Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

November 3, 2016
Political narratives are an important part of an election cycle. In today's Academic Minute, Bryant University's Richard Holtzman explores the importance of narrative to political candidates.
November 3, 2016
Today on the Academic Minute, Richard Holtzman, associate professor of political science at Bryant University, explores the importance of narrative to political candidates. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.
November 2, 2016
How do you promote civil discourse in our democracy? In today's Academic Minute, Meredith College's Whitney Manzo explains how getting students thinking and talking about it may help turn the tide.
November 2, 2016
Today on the Academic Minute, Whitney Manzo, assistant professor of political science at Meredith College, details how getting students thinking and talking about civil discourse may help encourage it in our society. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.
November 1, 2016
What makes a candidate qualified for political office? In today's Academic Minute, Shippensburg University's Cynthia Botteron explains how other countries handle this question and whether Americans could learn a thing or two.
November 1, 2016
Today on the Academic Minute, Cynthia Botteron, professor of political science at Shippensburg University, explores how other countries approach the qualifications of their political candidates and whether Americans could learn a thing or two. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.
October 31, 2016
This Halloween, be on the lookout for vampires -- and tuberculosis. In today's Academic Minute, Chapman University's Charles Sohaskey asks if this disease could play a part in the origin of vampire mythology.
October 31, 2016
Today on the Academic Minute, Charles Sohaskey, a postdoctoral research faculty member at Chapman University, explores if TB could play a part in the origin of vampire mythology. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.
October 28, 2016
The Great Pumpkin and Charlie Brown are part of Halloween. In today's Academic Minute, Washington and Lee University's Stephen Lind takes a deeper look at this classic TV special and the lessons it teaches us about faith and doubt.
October 28, 2016
Today on the Academic Minute, Stephen Lind, assistant professor of business administration and communication at Washington and Lee University, takes a deeper look at the classic Charlie Brown TV special and the lessons it teaches us about faith and doubt. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

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