Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

To reach this person, click here.

Most Recent Articles

April 16, 2009
Protesters disrupted a speech Tuesday at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill by former Rep. Tom Tancredo, a leader of the movement to limit benefits to those who do not have the legal right to live in the United States. Video posted on YouTube shows the incident, which led Tancredo to stop his talk. Holden Thorp, chancellor at Chapel Hill, called Tancredo to apologize for the incident Friday.
April 16, 2009
Student cheating, a common problem when it comes to American students, is complicated further when students cross cultures and ethical boundaries, sessions at registrars' meeting reveal.
April 15, 2009
As Europe looks enviously at U.S. research productivity, economists examine which policy changes are likely to spur innovation. (Hint: Autonomous universities and competition for funds.)
April 15, 2009
Valley City State University, in North Dakota, has called off classes for the rest of the week because of flooding of the Sheyenne River. Local authorities have urged the evacuation of the area.
April 15, 2009
Virginia Tech's president has directed the dean of its College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences to rework tenure and promotion guidelines that critics complained required applicants to show that they have done work to promote diversity, according to the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education. In an e-mail message shared by the civil liberties group, a Virginia Tech spokesman confirmed that the provost, Mark McNamee, "has asked the college to rework its proposed guidelines.
April 15, 2009
Yale University has had a contentious history with its unions. But on Tuesday Yale and the UNITED HERE locals that represent the university's clerical, technical, service and maintenance unions announced tentative three-year contract deals, months before the expiration of current contracts. Yale and unions have been working to collaborate more and fight less, and both sides praised the agreement. The contracts include provisions for modest salary increases, job security measures, and an agreement to expand the unions' jurisdiction to new Yale campuses.
April 15, 2009
Free Exchange on Campus has released a detailed critique of David Horowitz's new book, One Party Classroom, which identifies what Horowitz considers the 150 worst courses in the United States. As with previous Horowitz writing, much of the book is focused on previous writing by Horowitz and a review of course syllabuses.
April 15, 2009
In two votes -- one for those on the tenure track and one for adjuncts -- faculty members at Montana State University at Bozeman have voted to unionize. The professors will be represented in separate units, but both are affiliated with the joint American Federation of Teachers-National Education Association state affiliate, which already represents faculty members in the rest of public higher education in the state.
April 14, 2009
Twenty pairs of African and American colleges were awarded grants Monday to help them develop collaborations aimed at attacking economic, health care, agricultural and other problems in Africa. The $50,000 grants, which were funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development and announced by Higher Education for Development, emerged from the work of the Africa-U.S.
April 14, 2009
Oregon's government on Monday sued the manager of the state's college savings plan, saying the company's risky investments were negligent and breached their contract together, Reuters reported. Like many such funds, Oregon's College Savings Plan, into which parents and others invest (with tax incentives) to save for college, has taken a beating in the stock market. But Oregon charges in its lawsuit that OppenheimerFunds Inc.

Pages

Back to Top