Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

April 23, 2010
The University of Oregon has "reassigned" its general counsel to teach at the law school, The Eugene Register-Guard reported. University officials aren't commenting on the reasons behind the switch, but it follows a controversy over the departure package negotiated by the university with its athletic director.
April 23, 2010
Faculty members at Columbus State University have voted no confidence in President Tim Mescon and Provost Inessa Levi, by wide margins, The Columbus Ledger-Enquirer reported. Faculty members cited a number of grievances, including tenure decisions and shifts in library oversight, and administrators have pulled back on some of the decisions that angered professors.
April 22, 2010
The Association of American Universities on Wednesday announced that it had invited the Georgia Institute of Technology to become a member -- an offer the institute accepted immediately. Georgia Tech brings AAU membership to 63. The association is an invitation-only group whose members are selected on the basis of the breadth and quality of research and graduate programs, among other qualities.
April 22, 2010
The Arizona Board of Regents has agreed to pay $700,000 to 41 individuals in the Havasupai tribe to compensate them for the use of their blood in research that they believe they never authorized, Indian Country Today reported. The tribe members say that they believed they gave blood samples only for limited use in a diabetes study, and that they later found out about much broader use -- including in studies that they never would have authorized.
April 22, 2010
American college students -- cut off from social media for 24 hours -- use the same words to describe their feelings as as associated with those addicted to drugs or alcohol, according to a new study by the International Center for Media and the Public Agenda, at the University of Maryland at College Park. In the study, 200 Maryland students were asked to abstain from using social media for 24 hours and then to write their feelings.
April 22, 2010
The new union for non-tenure-track faculty members at Western Michigan University has negotiated a first contract with the university. The union, affiliated with the American Federation of Teachers, hasn't released details of the contract yet. A statement from Karl Schrock, the president of the union, said: "We are pleased with the improvements to our working conditions that will occur as a result of this first contract.
April 22, 2010
The U.S. Justice Department on Wednesday announced an agreement with Troy University that resolved a complaint that the institution had violated federal law by terminating Cleopatra Jones from a position in human resources while she was on military leave, and then failing to give her a position upon the conclusion of her military service. The university has agreed to pay Jones $36,960 and to take steps to avoid future violations of laws regarding the employment rights of those in the military.
April 22, 2010
The Michigan Senate on Wednesday passed legislation to regulate stem cell research, barring the sale or purchase of human eggs and requiring universities to file annual reports on how many embryos they are using, The Detroit News reported.
April 22, 2010
Quebec officials are blasting a McGill University plan to raise tuition substantially for its M.B.A. program -- to $30,000 from about $1,700. McGill officials said that they increases are needed to preserve the quality of the program, and that the new rates wouldn't be outside the norms for top programs.
April 22, 2010
Having watched its sister school of education more than quadruple enrollment in its master's in teaching program by going online, the University of Southern California's social work school is now following suit with its own highly ranked master's program in social work.

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