Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

January 26, 2015
Bullying has never been limited to the schoolyard. In today's Academic Minute, Iowa State University's Stacy Tye-Williams sheds some light on bullying as it occurs in the professional arena.
January 23, 2015
On our Jan. 23 program, the Urban Institute's Sandy Baum and Jennifer Wang of Young Invincibles join Inside Higher Ed's Scott Jaschik and This Week moderator Casey Green for a discussion of the higher ed proposals in President Obama's State of the Union speech and his agenda for 2015. In our second segment, Debra Humphreys of the Association of American Colleges and Universities analyzes her group's new report on an apparent disconnect between employers and graduates about how well colleges prepare students for the workforce.
January 23, 2015
There's a lot of stuff happening in the human gut! In today's Academic Minute, the Scripps Research Institute's Dennis Wolan explains his work with the microbiotic enzymes to better understand our bodies and hopefully treat disease.
January 22, 2015
Nuclear disasters, naturally, affect the life in the surrounding areas. In today's Academic Minute, the University of South Carolina's Timothy Mousseau explores Chernobyl and Fukushima to see how far the radioactive damage may go.
January 22, 2015
The 2011 decision to end a short-lived program that let students earn two Pell Grants in a single academic year was blamed on a range of factors, including that the program's costs raged out of control and that it failed to encourage students to finish their degrees more quickly.
January 21, 2015
                                                                                         Jan. 21, 2015 To our readers: Some of you may have seen some recent blog posts and discussion on Twitter or elsewhere about Inside Higher Ed Inc.'s ownership status. We wanted you to have more information directly from us.
January 20, 2015
Do outside factors influence evolution? In today's Academic Minute, the University of Texas at Austin's Yoel Stuart describes a species of lizard that is very quick to adapt.
January 19, 2015
What can we tell from the face? There is mixed data, but some show a pretty strong coherence between what is felt and what is expressed. In today's Academic Minute, Skidmore College's Lawrence Ian Reed profiles the implications of facial expressions.
January 19, 2015
The University of North Carolina's Board of Governors announced Friday that Thomas G. Ross would leave his job as the system's president early next year, and its failure to explain the reasons for Ross's departure prompted assertions that he was forced out. Ross was appointed president in 2010, just as Republicans first began making significant gains in North Carolina's traditionally Democratically controlled legislature.
January 16, 2015
On our Jan. 16 program, Gail Mellow of LaGuardia Community College and Robert Kelchen of Seton Hall University join Inside Higher Ed's Scott Jaschik and "This Week" moderator Casey Green to analyze the Obama administration's proposal to make community college free nationally. And in our other segment, two former college presidents and foundation officials, William G. Bowen and Eugene M. Tobin, discuss their recent book urging a reboot of academic governance.

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