Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

June 15, 2009
The Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges on Thursday declared a state of financial emergency, citing cuts in state funding. The move makes it easier for the community colleges in the state to terminate tenure-track or tenured faculty members. A spokeswoman for the state board noted that no college has indicated that it will use that authority at this time.
June 15, 2009
John T. Casteen III announced Friday that he will retire next year from the presidency of the University of Virginia, having then served 20 years in the position -- an unusually long period for presidents of public flagships these days. Under Casteen, Virginia has pushed to diversify its student body and new financial aid programs have specifically led to increased enrollment of low-income students.
June 15, 2009
Babies who are breastfed are more likely to enroll in college later, a new study has found. The research -- discussed in an article by Reuters -- was based on 126 children from 59 families -- and compared siblings who were breastfed as infants to siblings who were fed from bottles. The study found that breastfed infants earned better grades in high school and then went on to college at higher rates.
June 12, 2009
The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas is receiving a $100 million gift from former Texas Gov. Bill Clements, The Dallas Morning News reported. Not only is the gift a large one for this period of economic uncertainty, but there are no restrictions on the use of the gift -- and gifts of that size rarely come without any stipulations.
June 12, 2009
Martha Minow was on Thursday named the next dean of Harvard University's law school -- one of the most prominent positions in legal education nationally. Minow, who has taught at the law school since 1981, is known for a wide range of intellectual interests and for leading the efforts to reform the law school's curriculum in recent years.
June 12, 2009
David Ashley, president of the University of Nevada at Las Vegas for three years, may not reach four, The Las Vegas Review-Journal reported. Ashley rushed back from a trip to Singapore -- a trip the system chancellor didn't want him to make -- to deal with demands that he resign. He has been criticized for his "lax" management style, for not being sufficiently engaged on campus, and over clashes between his wife and some employees, the newspaper reported.
June 11, 2009
A coalition of science organizations has issued a call for reform of visa procedures that have made it difficult -- unnecessarily so, in the view of these groups -- for foreign students and scholars to get into the United States for study, research and teaching. The statement notes increasing concerns about delays growing, and praises recent steps by the Obama administration to deal with the problems. Going forward, the statement calls for a series of additional steps, including:
June 11, 2009
For more than a year, Lambuth University has been experiencing severe financial problems, leading to turnover of key officials, a series of budget cuts, and late payrolls. The university is now in talks with Tennessee officials about becoming a public institution, The Jackson Sun reported.
June 11, 2009
The University of Idaho is investigating apparent discrepancies in the way the director of its veterinary teaching center denied the existence of research that was found by the Associated Press to exist.
June 11, 2009
In a move that is projected to save the institution nearly $60,000 annually, the University of Wisconsin at La Crosse is planning to eliminate its men’s tennis and baseball teams. The proposed cuts are part of a $400,000 trimming of the university’s operating budget.

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