Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

January 27, 2016
“The Rise of Competency-Based Education” is Inside Higher Ed's new compilation of articles. This print-on-demand booklet is free and you may download a copy here.
January 27, 2016
Our country’s annual medical bill for treating anxiety is huge. In today's Academic Minute, the University of Illinois's Florin Dolcos explains a discovery that may trigger a new treatment for the millions of American suffering from this affliction.
January 27, 2016
As charitable donations to higher education soar to a new record high, the richest institutions continue to distance themselves from the rest.
January 26, 2016
Reducing heart failures in the U.S. could save millions of people. In today's Academic Minute, New York Institute of Technology's Martin Gerdes delves into a new treatment that could help us live longer and better lives.
January 25, 2016
Hitting the gym can pump up your muscles -- and also your skeleton. In today's Academic Minute, the University of North Carolina's Janet Rubin explains that exercise can determine whether stem cells become bone or fat.
January 22, 2016
The Association of American Universities is urging Congress to overturn a ban on federal funding of health-related research about gun violence. The research university group said in a statement: "While there can be honest disagreement about the most effective means of addressing gun violence, there should be no doubt that, like any other public health issue, the more we know about causes, about trends and about potential remedies, the stronger basis we will have for effective action."
January 22, 2016
Being more self-involved may also mean being more empathetic. In today's Academic Minute, the University of Missouri's Brick Johnstone discusses his research into empathy and self-awareness.
January 21, 2016
Are you thinking of popping the question soon? In today's Academic Minute, the University of Toronto's Ann Bowers examines how the story attached to a diamond may move the price more than the 4 C’s.
January 21, 2016
Charlotte Borst, vice president for academic affairs and dean of faculty at Whittier College, in California, has been chosen as president of the College of Idaho. Kenneth G. Gormley, dean of the law school at Duquesne University, in Pennsylvania, has been selected as president there.
January 21, 2016
This month's edition of “The Pulse” podcast features a recent presentation made by Alex Freeman, one of the authors of the annual Higher Education Horizon Report from the New Media Consortium.

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April 2, 2007
Some institutions accept N.Y. attorney general's settlement offer to change student loan practices and repay disputed funds.
March 9, 2007
A House of Representatives subcommittee lambasted college leaders Thursday for their perceived failure in stemming the illegal downloading of music and movies by students. Committee members, responding to complaints by the entertainment industry that campuses have been slow to restrict copyright infringement, pressed for answers and made vague threats about possible changes in intellectual property law that could result if higher education as a whole does not adopt a more aggressive approach.
February 1, 2007
The U.S. House of Representatives approved legislation Wednesday that would raise the value of the maximum Pell Grant for the first time since 2002 and increase spending for several key academic research programs. Dozens of Republicans joined all but two Democrats in voting for House Joint Resolution 20, which would finance the operations of much of the federal government through the rest of the 2007 fiscal year, which began in October.
January 31, 2007
At meeting of accreditors, officials acknowledge need to measure student learning, but fear oversimplification.

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