Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

August 25, 2009
The Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools announced Monday that an appeals panel had upheld the commission's decision in June to terminate the accreditation of Paul Quinn College.
August 25, 2009
Lawsuits charging for-profit colleges with misleading students or abusing federal financial aid laws are not uncommon, and many such suits are dismissed without findings of wrongdoing. But it is rarer for such lawsuits to be brought by senior administrators at the colleges in question, as is the case with one now being brought against American InterContinental University, as reported Monday by the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.
August 25, 2009
The notion of stimulus funds for a sex study was too much for The New York Post and some Republicans to pass by, so now a Syracuse University professor is the latest social scientist to have his work get a little extra scrutiny.
August 25, 2009
Nearly two-thirds of borrowers with private student loans in 2007-8 had not taken full advantage of the cheaper and safer federal student loans for which they would have qualified, the Project on Student Debt said in a report Monday.
August 25, 2009
Stanley H. Kaplan, who founded his eponymous test-preparation business in 1938, died Sunday at the age of 90. Although Kaplan sold his then-nationwide business to The Washington Post Company in 1984, he served as president until he retired in 1994. A biography posted on the company's Web site notes that Kaplan's interest in testing dates to his rejection from medical schools in an era when Jewish, working class students had a hard time demonstrating their credentials.
August 24, 2009
Several more colleges and universities are reporting outbreaks of H1N1 virus, or students with flu symptoms that could indicate H1N1.
August 24, 2009
The University of Northern Iowa has frustrated many of its donors with an insurance program that turned out to violate federal tax laws, The Des Moines Register reported. The program -- a group insurance offering -- was supposed to be a benefit available to donors to an athletic scholarship fund. But the university spent years fighting with the insurance company over specifics, and only this year determined that the effort violated federal law.
August 24, 2009
Beware the powerful legislator who feels ignored by higher education. In Indiana, Sen. Luke Kenley, chair of the Budget Committee, criticized Indiana and Purdue Universities over tuition increases, asking them to scale them back in light of the recession. Nothing happened. Senator Kenley's response? He's now threatening to use his committee's role to delay $53 million in construction projects at the universities, The Indianapolis Star reported.
August 24, 2009
While more college athletes who are gay have come out in recent years, they have not included big-time football players. But a survey of 85 football players in ESPN magazine found that just under half know a gay teammate, and that the number increases to 70 percent in the Pacific-10 conference.
August 24, 2009
Authorities in Germany are investigating about 100 professors involved in possible bribery to help students obtain their Ph.D.'s, the Associated Press reported. Hundreds of doctoral students may have been involved, although it is unclear whether they knew about the bribes. Authorities say that the students were paying money to a company that promised to help them with their doctorates, and that this company in turn paid the professors.

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