Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

May 3, 2016
Do women know when to keep their partners away from other ovulating women? In today's Academic Minute, Arizona State University's Steven Neuberg explores this question.
May 3, 2016
Today on the Academic Minute, Steven Neuberg, foundation professor in the department of psychology at Arizona State University, explores whether women know when to keep their partners away from other ovulating women. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.
May 2, 2016
Examining how bones bounce back after breaking may help us build machines. In today's Academic Minute, Cornell University's Chris Hernandez delves into how bones heal themselves and return to their original function.
May 2, 2016
Today on the Academic Minute, Chris Hernandez, associate professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at Cornell University, delves into how bones heal themselves and return to their original function, which could give machines in faraway places a chance to last longer without replacement parts. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.
April 29, 2016
William C. Dudley, provost and professor of philosophy at Williams College, in Massachusetts, has been chosen as president of Washington and Lee University, in Virginia.
April 29, 2016
Can you call someone the greatest of all time when not all people were allowed to play? In today's Academic Minute, Louisiana State University's Lori Martin discusses how racism has tinged this question since the early days of major competitive sports.
April 29, 2016
Today on the Academic Minute, Lori Martin, associate professor in the departments of sociology and African and African-American Studies at Louisiana State University, discusses how racism has clouded the question of who the "all-time greats" are since the early days of major competitive sports. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.
April 28, 2016
It pays to be a team player. In today's Academic Minute, the University of Central Florida's Steven Whiting examines how being part of the team can lead to a bigger payday from your employer.
April 28, 2016
Today on the Academic Minute, Steven Whiting, assistant professor of management at the University of Central Florida, examines how being part of the team can lead to a bigger payday from your employer. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.
April 27, 2016
This month's edition of the “Pulse” podcast features an interview with Christopher Jaynes, chief technology officer at Mersive, whose Solstice product enables multiple users to share a common display on their own devices.

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