Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

November 23, 2009
Ninety-one percent of faculty members at California State University Stanislaus voted no confidence last week in President Ham Shirvani, The Modesto Bee reported. Faculty leaders stressed that frustration with the president extends beyond the current budget problems in the state. They said that there have been problems with financial management and lack of communication that predate the current crisis. A university vice president said that the vote wasn't a surprise, given how painful budget cuts have been.
November 23, 2009
Faculty members at Oberlin College voted last week to create an online and free archive to which they will add all work they publish in peer reviewed journals. The move, similar to those taken by faculties at several research universities, reflects support for the open access movement in which the paid subscription model for journals is being challenged.
November 23, 2009
The board of the Utah College of Applied Technology has agreed to reconsider its recent presidential hire, admitting that the process in which he was hired broke state rules, The Salt Lake Tribune reported. The board will re-interview Richard Brems and also the other finalist and reconsider the hire. The original decision was improper because the full board did not interview finalists and information about the finalists was not released to the public.
November 23, 2009
Are LeTourneau University undergraduates being robbed of credit for a prosthetic knee they invented? The university thinks so, according to The News-Journal. Time recently praised Stanford University's prosthetic knee as one of the best inventions of the year, and that honor led LeTourneau officials to investigate and to challenge the idea that this was truly a Stanford invention. Stanford officials told the newspaper that its design was unique.
November 23, 2009
Andrew Kniceley has resigned as chair of the Board of Governors of Fairmont State University, following an incident in which he yelled at an assistant football coach when Kniceley's son saw action in only three plays in a football game, The Charleston Gazette reported.
November 23, 2009
The 32 winners of Rhodes Scholarships for this year were announced Saturday night. While the list of their colleges featured many of those that appear regularly, this year's class was the first ever to have a winner from Truman State University.
November 23, 2009
Support groups for male students are starting to appear at British universities -- and while some see them as organizations allowing men to explore issues of masculinity, others fear that they are "just a front for macho activities and beer-drinking marathons," The Guardian reported. Alex Linsley, founder of Man Collective-Oxford, said: "There is so much conflicting information for men.
November 23, 2009
Many financial aid officers are unnerved by mixed messages Washington is sending about the student loan programs. What's a college to do?
November 20, 2009
1.4 percent increase in number of degrees awarded in 2008 is smallest since 2003; growth in biology doctorates accounts for most of the uptick, and humanities continue to dip.
November 20, 2009
The Hope tax credit is designed to help middle class families pay for college -- but not this much. A Treasury Department audit released Thursday found that several hundred thousand taxpayers sought credit in 2006 and 2007 for more than half a billion dollars more than they were supposed to by claiming the tax credit for a third or even a fourth year; it is limited by statute to two years.

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