Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

October 5, 2009
The fallout continues to grow in the basketball scandal at the State University of New York at Binghamton. On Friday, Nancy L. Zimpher, chancellor of the SUNY system, announced that the system -- and not the Binghamton campus, as previously suggested -- would oversee an audit of the basketball program.
October 5, 2009
The University of Wisconsin's medical school, like many medical schools, has been examining conflict of interest rules in the wake of reports about medical researchers' possible conflicts of interest from large speaking or consulting fees they receive from companies whose products they study, The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reported.
October 5, 2009
Last year's collapse on Wall Street has left many state prepaid tuition plans in unhealthy shape, The New York Times reported. Some states are imposing new fees on families, while others are developing scenarios for what to do if they close, and still others are receiving bailouts from their states.
October 5, 2009
The Community College of Allegheny College has ended a rule requiring students seeking to distribute materials on campus to first have the material reviewed by administrators.
October 5, 2009
Stanford University is seeking to sell $1 billion in investment assets, including shares in companies, real estate and timberland, The Wall Street Journal reported. The sales are generally only portions of Stanford's holdings in the investments, and come as the university seeks to recover from substantial endowment losses that have created severe short-term financial difficulties, even though the university has one of the largest endowments in the world.
October 5, 2009
Authorities have arrested three students at the University of California at Los Angeles, and four others, in charges related to a fight at an off-campus fraternity party, the Los Angeles Times reported. Two of the students are charged with attempted murder, and the third is charged as an accessory. While arrests related to fraternity parties are not rare, arrests of students for attempted murder are.
October 5, 2009
Morehouse College has fired a woman and reprimanded another employee over remarks they made in an e-mail mocking a gay wedding, and forwarding the e-mail to others from their Morehouse accounts, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported. Robert M. Franklin, Morehouse's president, has said several times that he believes the college must promote respect for gay people.
October 5, 2009
Stanley O. Ikenberry, former president of the University of Illinois system and of the American Council on Education, was named Saturday as interim president at the University of Illinois, which is recovering from an admissions scandal that led to the resignation of B. Joseph White, who will leave the presidency at the end of the year.
October 5, 2009
Education Management Corporation's initial public offering was priced at the low end of its proposed range Friday, but gained during trading after launch, the Associated Press reported. Education Management is the third education IPO since November, following those of Grand Canyon Education, Inc. and Bridgepoint Education, Inc. Education Management's holdings include the Art Institutes and Argosy University.
October 5, 2009
The Phi Beta Kappa Society has voted to allow four more colleges to create chapters. The society admits new chapters only at its triennial meeting, and this year has accepted applications from Butler University, in Indiana; the College of Saint Benedict-Saint John’s University, in Minnesota; Elon University, in North Carolina; and James Madison University, in Virginia. The honorary society declined to name the colleges that were not successful in their bids to start chapters.

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