Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

October 12, 2009
The College of William and Mary gave a state senator, Tommy Norment, an appointment teaching two courses a year, for $160,000; six months later he sponsored spending measures worth $20 million for the college, The Virginian-Pilot reported. College officials and Norment defended the appointment, saying he was providing good learning opportunities for students, and that his legislative work was not related to his college pay.
October 12, 2009
Members of the adjunct union at Rhode Island College have voted to ratify a contract, the union's first with the college and the first for any adjunct union in Rhode Island, The Providence Journal reported. The contract provides for a 3 percent pay increase this year, the same level other faculty members at the college are receiving.
October 12, 2009
The University of Massachusetts at Amherst is planning to increase undergraduate enrollment by 15 percent over the next decade, with the additional students coming from out of state, The Boston Globe reported. If the plan succeeds, the share of undergraduate enrollment from outside Massachusetts would grow to 30 percent from 20 percent.
October 12, 2009
Students at the University of California at Berkeley staged a 24-hour sit-in this weekend at the anthropology library to draw attention to the extent of budget cuts in general at the university, and to the cuts being faced by specialized libraries, The San Francisco Chronicle reported. Most of Berkeley's small libraries are now closed on Saturdays because of budget cuts.
October 12, 2009
A professor at the University of California at Los Angeles last year reported to university officials that he had concerns about the mental health of the student now accused of slashing a classmate's throat last week, the Los Angeles Times reported.
October 12, 2009
The number of U.S. students visas issued in India fell 25 percent in the last year, The Economic Times reported. Experts told the newspaper that they believed the decline was not due to tougher standards on visas, but because many colleges in the United States appear to be cutting down on financial aid awards to Indian students, making them less interested in seeking a visa.
October 12, 2009
In a speech at the University of Virginia on Friday, Education Secretary Arne Duncan called for more Americans to consider teaching careers, and praised the U.Va. students for the rigor and breadth of their programs. But he also suggested that Virginia was the exception that demonstrated problems elsewhere with teacher education programs. "In far too many universities, education schools are the neglected stepchild. Often they don't attract the best students or faculty.
October 12, 2009
The e.Republic Center for Digital Education and Converge Magazine last week named the most technology-savvy community colleges in the country, based on a recent survey of community college officials.
October 12, 2009
Notice a lot of advertising from for-profit universities of late? Apparently so did the producers at "Saturday Night Live." This ad for the University of Westfield Online largely consists of student boasts of learning how to evade employers' questions about where they were educated.
October 9, 2009
Usually groups like the Project on Student Debt are worried about college students taking on too large a loan burden. But in a report released Thursday, the group argues that many community college students are actually hurt because their institutions do not give them access to federal loans. As a result, the group says, the students either work so much that they hurt their chances of succeeding academically, or turn to riskier and more expensive private loans instead.

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