Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

October 7, 2009
Researchers in Britain, Israel and the United States are sharing the 2009 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their work on "the structure and function of the ribosome." The three winners are: Venkatraman Ramakrishnan, senior scientist and group leader at Structural Studies Division of the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, in Britain; Thomas A.
October 7, 2009
The 2010 edition of the College Sustainability Report Card, being released today, shows that despite the economic woes facing many colleges, many also made significant progress in adopting "green" policies. Grades are awarded based on reporting in a series of categories,including policies on climate change, food, recycling, buildings, transportation, endowments and so forth.
October 7, 2009
Sexually explicit materials continue to create controversies for Maryland's public university system. The Baltimore Sun reported on efforts by system officials, at legislative request, to develop a policy on student displays of pornographic movies.
October 7, 2009
A student's claim that he performed an exorcism on a former student at Berry College has set off a debate about certain religious practices at the institution, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported. The exorcism has drawn attention to the WinShape program, in which 100 students are given scholarships and tend to live together, while pledging to attend chapel services together and to abstain from using alcohol and drugs.
October 6, 2009
The 2009 Nobel Prize in Physics is being shared by three researchers. Half of the award is going to Charles K. Kao of the Standard Telecommunication Laboratories, in Britain, and the Chinese University of Hong Kong. He was honored for "groundbreaking achievements concerning the transmission of light in fibers for optical communication." The other half will be shared by Willard S. Boyle and George E.
October 6, 2009
A state judge on Monday dismissed many of the key charges against Ray Sansom, former speaker of the house in Florida, and Bob Richburg, former president of Northwest Florida State College, in a case that cost both of them their jobs, The Northwest Florida Daily News reported. The case focuses on allegedly inappropriate ties between Sansom and the college.
October 6, 2009
Colleges that play big-time basketball set ticket prices for their men's teams significantly higher than for their women's teams, and the differential seems to be explained at least partially by institutional discrimination, says a new paper published by the Wellesley Centers for Women at Wellesley College.
October 6, 2009
The Obama administration on Monday said it was concerned about a Senate spending bill that would provide about $200 million less for the National Science Foundation and the National Institute of Standards and Technology than President Obama has sought.
October 6, 2009
Amazon is famous for a lot of things, but foremost among them is the customer reviews that are appended to virtually every product it sells (the company went so far as to patent its approach).
October 6, 2009
Following a series of controversies, including the murder trial in Italy of one of its students, the University of Washington has tightened rules for study abroad, The Seattle Post-Intelligencer reported. Among the new rules: Department chairs must sign off on study abroad programs, students must have insurance and a cell phone, and program funds can't be used to buy alcohol.

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