Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

October 28, 2016
Pennsylvania State University defamed the former assistant football coach who initially brought to light charges of molestation in the university's football program, a jury ruled Thursday in awarding $7.3 million in damages, the Associated Press reported. The jury concluded that Penn State defamed Mike McQueary in a statement the day Jerry Sandusky was charged.
October 27, 2016
Political discussions are often uncivil. In today's Academic Minute, the University of South Dakota's Matthew C. Moen examines a few ideas to improve political discourse.
October 27, 2016
Today on the Academic Minute, Matthew C. Moen, professor of political science at the University of South Dakota, delves into a few ideas to improve political discourse. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.
October 27, 2016
Federal appeals court rules that Central Lakes College acted legally when it kicked a student out of a nursing program for comments deemed unprofessional and threatening.
October 26, 2016
LaVerne Harmon, executive vice president at Wilmington University, in Delaware, has been named president there. Douglas J. Jensen, president of the Alabama Technology Network, has been chosen as president of Rock Valley College, in Illinois.
October 26, 2016
The College of Southern Idaho has agreed to pay $650,000 to settle a lawsuit in which a former vice president claimed she faced discrimination as a woman and an immigrant. Edit Szanto was placed on involuntary leave from Southern Idaho in 2014 after a total of 17 years at the institution, most recently as vice president for student services. She claimed in complaints to state and federal agencies and eventually in a federal lawsuit that the university treated her unfairly because of her gender and because she was foreign born.
October 26, 2016
Do we learn more about politics through comedy shows? In today's Academic Minute, Loyola University Maryland's Amy Bree Becker details the mixing of politics and comedy and how it affects our views.
October 26, 2016
Today on the Academic Minute, Amy Bree Becker, assistant professor in the department of communication at Loyola University Maryland, details the mixing of politics and comedy and how it affects our views. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.
October 26, 2016
The union representing Harvard University's striking dining hall employees said Tuesday that the workers and the university had reached a "tentative agreement" on a new contract. In a statement on its website, Unite Here Local 26 said a vote to end the three-week strike -- over wages, insurance and other issues -- would come Wednesday. A Harvard spokeswoman told The Boston Globe that the settlement would "represent a fair and reasonable resolution to negotiations."
October 25, 2016
How did the Electoral College come to be? In today's Academic Minute, Stanford University's Jack Rakove explores the origin of this sometimes maligned style of election.

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