Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

March 1, 2016
You may know your morning routine like the back of your hand, but some people struggle with ordinary tasks. In today's Academic Minute, Brown University's David Badre says that examining how the brain puts tasks in the right order can help people who have difficulty with day-to-day routines.
March 1, 2016
Today on the Academic Minute, David Badre, associate professor in the department of cognitive, linguistic and psychological sciences at Brown University, determines that examining how the brain puts tasks in the right order can help people who have difficulty with day-to-day routines. Find out more about the Academic Minute here.
February 29, 2016
Ski resorts aren’t the only ones that depend on a good base of snow in the winter. In today's Academic Minute, Columbia University's Justin Mankin describes how a changing climate may change the way cultures get their water in the spring and summer.
February 29, 2016
Today on the Academic Minute, Justin Mankin, a postdoctoral fellow at Columbia University, describes how a changing climate may change the way cultures get their water in the spring and summer. Find out more about the Academic Minute here.
February 26, 2016
The U.S. Justice Department on Wednesday charged a professor at Washington State University and two family members with defrauding federal agencies of $8 million in research funds for their personal use.
February 26, 2016
This month's edition of The Pulse podcast features an interview with Victor Yocco, a design researcher and author.
February 26, 2016
This month's edition of the 'Pulse' podcast features an interview with Victor Yocco, a design researcher and author.
February 26, 2016
How did giraffes get such long necks? In today's Academic Minute, New York Institute of Technology's Nikos Solounias explores the evolution of this iconic feature.
February 26, 2016
Today on the Academic Minute, Nikos Solounias, professor of anatomy at the New York Institute of Technology, explains the evolution of the long-necked animal's iconic feature.
February 25, 2016
The definition of purity doesn’t change across cultures, but ideas about the processes of purification do. In today's Academic Minute, the University of Toronto's Spike W. S. Lee examines how different cultures consider purity … and morality.

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