Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

January 6, 2010
The University of Winnipeg has put on hold for at least this academic year a plan to merge the departments of philosophy, classics and religious studies into a new humanities department, The Winnipeg Free Press reported. Many faculty members throughout Canada opposed the merger, and concerns remain about the state of the philosophy offerings. Winnipeg officials said they were holding off because of misconceptions about the plan.
January 6, 2010
The National Collegiate Athletic Association has upheld a vacation of records penalty against Florida State University for an “academic fraud” scandal involving 61 athletes in 10 sports. Chief among those affected by the penalty, Bobby Bowden, former head football coach, must vacate up to 14 wins from 2004 through 2007 in which players who received help cheating on some of their exams participated.
January 6, 2010
The French government is in an increasingly public fight with the country's elite colleges over admissions standards, Reuters reported. Government officials say that the colleges don't do enough to recruit low-income students, but the colleges say that they are being pressured to adjust merit-based admissions standards.
January 5, 2010
What's a cause without a political action committee?
January 5, 2010
Two professors at the University of California at Irvine received envelopes Monday with the words "Black Death" written on them, and with an unidentified white powder in them, the Associated Press reported. Authorities are testing the white powder to determine what it is, and initial tests were negative for biohazards. The buildings where the two professors work -- one in sociology and the other in engineering -- were evacuated.
January 5, 2010
Cornell University, in the face of opposition from the Ivy League, has stopped including athletes in a financial aid enhancement announced a year ago. Under the program, selected groups of students who qualified for need-based aid and who were particularly desirable to the university -- including some athletes -- had the parental contributions in their aid packages reduced.
January 5, 2010
Following in the footsteps of its wealthy peers across the Atlantic, the University of Cambridge plans to raise £400 million (about $635 million) in its first-ever bond offering, the Times of London reported. University officials told the newspaper that they worried about the first major borrowing in its 800-year existence, but that a bond issue was the best way to raise needed money for two building projects.
January 5, 2010
Study by USC research center aims to highlight Hispanic-serving colleges that most ably move Latino students into science fields, and graduate them.
January 4, 2010
The history department at Johns Hopkins University angered many of those applying for a faculty job in early modern European history last month by letting all 106 applicants for the coveted position know who had applied. An e-mail with an update on the status of the search didn't use the normal blind copy option, but included e-mail addresses for everyone. And this being a particularly good position, many of the applicants aren't publicly in a job search.
January 4, 2010
President Obama last week issued an executive order that would speed up the release of classified material to the public, and could lead to the declassification of material that might otherwise have never been made public. Among other provisions, the executive order creates a principle that no records may be classified indefinitely, eliminates the right of certain intelligence officials to "veto" declassification, and orders that information never be classified if "significant doubt" exists about the need to classify.

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