Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

January 28, 2010
Craven Community College has removed from public view artwork that depicts a popular instructor smoking a cigar (as he frequently does), The New Bern Sun-Journal reported. Officials at the North Carolina community college said that they feared the artwork was inconsistent with the college's stance against smoking.
January 27, 2010
The University of Montana may deal with state budget cuts by adopting a four-day week for classes and work schedules, The Missoulian reported. The idea is estimated to save $450,000, mostly on utility cost reductions, which also reflect the environmental gains from the approach. All class meetings would be Tuesday through Friday, with class times shifted to 90 minutes, and more classes at 8 a.m. The standard employee work day would be 10 hours.
January 27, 2010
Oregon's normally tax-skeptical voters on Tuesday approved two tax increases that will limit further cuts to state support for education, The Oregonian reported. The measures raise taxes on wealthy individuals and on corporations. Because the current state budget was built on the assumption that the additional tax revenue would materialize, a defeat would have led to major new rounds of budget cuts.
January 27, 2010
California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger pleased higher education leaders this month by proposing that the state's Constitution be amended to ensure that the state's two major public university systems receive no less than 10 percent of the state's operating funds each year, with the additional funds coming from cuts in spending on prisons. Now the plan is getting tough criticism from the nonpartisan Legislative Analyst's Office.
January 27, 2010
Pro-gun organizations have angered many educators in the last year with bills that would end bans on carrying concealed weapons on campus. Higher education leaders have generally replied that colleges have enough problems without gun-wielding students or, even worse, drunk, gun-wielding students.
January 27, 2010
The American Association of University Professors has launched a new Journal of Academic Freedom, which will be published annually or twice a year. The debut issue features articles that look back in time (on academic freedom during the Cold War) and many other pieces very much in the present, looking at such topics as graduate student rights, the role of corporate influence in higher education, and shifting ideas about faculty governance.
January 27, 2010
Eastfield Collge, in Texas, will let students in its ceramics classes make crosses after all. The college has banned crosses, setting off charges of anti-Christian bias. The college said that the ban wasn't about religion, but about encouraging students to be creative in their work. But facing a threatened lawsuit, the college will allow crosses, The Dallas Morning News reported.
January 27, 2010
Annual gatherings of student learning experts and accrediting officials reveal lots of assessment activity on campuses. But policy makers ponder whether it adds up to meaningful national progress.
January 26, 2010
As White House seeks to regain footing, Obama calls for expanding program designed to keep borrowers' student loan payments in check. But spending freeze likely, too.
January 26, 2010
A leading figure in physics, Andrew Lange of the California Institute of Technology, killed himself last week, leaving many of his colleagues deeply saddened and confused. Last year, Lange won the prestigious Dan David Prize, worth $1 million, in astrophysics.

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