Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

January 11, 2017
Was status always important to men? In today’s Academic Minute, the University of Richmond’s Christopher von Rueden explores whether hunter-gatherers cared as much as modern men about their status among the tribe.
January 11, 2017
Today on the Academic Minute, Christopher von Rueden, assistant professor of leadership studies at the University of Richmond, details whether hunter-gatherers cared as much as modern men about their status among the tribe. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.
January 10, 2017
How do you reduce infections in hospitals? In today's Academic Minute, Grinnell College's Shannon Hinsa-Leasure explores whether changing the surfaces you touch may have a benefit.
January 10, 2017
Today on the Academic Minute, Shannon Hinsa-Leasure, associate professor of biology at Grinnell College, explores whether changing the surfaces you touch may have a health benefit. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.
January 9, 2017
The U.S. base at Guantánamo Bay remains controversial. In today's Academic Minute, the University of Miami's Christina Frohock discusses the base from a legal perspective.
January 9, 2017
Today on the Academic Minute, Christina Frohock, professor of legal writing at the University of Miami School of Law, discusses the U.S. base at Guantánamo from a legal perspective. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.
January 6, 2017
Social justice concerns have been ever-present in the news. In today's Academic Minute, Louisiana State University's Lori Martin discusses the issues that continue to divide the country.
January 6, 2017
Today on the Academic Minute, Lori Martin, associate professor in the department of sociology and African-American studies at Louisiana State University, discusses the issues that continue to divide the country. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.
January 6, 2017
A state audit found that several Missouri universities took advantage of ambiguous rules governing the state's performance-based funding system to derive more money by changing the benchmarks used to measure them, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch reported. The audit said the program's rules need to be clarified but did not blame the universities for taking advantage of the situation.
January 5, 2017
This month's episode of The Pulse podcast features an interview with A.W. (Tony) Bates, distinguished visiting professor at Ryerson University and CEO of Tony Bates Associates.

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January 19, 2009
Overshadowing other news from the NCAA convention, Myles Brand publicly confirms illness and describes his long-term prognosis as "not good."
December 10, 2008
Regional association cites Alabama A&M and Webber International for financial shortcomings, lifts sanction against Texas Tech, and says Virginia Commonwealth has responded adequately to scandal.
July 12, 2007
At financial aid directors' meeting, sessions explore best practices on student financial literacy and assess 2 new federal aid programs.
May 23, 2007
Congress seems poised to expand tuition tax breaks for students, but will colleges be taxed more to pay for them?
April 2, 2007
Some institutions accept N.Y. attorney general's settlement offer to change student loan practices and repay disputed funds.
March 9, 2007
A House of Representatives subcommittee lambasted college leaders Thursday for their perceived failure in stemming the illegal downloading of music and movies by students. Committee members, responding to complaints by the entertainment industry that campuses have been slow to restrict copyright infringement, pressed for answers and made vague threats about possible changes in intellectual property law that could result if higher education as a whole does not adopt a more aggressive approach.
February 1, 2007
The U.S. House of Representatives approved legislation Wednesday that would raise the value of the maximum Pell Grant for the first time since 2002 and increase spending for several key academic research programs. Dozens of Republicans joined all but two Democrats in voting for House Joint Resolution 20, which would finance the operations of much of the federal government through the rest of the 2007 fiscal year, which began in October.
January 31, 2007
At meeting of accreditors, officials acknowledge need to measure student learning, but fear oversimplification.

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