.
January 9, 2015
A website formed to crowdfund payments to former college athletes has begun collecting live contributions, despite attempts from colleges and conferences to shut it down, CBS Sports reported.
January 9, 2015
North Dakota legislators introduced a bill Thursday that would let accused students be represented by a lawyer in campus judicial hearings, InForum reported. The legislation would grant students in disciplinary hearings that did not involve academic misconduct the right to pay for their own representative; student organizations would have a similar right.
January 9, 2015
An instructor at a Nova Scotia university resigned his position Thursday after admitting to having had a sexual relationship with a student he met during an online course, MetroNews reported. Michael Kydd, who teaches business part time at Mount Saint Vincent University, in Halifax, acknowledged at a news conference that the relationship -- which he described as consensual -- violated the university's code of conduct.
January 9, 2015
Time again for Inside Higher Ed's Cartoon Caption Contest. Click here to suggest a caption for this month's cartoon. You can vote here for your favorite among the three captions chosen by our panel of judges as the cleverest submitted for last month's cartoon.

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