Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

January 16, 2017
Today on the Academic Minute, Ruth Thompson-Miller, assistant professor of sociology at the University of Dayton, discusses how some scars -- like those of the Jim Crow era -- are carried on the inside. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.
January 13, 2017
Roughly one in four students are leaving British colleges and universities with top honors, raising concerns about grade inflation and the devaluation of degrees, The Telegraph reported. More than 104,000 students graduated last year with a top degree classification, a fivefold increase since 1999, the newspaper said, prompting some leading employers to shift their emphasis from grades to work experience in the hiring process.
January 13, 2017
A new professional football league is presenting itself as an alternative to college-age players who want to be treated like employees rather than students, The Washington Post reported. The founders of Pacific Pro Football, which will start in 2018 with four teams in Southern California, plan to require players to be no more than four years out of high school, taking aim directly at college-age players, and will pay them an average of $50,000 a year.
January 13, 2017
Do dolphins speak in different dialects? In today's Academic Minute, Winthrop University's William Rogers examines river dolphins in Peru to answer this question.
January 13, 2017
Today in the Academic Minute: William Rogers, professor of biology at Winthrop University, examines river dolphins in Peru to gauge whether dolphins speak in different dialects. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.
January 12, 2017
What can fruit flies tell us about ourselves? In today's Academic Minute, the University at Albany's Prashanth Rangan delves into this question.
January 12, 2017
Today on the Academic Minute, Prashanth Rangan, associate professor of biological sciences at the University at Albany, explores what fruit flies can tell us about ourselves. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.
January 11, 2017
Maenette K. P. Ah Nee-Benham, dean of the Hawaiʻinuiākea School of Hawaiian Knowledge at the University of Hawaii at Manoa, has been named chancellor of the university's West Oahu campus. Jonathan D. Green, provost and dean of the faculty at Illinois Wesleyan University, has been appointed president of Susquehanna University, in Pennsylvania.
January 11, 2017
Was status always important to men? In today’s Academic Minute, the University of Richmond’s Christopher von Rueden explores whether hunter-gatherers cared as much as modern men about their status among the tribe.
January 11, 2017
Today on the Academic Minute, Christopher von Rueden, assistant professor of leadership studies at the University of Richmond, details whether hunter-gatherers cared as much as modern men about their status among the tribe. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

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