Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

October 25, 2016
Today on the Academic Minute, Jack Rakove, professor of history and political science at Stanford University, explores the origin of this sometimes maligned style of election. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.
October 25, 2016
Harvard University did not defame or breach a contract with a former law school student when it noted a plagiarism finding on her transcript, a federal appeals court ruled Monday. In its ruling, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the First Circuit upheld a lower court decision dismissing a lawsuit by Megon Walker, who had alleged that the plagiarism finding should not have applied to a draft of a note she submitted to a student-run law journal.
October 24, 2016
His presidencies and writings such as The Shape of the River had a significant impact on higher education.
October 24, 2016
Will young voters help decide this election? In today's Academic Minute, Wright State University's Corey Seemiller discusses Generation Z and whether they’ll make a showing at the polls.
October 24, 2016
Today on the Academic Minute, Corey Seemiller, assistant professor in organizational leadership at Wright State University, details Generation Z and whether they’ll make a showing at the polls. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.
October 21, 2016
Could modern conspiracy theories be traced back to ancient Rome? In today's Academic Minute, the University of Florida's Victoria Pagan delves into whether ancient examples can relate to present day theories.
October 21, 2016
Today on the Academic Minute, Victoria Pagan, professor in and chair of the department of classics at the University of Florida, delves into whether ancient examples can relate to present-day theories. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.
October 20, 2016
Should the electoral college be abolished? In today's Academic Minute, American Public University's Stephen Schwalbe details why that might not be the best course of action.
October 20, 2016
Today on the Academic Minute, Stephen Schwalbe, program director of political science at American Public University, details why that might not be the best course of action. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.
October 20, 2016
A federal appeals court on Wednesday overturned a lower court ruling that dismissed a False Claims Act lawsuit in which two former employees accused a for-profit college of falsifying grades to keep students eligible for federal financial aid. The ruling by the U.S.

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