Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

July 24, 2009
Robert Doade, an associate professor of philosophy at Trinity Western University, in British Columbia, is among those academics who believe Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and other forms of social media may be distracting students and causing them anxiety. So Doade challenges students by offering them a 5 percent extra credit bonus if they will abstain from all social and traditional media for the three month semester of his philosophy course, and keep a journal about the experience.
July 24, 2009
President of financial aid group quits amid charges related to past position, as student aid officials put forward alternative to Obama student loan plan.
July 23, 2009
The U.S. Education Department proposed regulations today to carry out new federal laws governing student loans that were enacted when Congress renewed the Higher Education Act last summer.
July 23, 2009
President Obama held a press conference Wednesday evening to promote his health care proposals, but he received a question about the recent arrest of Henry Louis Gates Jr., the Harvard professor who was handcuffed at his own home after police investigated a report of someone (Gates himself) trying to break into his own home when the door was jammed. Obama joined many others who have criticized the arrest and related it to the trend of racial profiling. He said: "I think it’s fair to say, No.
July 23, 2009
Duke University on Wednesday announced it would shut down one session of its Talent Identification Program -- a summer enrichment program for youths -- after 25 of the 260 participants were diagnosed with the flu, presumed to be the H1N1 virus. None of the students are hospitalized or in serious danger, but Duke officials said they acted to avoid spreading the virus to other students in the program.
July 23, 2009
Secondhand smoke exposure is high among college students, a study in the journal Nicotine & Tobacco Research has found. The study analyzed 4,223 undergraduates at 10 colleges and universities in North Carolina, and found that 83 percent reported exposure to secondhand smoke at least once in the past week. The research was conducted by scientists at Wake Forest University.
July 23, 2009
At least six people were shot Wednesday night at an event at Texas Southern University honoring a Houston rapper, The Houston Chronicle reported. At least one of those shot attended the university, and none of the injuries are life-threatening, a university spokeswoman said. The event was outside and had been billed as a block party.
July 23, 2009
The digital era provides researchers with greatly enhanced ability to analyze and share data, but a new report warns that technology also makes it easier for data to be distorted. The report, from the National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, and Institute of Medicine, recommends that research institutions ensure that every investigator receives appropriate training on managing data responsibly.
July 23, 2009
Ward Churchill is hoping that the jury that heard his suit against the University of Colorado can persuade the judge to change his mind. The jury found for Churchill, but lacked the authority under state law to give him back his job as a tenured professor of ethnic studies at the Boulder campus. The judge then threw out the jury's finding, giving Churchill nothing.
July 22, 2009
Emerson College, in Massachusetts, has agreed to pay $780,000 back to students and to reform some aid practices to resolve an investigation by New York Attorney General Andrew M. Cuomo. About 4,000 students will receive refunds, including about 400 who are New Yorkers. (Massachusetts officials also participated in the probe.) Cuomo said that the college urged students to borrow money from lenders who did not necessarily offer the best deals.

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