Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

March 23, 2010
For the second time this month, students have organized a major event in California to draw attention to state budget cuts to higher education. Unlike the earlier protest, which involved rallies throughout the state, Monday's event focused on Sacramento, where community college students attracted thousands to demand more state support.
March 23, 2010
New York University is planning a major expansion, with the goal of increasing its physical capacity by 40 percent over the next 20 years, The New York Times reported. The expansion would take place at NYU's main campus in Greenwich Village and elsewhere in the city. As is the norm in New York City, the plans are likely to face considerable scrutiny from neighborhood groups and preservationists, the Times reported.
March 23, 2010
Everyone has a bracket these days. Stuart Rojstaczer, a former Duke University professor who documents and campaigns against grade inflation, unveiled a bracket in which he selected athletic conference members that have made it tough to earn an A. Among the colleges that make his "Sweet 16" are Boston University, Hampden-Sydney College, Florida International University and Reed College.
March 23, 2010
The University of Memphis has failed to persuade a National Collegiate Athletic Association appeals panel that penalties imposed on the institution's men's basketball and women's golf programs were excessive.
March 22, 2010
The North Carolina State Board of Community Colleges on Friday affirmed the right of students who do not have legal documentation to reside in the United States to enroll at community colleges (at out-of-state tuition rates), The Raleigh News & Observer reported.
March 22, 2010
Stanford University's medical school, known for tough conflict of interest rules for faculty members, will strengthen them further today, The New York Times reported. The additional rules will apply to hundreds of local physicians who teach at Stanford, and will subject these adjunct faculty members to the same restrictions as full-time medical professors. The rules ban gifts from companies that produce drugs or medical devices, or giving paid speeches drafted by these companies.
March 22, 2010
One animal rights activist has pleaded guilty and another no contest for their roles in stalking and harassing faculty members at the University of California at Los Angeles who conduct research with animals, the Los Angeles County District Attorney's Office announced Friday. One faces a prison sentence of three years while the other must stay away from all University of California campuses or property. UCLA officials praised authorities for cracking down on those who engage in harassment.
March 22, 2010
The University of Wisconsin at Madison last year suspended the right of a professor to work with animals after finding a "clear pattern" of problems with her treatment of animals, The Wisconsin State Journal reported. University officials said that Michele Basso showed a lack of respect to veterinarians and engaged in poor record-keeping about the use of animals. Basso denied violating any rules.
March 22, 2010
Lipscomb University, a private institution in Nashville, was recently revealed to have violated federal laws that bar bonuses paid to admissions officers based on the number of students they recruit. The violation occurred in 2003, but came to light in the wake of a U.S. Government Accountability Office report about incentive compensation last month.
March 22, 2010
Chris Avenir is suing Canada's Ryerson University in a $10 million class action over the institution's rule banning students from bringing lawyers to academic misconduct hearings where they could receive failing grades or be recommended for more severe punishment, The Toronto Star reported.

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