Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

June 16, 2016
Charlene S. Aaron, assistant professor at Illinois State University’s Mennonite College of Nursing, has been selected as chancellor at St. John's College of Nursing, also in Illinois. Jennifer Lindon, dean of occupational technologies/workforce solutions at Hazard Community and Technical College, in Kentucky, has been promoted to president there.
June 16, 2016
The service the U.S. Education Department provides to student loan borrowers is "poor" in several areas and needs significant improvement, the U.S. Government Accountability Office said in a report Wednesday. The report found limitations in borrowers' access to federal service call centers, the department's complaint tracking and other areas, and made a series of recommendations aimed at improving the situation.
June 15, 2016
Does a bad economy lead to civil unrest or is it vice versa? In today's Academic Minute, the University of East Anglia's Christa Brunnschweiler determines which comes first.
June 15, 2016
Today on the Academic Minute, Christa Brunnschweiler, senior lecturer in economics at the University of East Anglia, discusses whether a bad economy leads to civil unrest or vice versa. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.
June 15, 2016
Increased federal funding for agricultural research will bolster the economy, improve nutrition and food safety, protect public health, and strengthen the environment, officials of 13 universities argue in a new report. The report, "Retaking the Field: The Case for a Surge in Agricultural Research," is backed by the Supporters of Agricultural Research (SoAR) Foundation and includes case studies of work done by the mix of public and private research universities.
June 14, 2016
Have we found the fingerprints of the first group of stars in our universe? In today's Academic Minute, St. Michael’s College’s John O’Meara explores how looking 12 billion years in the past can lead to a better understanding of the full story of the cosmos.
June 14, 2016
Today on the Academic Minute, John O’Meara, associate professor of physics at St. Michael’s College, explores how looking 12 billion years in the past can lead to a better understanding of the full story of the cosmos. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.
June 13, 2016
When a federal panel weighs whether to keep recognizing an overseer of for-profit colleges this month, the feds and the accreditor alike will be judged on the outcome.
June 13, 2016
Self-driving cars could have some positive and negative environmental factors. In today's Academic Minute, the University of Washington's Don MacKenzie explores how making transportation easier could lead to even more people getting on the road.
June 13, 2016
Today on the Academic Minute, Don MacKenzie, assistant professor of transportation engineering at the University of Washington, explores how making transportation easier could lead to even more people getting on the road. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

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