Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

July 7, 2015
Darren Divine, vice president for academic affairs/acting vice president of student affairs at the Community College of Southern Nevada, has been selected as president of Casper College, in Wyoming. Julio Frenk, dean of faculty at the Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, has been appointed president of the University of Miami.
July 6, 2015
Sleep training might offer some interesting health benefits. In today's Academic Minute, the University of Minnesota's Michael Howell discusses the importance of sleep training.
July 6, 2015
Colleges and banks say new Education Department rules governing debit cards and more would limit choice and might be illegal, while consumer advocates urge the agency to crack down even further.
July 2, 2015
Paul Blake, interim provost and vice president of academic affairs at Ferris State University, in Michigan, has been named to the job on a permanent basis.
July 2, 2015
Don’t get scared, but the threat of ticks is growing. In today's Academic Minute, Indiana University's Keith Clay details the increasing presence of these insects.
July 2, 2015
Seven former female basketball players sued the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign on Wednesday, alleging that current and former coaches created a "hostile environment" for black players, The Chicago Tribune reported. The lawsuit charges that coaches held segregated practices, called black players and opponents derogatory names, and punished black players more severely than their white teammates. seeking comment from uni. dl
July 1, 2015
How does a black hole die? In today's Academic Minute, Bard College's Hal Haggard describes the life cycle of black holes.
July 1, 2015
Mark Emmert, president of the National Collegiate Athletic Association, took home $1.8 million in compensation in 2013, USA Today reported. Emmert's compensation included $1.37 million in base pay, up 8 percent from the year before, plus a mix of deferred and other reportable compensation, according to the newspaper's review of the NCAA's federal tax form.
June 30, 2015
More and more people appear to be leaving their religious communities. In today's Academic Minute, the University of Northern Colorado's Josh Packard discusses our relationship with religion.
June 30, 2015
Jimmie Bruce, vice president of academic success at Northwest Vista College, in Texas, has been chosen as president of Eastern Gateway Community College, in Ohio. Mary Schmidt Campbell, dean emerita of the Tisch School of the Arts and university professor in the New York University's Department of Art and Public Policy, has been appointed president of Spelman College, in Georgia.

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