Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

February 18, 2010
Edythe M. Abdullah, president of the downtown campus of Florida State College in Jacksonville, has been selected as president of Essex County College, in New Jersey.
February 18, 2010
The University of California at Berkeley, barred by the state from considering race in admissions, is today announcing a major, privately supported effort to create an inclusive curriculum and campus. The San Francisco Chronicle reported that a $16 million gift -- which could grow considerably with matching funds -- will pay for a variety of efforts.
February 18, 2010
High schools in eight states have agreed to participate in a project aimed at using a system of "board examinations" to get high achieving students to do college-level work as early as 10th grade, the National Center for Education and the Economy announced Wednesday.
February 18, 2010
A committee studying enrollment strategy at the University of Texas at Austin has recommended that undergraduates be required to finish their degrees in 10 semesters, the Associated Press reported. The current average length of time is 8.5 semesters. Students enrolled in programs for which the expected completion time is longer than 8 semesters would be exempt, and appeals could be filed for special circumstances.
February 18, 2010
Taking a page from President Obama's recent criticism of Wall Street bankers, Education Secretary Arne Duncan sharpened his rhetoric about the student loan industry in urging Congress to pass an overhaul of federal student aid programs during a telephone news conference with reporters Tuesday. Student loan providers "had a free ride from taxpayers for too long," Duncan said, calling for passage of the Student Aid and Fiscal Responsibility Act that has passed the House and has been stalled for months behind health care legislation in the Senate.
February 18, 2010
George Washington University accidentally sent about 200 applicants it was rejecting an e-mail congratulating them and welcoming them to the institution, The Washington Post reported. The university followed up a few hours later with an explanation, no doubt disappointing the early decision applicants, for whom GW was their first choice college.
February 17, 2010
Williams College, which last month announced an end to its "no loans" policy for undergraduates in need of financial aid, on Tuesday moved to end the policy of being need-blind in admitting international students. Admitting international students without regard to need is unusual, even among the small group of private colleges like Williams that have that practice for undergraduates from the United States.
February 17, 2010
Some University of California graduate students have turned to satire, dressing in business attire to critique the policies of administrators and the Board of Regents, the San Francisco Chronicle reported. The group is called the UC Movement for Efficient Privatization.
February 17, 2010
Historians -- some with ties to the Kennedy family and some who have studied the family -- have created a Web site to denounce the History Channel for a forthcoming mini-series that they say is full of distortions.
February 17, 2010
Faculty members at the University of Alberta agreed to accept six furlough days in return for more access to information about university finances, The Edmonton Journal reported. Under the agreement, a new committee -- with equal representation of administrators and professors -- will review finances (including data previously unavailable to faculty members).

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