Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

November 25, 2009
Mario Rocha, a freshman on a scholarship at George Washington University, is the subject of a profile in The Washington Post -- and this isn't your standard "frosh adjusts to college" story. Rocha was wrongly convicted of first degree murder and spent 10 years behind bars before his appeal won his freedom and he was able to pursue a higher education.
November 25, 2009
Students who choose a major early accumulate more skills than their peers but are likelier to switch to an unrelated occupation, study finds.
November 24, 2009
With $9 million in grants to 7 states and focus on recipients' common tactics for more productive use of money, Lumina Foundation aims to drive progress toward college completion goal.
November 24, 2009
Five adjuncts at Massachusetts community colleges have sued the state, saying that they meet the requirements for receiving health insurance from their institutions but are being denied coverage unfairly, The Boston Globe reported. The adjuncts -- backed by the faculty union for the community colleges -- hope to change the system for determining which instructors qualify for health insurance. State officials declined to comment on the suit.
November 24, 2009
Responding to claims that police used excessive force to quell campus protests Friday, the University of California at Berkeley will conduct an investigation of the events, university officials announced Monday. The probe will be conducted by the Campus Police Review Board, which includes representatives of students, faculty and staff.
November 24, 2009
A foundation charged by federal authorities with illegally providing assistance to Iran has also been making grants for years to universities, The New York Times reported. The grants -- to support study and teaching on Persian language and culture -- went to Columbia, Harvard, Portland State and Rutgers Universities.
November 24, 2009
The U.S. Education Department is investigating allegations that Virginia Military Institute -- which admitted women more than a decade ago only after a prolonged legal fight -- is discriminating against women today, the Associated Press reported. The allegations -- denied by VMI -- involve the environment at the institute, tenure policies, and rules against marriage and child-bearing by cadets. VMI officials say that they have cooperated fully with the investigation.
November 24, 2009
Students at the University of North Texas have voted down -- 58 to 42 percent -- a proposal to allow same-sex couples to run for spots in the homecoming court, The Dallas Morning News reported. Many colleges have had men win election as homecoming queens, women as kings, and transgender students in positions as well.
November 23, 2009
Authorities arrested 41 students at the University of California at Berkeley Friday, ending the latest building takeover on that campus in a series of protests statewide over cuts to public higher education and administrators' response to those cuts, the Los Angles Times reported. Hundreds of students had rallied outside a classroom building that the protesters occupied.
November 23, 2009
The White House will today announce a major new effort to boost science and mathematics education, The New York Times reported. The activities will primarily focus on children, not college students, reflecting broad concerns in scientific groups about whether enough young talent is attracted to science and prepared to study science. Major scientific societies, businesses and foundations are expected to be involved.

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