Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

September 23, 2009
Education Management Corp., which three years ago went private in a sale to private equity investors, plans to re-enter the public markets by selling 20 million shares of stock in a bid to raise approximately $350 million, the higher education company announced Tuesday.
September 23, 2009
Two-thirds of full-time M.B.A. programs received more applications in 2009 than in the previous year, according to survey results released Tuesday by the Graduate Management Admission Council. But more than half of part-time or executive programs reported that application levels were decreasing or were flat. The latter programs have been hurt at some business schools by the inability of businesses to pay for degrees for employees.
September 23, 2009
The U.S. Department of State on Tuesday proposed a set of regulatory changes in its Exchange Visitor program, which brings scholars, students and others to the United States for educational purposes. The proposed rules, which were published in the Federal Register and are open to public comment through November 23, amends the "general provisions" portion of federal regulations governing various visa programs for educational exchanges.
September 23, 2009
With protests planned for Thursday's lecture at Purdue University by William Ayers, the university has imposed limits on who may attend the talk, The Journal and Courier reported. The university will give seats first to student in fields that relate to Ayers' work -- sociology, women's studies, African-American studies, education and child development.
September 23, 2009
When tax preparers helped them fill out federal student aid form, low-income Americans were likelier to qualify for financial assistance and to enroll in college.
September 22, 2009
WASHINGTON -- For weeks, spilling into months, those who watch the for-profit sector of higher education most closely (especially Wall Street analysts and some of the colleges' critics) have been speculating about what the U.S. Government Accountability Office was cooking up in a report on the institutions.
September 22, 2009
Guy E. Lometti, dean of the graduate school at the College of New Rochelle, in New York, has been named provost and dean of faculty of the College of Mount Saint Vincent, also in New York.Ricardo Maestas, vice president for student and university relations and dean of students at the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, has been chosen as president of Sul Ross State University, in Texas.Jere W.
September 22, 2009
A Brandeis University committee has recommended that the university keep the Rose Museum of Art open to the public, but the panel didn't take a position on whether its prized modern art collection should be maintained or sold, The Boston Globe reported. Brandeis infuriated arts scholars nationwide with a plan -- now on hold -- to shut the museum and sell the collection, which is worth hundreds of millions of dollars.
September 22, 2009
With the economic downturn threatening the viability of some university presses, any "review" of a publishing house is likely to crank up the jitters.
September 22, 2009
Jill Landesberg-Boyle has agreed to go on leave, ending her controversial term as president of Florida Keys Community College, The Miami Herald reported. While Landesberg-Boyle was praised by some at the college for academic improvements, many employees charged her with creating a destructive work environment. Until her contract ends on June 15, she will keep her salary and benefits package of $157,000 a year.

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