Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

July 31, 2009
The head of a committee examining the University of Illinois admissions controversy is expected to call today for all of the university's current trustees to step aside, The Chicago Tribune reported. Abner Mikva, a former federal judge, said he would urge the panel to recommend a mass resignation when the committee meets to draft its report.
July 31, 2009
About 130,000 college students in Illinois won't receive state financial aid grants this year because the state moved up its deadline for applications because of the economy, the Chicago Sun-Times reported. Some students lose out on aid every year, in Illinois and elsewhere, because they miss the deadline for applying, but this year's total is the most in history because the cutoff is months earlier than normal; it was moved up because the state aid budget is about half its normal size.
July 31, 2009
The American Council on Education will delay salary increases for six months, offer "early exit" packages to employees, and cut spending by 10-15 percent for some programs in the 2010 fiscal year, to weather an expected decline in revenues and shift money to key priorities of President Molly Corbett Broad, association officials told employees Thursday.
July 31, 2009
Sallie Mae spent nearly $2 million in the first half of 2009 on federal lobbying at a time when Congress and the Obama administration are contemplating a radical restructuring of the student loan programs, the Huffington Post reported.
July 31, 2009
Citing the state’s severe budget problems, the University of California at Irvine announced that it will cut its men’s and women’s swimming and diving, men’s and women’s rowing, and sailing teams.
July 30, 2009
A key advisory panel for the Centers and Disease Control and Prevention recommended Wednesday that all people aged 24 and under be vaccinated against the H1N1 virus, commonly referred to as the swine flu.
July 30, 2009
The largest donor in the history of Florida Atlantic University has told the institution that he cannot fulfill a $16 million pledge he made in 2007, and that he will pay $1 million more (on top of $4 million he has already provided) to bring his total gift to $5 million, the Sun-Sentinel reported.
July 30, 2009
The city council in Santa Fe, N.M., voted Wednesday night to raise $30 million to buy the campus of the defunct College of Santa Fe and lease it to Laureate Education for an arts school set to open this fall, The Sante Fe New Mexican reported.
July 30, 2009
The federal program that funds career and technical education gives states significant flexibility in evaluating how effectively they spend that money -- to the point that it is difficult for the U.S. Education Department to compare states and judge the nation's overall performance, the Government Accountability Office said in a report released Wednesday. The GAO's review was designed to assess how states have implemented performance measures mandated by the Carl D.
July 30, 2009
The closure Monday of an insolvent private vocational college in Australia that caters to foreign students has renewed concerns about the regulation of private educational providers there, The Australian reported. Sterling College, which operates campuses in Sydney and Brisbane, went into "administration" (a bankruptcy equivalent) Monday, leaving hundreds of students from India at risk of losing not only their tuition payments but also their visas, the newspaper reported.

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