Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

To reach this person, click here.

Most Recent Articles

June 22, 2015
Remember the hysteria related to Y2K? In today's Academic Minute, the University of Surrey’s Radu Sporea profiles a very similar issue we may face in 2038.
June 20, 2015
Sweet Briar College lives on.
June 19, 2015
Dennis Bona, president of Kellogg Community College, in Michigan, has been appointed president of Northland Community and Technical College, part of the Minnesota State Colleges and Universities system. Nancy Brickhouse, deputy provost for academic affairs at the University of Delaware, has been named provost at Saint Louis University, in Missouri.
June 19, 2015
There’s a very limited chance you’ve heard of the Madden-Julian Oscillation. In today's Academic Minute, Columbia University's Adam Sobel details this phenomenon known better by its acronym, the MJO.
June 18, 2015
U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill told a group of college athletics officials Wednesday that while she appreciated the progress they had made in combating sexual assault, college athletes are still too often protected "from the consequences of their behavior," USA Today reported.
June 18, 2015
The official who has driven the U.S. Consumer Finance Protection Bureau's increasingly aggressive scrutiny of student loans and for-profit higher education is leaving the agency. Rohit Chopra, the new agency's first student loan ombudsman, said in a letter the Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew that he would depart next week after four years of work to "assist borrowers, promote transparency, and hold accountable those who break the law."
June 18, 2015
Networking with your colleagues can be an onerous task. In today's Academic Minute, the University of Toronto's Tiziana Casciaro discusses the nature of networking and the resultant feelings.
June 17, 2015
House spending bill would block rating system, gainful employment and other regulations, provide funding increases for NIH and TRIO programs.
June 17, 2015
The new president of the University of Texas at Austin said Tuesday that he would commission an independent review of the academic services the Longhorn sports programs provide to athletes, in the wake of a highly critical news report alleging that players received improper academic help.
June 17, 2015
What can gestational diabetes tell us? In today's Academic Minute, Lisa Chasan-Taber of the University of Massachusetts at Amherst discusses how the condition manifests itself later in life.

Pages

Co-Authored Articles

April 2, 2007
Some institutions accept N.Y. attorney general's settlement offer to change student loan practices and repay disputed funds.
March 9, 2007
A House of Representatives subcommittee lambasted college leaders Thursday for their perceived failure in stemming the illegal downloading of music and movies by students. Committee members, responding to complaints by the entertainment industry that campuses have been slow to restrict copyright infringement, pressed for answers and made vague threats about possible changes in intellectual property law that could result if higher education as a whole does not adopt a more aggressive approach.
February 1, 2007
The U.S. House of Representatives approved legislation Wednesday that would raise the value of the maximum Pell Grant for the first time since 2002 and increase spending for several key academic research programs. Dozens of Republicans joined all but two Democrats in voting for House Joint Resolution 20, which would finance the operations of much of the federal government through the rest of the 2007 fiscal year, which began in October.
January 31, 2007
At meeting of accreditors, officials acknowledge need to measure student learning, but fear oversimplification.

Pages

Back to Top