Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

November 16, 2009
Graduate teaching assistants at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign are planning to go on strike today, following the failure to complete a contract agreement. The union, affiliated with the American Federation of Teachers, said that while many contract issues were resolved, the university would not offer assurances about the continuation of tuition waivers.
November 16, 2009
Southwestern College, a community college in California, has announced that no charges will be filed against three professors who were suspended (with pay, but without charges) amid allegations by college officials that some of them may have violated the law in relation to a protest of the college's response to budget cuts, News 10 San Diego reported.
November 16, 2009
Google along with a group of publishers and authors has proposed changes to the settlement of legal challenges to Google's mammoth book archiving project. The changes, among other things, limit the international application of the settlement. The changes did not win over some of the leading critics of the earlier agreement.
November 16, 2009
Keith Fagnou, 38, a professor at the University of Ottawa who was considered a rising star in chemistry, died last week, apparently from H1N1 complications, The Globe and Mail reported. Colleagues were stunned by the death. Unlike many H1N1-related deaths, no underlying health conditions were noted in Fagnou's illness.
November 16, 2009
A state legislator in Alabama -- with backing from Gov. Bob Riley, a fellow Republican -- is organizing support for legislation to cut off state funds to public universities that offer benefits to the same-sex partners of employees, the Associated Press reported. The move follows announcements by the University of Alabama at Birmingham that it was starting domestic partner benefits October 1. The University of Alabama at Huntsville will start offering the benefits January 1.
November 16, 2009
Students took over the Science and Engineering Library at the University of California at Santa Cruz Friday night to keep it open that night and Saturday -- as had been the case before budget cuts limited its hours. A statement from the students said: "We realize that this one action will not force the university administration to change its disastrous course. Nevertheless, our action will allow the library to remain open for students Friday night and Saturday.
November 16, 2009
An ethics scholar at Oxford University, Toby Ord, has pledged to give 1 million pounds (about $1.67 million) over the course of his career to charities in developing nations, BBC reported. Toby Ord, 30, estimates that he'll earn about 1.5 million pounds and that he doesn't need that much, and wants to inspire others to make similarly ambition donations.
November 16, 2009
Brooke Magnanti, a research scientist at Britain's University of Bristol, has revealed that she is the author of a blog and memoirs of work as a prostitute, and is the source of the material that was used to create the television series "Secret Diary of a Call Girl," BBC News reported. She said that she worked as a prostitute to pay for her doctoral work. A spokesman for the University of Bristol, said: "This aspect of Dr Magnanti's past is not relevant to her current role at the university."
November 16, 2009
NCAA study finds declining numbers of college players with signs of problem wagering, though Internet gaming and casual sports betting grow.
November 13, 2009
Ninety-eight percent of the 265 colleges and universities being tracked by the American College Health Association reported new cases last week of H1N1 or similar flu-like illnesses. The figure compares with 97 percent the prior week. Most of the cases being reported continue to be mild.

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