Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

To reach this person, click here.

Most Recent Articles

August 12, 2009
The push to simplify the process of applying for federal financial aid has been steadily building momentum, with federal officials (in both of the last two administrations) joining advocates for students and financial aid experts in a show of near unanimity on the idea that procedures and documents (like the Free Application for Federal Student Aid) should not be discouraging students from seeking financial help for college.
August 12, 2009
Security on Campus, a group that pushes for tougher responses to crime on campus, on Tuesday issued a statement saying that a recent ruling by the Education Department's Office for Civil Rights would force colleges to take firmer action against students who harass other students on online gossip sites, even if those sites aren't part of colleges. In the ruling, the department did not directly address that issue, and in fact rejected the complaint in question.
August 12, 2009
The Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, which is best known in higher education for easing the path of community college students into four-year colleges, announced today that it has hired Lawrence Kutner as its new executive director. Kutner, who co-founded and co-directs the Center for Mental Health and Media at Massachusetts General Hospital and lectures on psychology in the psychiatry department at Harvard Medical School, is an expert on child development as well as an author and documentary producer.
August 12, 2009
The following appointments, promotions and other job changes were announced recently by colleges, associations, companies and other organizations that operate in and around higher education. They are among the many such moves that appear in The Lists on Inside Higher Ed, which also includes a comprehensive catalog of upcoming events in higher education.
August 11, 2009
Religiously affiliated groups will now be able to seek student fee money at Boise State University, under an agreement struck with students who sued the institution.
August 11, 2009
The Louisiana lawmaker behind legislation creating a commission to study the state's higher education system laid out an aggressive, and often critical, agenda for the panel at its first meeting in Baton Rouge Monday, The Times-Picayune reported.
August 11, 2009
News abounds about bookstores and other providers (on ground and virtual): reunification at Barnes & Noble, infusion for Academos, expansion for free textbook initiative.
August 11, 2009
Frank T. Brogan, president of Florida Atlantic University, has been selected as chancellor of the State University System of Florida.William (Bill) Ellis, provost and chief academic officer at Hardin-Simmons University, in Texas, has been chosen as president of Howard Payne University, also in Texas.Adam S.
August 10, 2009
Comprehensive survey of colleges' preparedness suggests increasing attention to safety concerns -- but gaps in campus communication and collaboration with local authorities.
August 10, 2009
The University of North Carolina paid $8 million over the last five years in "retreat rights," salaries to help former administrators prepare to return to the classroom, The Raleigh News & Observer reported. In many cases, the salaries were what the officials earned in senior positions, far more than the faculty jobs for which they were preparing.

Pages

Back to Top