Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

To reach this person, click here.

Most Recent Articles

October 28, 2009
The U.S. Education Department published final regulations Tuesday to carry out changes Congress made to federal law governing higher education accreditation. The rules, which were published in the Federal Register, deal with a wide range of issues involving the relationships between the federal government and accrediting agencies, and between the agencies and the colleges they accredit.
October 28, 2009
Two of the five finalists to become president of New Mexico State University recently left chancellorships elsewhere amid considerable controversy. One of them is Richard Herman of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, who resigned amid a furor over an admissions system (no ended) that gave preferences to politically connected applicants.
October 28, 2009
The United States is losing ground in the world economy because of declines in educational attainment, according to a new report by the American Association of State Colleges and Universities. The report cites data showing that the United States and Germany were the only two nations in which those aged 25–34 have attained less education than their parents’ generation.
October 28, 2009
For-profit giant reports that its enrollment grew to 443,000 as of August, up 22 percent from a year ago. But stock drops as company announces federal inquiry.
October 27, 2009
In discrimination suit against Cornell labor school, U.S. appeals panel finds that letting an instructor's contract lapse is an "adverse employment action."
October 27, 2009
Southwestern College, a community college outside San Diego, has been under fire since last week's suspension of four faculty members, following a protest that criticized the administration. With professors saying that they are being punished for expressing their views, the college late Monday issued a new statement -- but that statement (while noting that one suspension has been lifted) only further angered the professors.
October 27, 2009
Carnegie Mellon University must defend itself against charges that it fraudulently and negligently misrepresented the state of its research on microwave technology to an investor who lost millions on the work, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit ruled Monday.
October 27, 2009
In 2005, Syracuse University created MayFest, a one-day festival of academic events, with regular classes called off for the day. The Syracuse Post-Standard reported that students responded by organizing massive off-campus parties on that day. So this year, the university has renamed the event -- and will not cancel classes.
October 27, 2009
The following meetings, conferences, seminars and other events will be held in the coming weeks in and around higher education. They are among the many such that appear in our calendar on The Lists on Inside Higher Ed, which also includes a comprehensive catalog of job changes in higher education. This listing will appear as a regular feature in this space.
October 26, 2009
Idaho State University lacks sufficient evidence to justify the termination of a tenured professor charged with a pattern of abusive and disruptive behavior, a faculty panel ruled Friday. Habib Sadid, an engineering professor who has been at Idaho State for more than 20 years, was suspended and barred from campus in August. Sadid has challenged administrators publicly, and in 2005 he organized a no-confidence vote in the university's former president, who later resigned amid protests about his compensation.

Pages

Back to Top