Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

September 2, 2009
The University of Miami is investigating an incident in which police officers questioned a student -- subsequently revealed not to be the person the officers were looking for -- at gunpoint, The Miami Herald reported. The incident has attracted considerable attention because some communications students witnessed it and made a videotape, which is on the Web site of The Miami Hurricane, the student newspaper.
September 2, 2009
Harvard University's medical school is backing away from new rules about student interaction with reporters, following complaints that the policy would block discussion of key issues, The New York Times reported. The controversial policy -- which officials have now vowed to change -- said that all interactions between students and the press needed to be coordinated by the deans of students and public affairs.
September 2, 2009
There may be a new standard in luxury residence halls in Boston, The Boston Globe reported. A new high-rise at Boston University features magnificent views of the city and the Charles River. Amenities, which the Globe said leave parents stunned, include large private bathrooms, walk-in closets, and full-length mirrors.
September 2, 2009
In-state students at all Indiana University campuses will be eligible for "incentive grants" of $200 to $300 a year if they achieve at least a B average this academic year. Had the program been in place last year, a majority of Indiana students would have qualified. The university announced the program amid legislative criticism of tuition increases.
September 2, 2009
Dennis Carroll, vice president and dean for academic affairs at High Point University, in North Carolina, has been promoted to provost and vice president for academic affairs there. Barbara Gellman-Danley, vice chancellor for academic affairs and system integration at the Ohio Board of Regents, has been named president of University of Rio Grande and Rio Grande Community College.
September 1, 2009
In 2006, Jon H. Oberg revealed himself as the Education Department researcher who had brought to light revelations that several student loan companies were taking advantage of a loophole in federal law that allowed them to continue to make loans for which they were guaranteed an interest rate return of 9.5 percent.
September 1, 2009
A state judge in Louisiana on Monday rejected a lawsuit challenging Tulane University's decision, as part of a post-Katrina reorganization, to shut down a separate division for women, the Associated Press reported. The suit was brought by the great-great-great niece of the woman who donated money to Tulane to found the college.
September 1, 2009
The president of the University of Illinois, Joseph White, and the chancellor of the Urbana-Champaign campus, Richard Herman, both appeared before the Senate at Urbana-Champaign Monday, each suggesting that the other was responsible for the admissions scandal at the university, the Chicago Tribune reported.
September 1, 2009
With community colleges in California facing massive budget cuts that could force them to limit enrollments, a new report shows just how against the grain those cuts could go. The California Postsecondary Education Commission projects that enrollment in the state's two-year institutions will top 2 million by 2019, an increase of more than 10 percent from the current levels.
September 1, 2009
One of the hot battles in standardized testing these days is over the M.B.A. market. The Graduate Management Admission Test has long been dominant.

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