Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

March 30, 2009
Harvard University is taking steps to encourage more students to major in subjects that are central to knowledge, even if they aren't seen as the most practical, The Boston Globe reported. Among the changes: Pushing back the deadline for declaring a major (so students have more time to sample disciplines) and creating more small seminars in these fields, which will be taught by senior professors.
March 30, 2009
Even as many colleges report increased student applications, administrators remain deeply worried about what will happen to enrollments this fall, given the economic turmoil facing many families. A new survey of parents of current college students suggests that college leaders' concerns are legitimate, but that the damage may not be as severe as they fear.
March 30, 2009
As Congress prepares to take up their 2010 budget blueprints, supporters and critics of President Obama's proposal to eliminate the Family Federal Education Loan program are ramping up their arguments for and against the plan.
March 30, 2009
Yet more evidence has emerged of the impact of pharmaceutical industry support for medical education. The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reported on the differences between medical continuing education offered online by the University of Wisconsin for doctors to fulfill their continuing education obligations. The courses that receive financial support from the drug companies are free, and appear to suggest courses of action for patients that would involve the drug companies' products.
March 30, 2009
Valparaiso University, in Indiana, has removed a lesbian student from a seat on student government that is designated for minority students, Chicago Public Radio reported. The student said that it was appropriate for her to run for the position, since gay and lesbian students are in the minority, but the university maintains that the position is intended only for students in racial and ethnic minority groups.
March 30, 2009
Flooding of the Red River has led several colleges to close for most or all of the coming week. The closures are both to ensure safety and to permit many students and faculty members to help with sandbagging and other efforts to minimize flood damage.
March 30, 2009
Babson College has closed its campus until Wednesday morning because of an apparent norovirus outbreak that has hit dozens of students and others at the college. Several colleges and universities have been hit by outbreaks this academic year. The norovirus spreads rapidly in situations -- like those on a college campus -- where people live in close proximity to one another.
March 30, 2009
Five Hofstra University students have been arrested -- and have denied all charges -- in what police say was an unusual robbery attempt. Newsday reported that four students attempted to rob and threaten a fifth student. According to authorities, the four students were attempting to punish the fifth for selling them cocaine that was of inferior quality.
March 30, 2009
The Central Intelligence Agency has long recruited new college graduates as employees -- and those efforts have sometimes been controversial. But the agency is having success in attracting interest on campus, the Los Angeles Times reported, by working with marketing courses at universities, which take on the project of designing materials to publicize the CIA's recruiting efforts.
March 27, 2009
The most important fact about the preliminary data the U.S. Education Department released Thursday about student loan default rates is that the rate at which borrowers whose loans went into repayment in 2007 defaulted rose sharply, to 6.9 percent from 2006's 5.2 percent. That would seem to be a clear sign that the economic downturn is increasingly taking its toll, a worrisome trend from a public policy standpoint.

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