Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

April 27, 2016
In today's Academic Minute, the University of Texas at Austin's Andrew Ellington explains how microscopic machines may be the key to defeating this disease.
April 27, 2016
Today on the Academic Minute, Andrew Ellington, professor in the department of molecular biosciences at the University of Texas at Austin, explains how microscopic machines may be the key to defeating cancer.
April 26, 2016
A federal appeals court on Monday issued a straightforward ruling rejecting a former student's lawsuit accusing Southern Methodist University of breaching its obligation to treat him fairly. While the appeals panel's conclusion may be perfectly sound legal theory, its core finding -- that "Texas law does not impose a duty of good faith and fair dealing in the student-university relationship" -- probably wouldn't be how most institutions would market themselves to students.
April 26, 2016
If ethanol consumption is known to be toxic, why have humans consumed it throughout history? In today's Academic Minute, Santa Fe College's Matthew Carrigan discusses this paradox.
April 26, 2016
Today on the Academic Minute: Matthew Carrigan, professor of biology at Santa Fe College, discusses a paradox -- ethanol consumption is known to be toxic, but humans have consumed it throughout history. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.
April 25, 2016
“The Critical Role of General Education” is Inside Higher Ed's newest print-on-demand compilation of articles. This compilation, which contains articles and essays on institutional experiments with general education and other topics, is free, and you may download a copy here.
April 25, 2016
How much do you know about landfills? In today's Academic Minute, Binghamton University's Joshua Reno explains how becoming more aware of where our trash goes might be a good way to start reducing it.
April 25, 2016
Today on the Academic Minute, Joshua Reno, assistant professor of anthropology at Binghamton University, details how becoming more aware of where our trash goes might be a good way to start reducing it. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.
April 22, 2016
The ASU GSV Summit, where investors and start-ups frolic, welcomes more educators and focuses more on working with higher ed than on conquering it.
April 22, 2016
Was Shakespeare a plagiarist? In today's Academic Minute, Thomas Olsen of the State University of New York at New Paltz discusses how the fabled author remixed others’ work to create his masterpieces.

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May 23, 2007
Congress seems poised to expand tuition tax breaks for students, but will colleges be taxed more to pay for them?
April 2, 2007
Some institutions accept N.Y. attorney general's settlement offer to change student loan practices and repay disputed funds.
March 9, 2007
A House of Representatives subcommittee lambasted college leaders Thursday for their perceived failure in stemming the illegal downloading of music and movies by students. Committee members, responding to complaints by the entertainment industry that campuses have been slow to restrict copyright infringement, pressed for answers and made vague threats about possible changes in intellectual property law that could result if higher education as a whole does not adopt a more aggressive approach.
February 1, 2007
The U.S. House of Representatives approved legislation Wednesday that would raise the value of the maximum Pell Grant for the first time since 2002 and increase spending for several key academic research programs. Dozens of Republicans joined all but two Democrats in voting for House Joint Resolution 20, which would finance the operations of much of the federal government through the rest of the 2007 fiscal year, which began in October.
January 31, 2007
At meeting of accreditors, officials acknowledge need to measure student learning, but fear oversimplification.

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