Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

November 5, 2009
At meeting of higher ed researchers, scholars and policy wonks confront an old but still-present question: Can academic work influence decision makers?
November 4, 2009
Voters in Texas back expansion of research universities, while tax measures that higher ed opposed fail in Maine and Washington.
November 4, 2009
The American Association of Community Colleges announced Tuesday that George R. Boggs would retire in December 2010 after a decade as its president. Boggs, who spent 30 years as an administrator at two-year institutions in California before taking over at AACC in 2001, has led the association at a time of great progress for community colleges. Two-year college officials have praised him as a thoughtful and pragmatic leader.
November 4, 2009
Amherst College said Tuesday that it had received separate, unrestricted donations valued at $100 million and $25 million -- its largest gifts ever -- from alumni who wished to remain anonymous. Both donors said they wanted to help Amherst remain both highly selective and accessible to students from all socioeconomic backgrounds, said Anthony W. Marx, president of the Massachusetts liberal arts college.
November 4, 2009
Years after Mississippi pledged to create a $35 million private endowment to support the state's three historically black colleges, only $1 million has been raised and there are no active efforts to add to the fund, The Jackson Clarion Ledger reported. While some advocates for black colleges hope to pressure the state to create the fund, others say it seems clear the endowment will never materialize.
November 4, 2009
Colleges and universities were among the entities that allegedly miscalculated how many jobs had been saved on their campuses through the use of federal stimulus funds, leading to overcounting of the national numbers, The Wall Street Journal reported.
November 4, 2009
British government leaders have called on universities to be more inclusive in whom they admit, with less of a focus on grades or test scores in cases where applicants may have potential, The Guardian reported.
November 3, 2009
Matteo Fontana, the former general manager for financial-partner services in Education Department's student-aid office, pleaded guilty to conflict-of-interest and false-statement charges over his ownership of stock in a loan company, The Wall Street Journal reported. Fontana held as many as 10,500 shares of Education Lending Group Inc. when he joined the Education Department in 2002, prosecutors said.
November 3, 2009
The University of Mississippi has altered its fight song to discourage a chant of "the South will rise again," based on the old version. With many fans continuing that chant -- which many find offensive -- Chancellor Dan Jones said Monday that either the chant stops, or he'll bar the song from being played at football games, the Associated Press reported. "The University of Mississippi is a warm and welcoming place.
November 3, 2009
About 2,700 teaching and research assistants walked off the job Monday at McMaster University, in Ontario, The Canadian Press reported. Negotiations have resumed on a new contract.

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