Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

March 27, 2009
Opponents of teaching evolution failed Thursday to require Texas schools to teach the "weaknesses" of evolutionary theory, but they succeeded in votes requiring specific parts of evolutionary theory to be questioned in classrooms, The Dallas Morning News reported.
March 27, 2009
TIAA-CREF on Thursday announced a tougher position on several companies that have been accused of supporting the authorities who encourage the genocide in Darfur. Some groups have pushed TIAA-CREF to immediately sell such holdings, arguing that genocide is such a terrible wrong that any holdings in such companies are immoral. TIAA-CREF didn't go that far.
March 27, 2009
The University of Wisconsin at Madison is proposing a surcharge on all students from family incomes of at least $80,000 to pay for needed services oriented toward undergraduate education that current levels of state support don't cover. The Madison Initiative for Undergraduates would pay for 75 additional faculty slots, plus improved student services. "Both cost and quality are important to our students and their families," said Biddy Martin, the chancellor, in explaining the concept.
March 27, 2009
Russel Ogden will be able to resume his research on assisted suicide, according to a settlement announced by the Canadian Association of University Teachers. Ogden, a sociologist at Kwantlen Polytechnic University, has written about assisted suicides and observed many of them. An ethics review board at his university had approved the research, but Kwantlen ordered him to stop any studies that involved observing suicides.
March 27, 2009
Carol Vallone, who was CEO of WebCT before it was acquired by Blackboard, has become acting CEO of Wimba, a company that focuses on software that promotes group learning in higher education (and elementary and secondary education). Vallone, who has been on the Wimba board, said that no decision had been made on whether she might become CEO permanently.
March 27, 2009
What is tenure and what should you know about the tenure process when starting an academic career?
March 27, 2009
That depends on where your college is. As states decide how to spend tens of billions in federal funds, higher education stands to benefit in some states, but get shortchanged in New York and elsewhere.
March 26, 2009
A U.S. appeals court -- the fourth to do so -- rules that future doctors are not automatically ineligible for student exemption from payroll taxes.
March 26, 2009
John Hope Franklin -- a leading historian during the last century and a pioneer in African-American studies -- died Wednesday at the age of 94. Franklin was the James B. Duke Professor Emeritus of History at Duke University, and earlier in his career he taught at historically black colleges such as Fisk and Howard Universities. He also taught at institutions such as Brooklyn College and the University of Chicago, in an era when black professors were rare outside of black colleges.
March 26, 2009
Democratic leaders in the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives took starkly different approaches Wednesday to the budget resolutions they are required to draft to lay out their chambers' plans to craft federal budgets for the 2010 fiscal year. But the plans shared one common element that could bode well for college students.

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