Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

April 22, 2009
Marquette University's theology department last year asked the Faculty Council to study the ethics of a Roman Catholic university failing to offer health insurance to adjuncts. The Faculty Council has now come back and raised questions not only about that policy but many others. The group is asking the university to consider a number of questions, such as: Are some departments employing “permanent adjuncts,” and what are the implications if they are?
April 22, 2009
The San Jose City Council Tuesday night voted down a proposal to install filters on public library computers to block access to pornography, The San Jose Mercury News reported. Because the city and San Jose State University jointly run the main public library branch, the issue has concerned the university, where many professors and others believe that filters would violate academic freedom and block material (in many cases non-pornographic, but sexually explicit) used for scholarship.
April 22, 2009
Robert Shireman has long been a force in Washington, even when he's lived outside the Beltway. But he had probably never been a major player on Wall Street -- until Tuesday, when his appointment to a key post in the U.S. Education Department drove down the stocks of the publicly traded for-profit higher education companies.
April 22, 2009
The University of Louisville has concluded that a much-questioned doctorate it awarded -- for one semester of study -- was legitimate, The Louisville Courier-Journal reported. The doctorate was awarded to John Deasy in 2004 -- and appears to violate university rules about residency requirements.
April 21, 2009
What can you make with 23 plastic bottles? A graduation gown, it turns out. Tis the season (almost), and Oak Hall Cap & Gown, a company that counts more than 1,600 colleges as clients, has announced a new GreenWeaver line, featuring caps and gowns composed of 100 percent post-consumer recycled plastic bottles.
April 21, 2009
Three academics won Pulitzer Prizes in the arts on Monday. In fiction, the winner was Elizabeth Strout, who is on the M.F.A. faculty at Queens University in North Carolina. She won for Olive Kitteridge (Random House), a collection of short stories.
April 21, 2009
Three students at Lewis University, in Illinois, have been charged with disorderly conduct in an incident in which they are alleged to have made racial slurs to students in the dormitory room below theirs, and to have then lowered a noose outside the dormitory window, the Chicago Tribune reported.
April 21, 2009
A state audit has found that the University of Tennessee reported receiving $6.4 million in donations last year that the university never in fact received, The Knoxville News Sentinel reported. The missing gifts -- most for athletics -- were in pledges that were never paid. University officials said that they have since made the necessary adjustments in accounting statements.
April 21, 2009
A California grand jury on Monday unsealed indictments charging two animal rights activists with 10 counts of threatening scientists at the University of California at Los Angeles, the Los Angeles Times reported. UCLA has become a top target for vandalism and threats by radical animal rights groups. The two who were indicted pleaded not guilty and are being held in custody.
April 21, 2009
The Institute for Creation Research is suing Texas for the right to award master's degrees in the state. The Dallas Morning News reported that the suit charges the state with discriminating against the institute based on its views of evolution (on which the institute differs from mainstream science). The institute wants to award master's degrees to people who plan to teach science, and says it will teach evolution even as it also teaches creationism.

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