Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

July 17, 2009
Thirty-four Nobel Laureates on Thursday issued a joint statement calling on Congress to adopt President Obama proposed $150 billion Clean Energy Technology Fund in the climate legislation it is considering. The climate bill approved by the House in June falls far short of this goal, endangering the goal of conducting research on a variety of topics related to climate change, according to the statement.
July 17, 2009
India, which has historically discouraged colleges from outside the country from setting up operations there, has been moving to change that policy and invite institutions in. But government officials are now saying that such operations would have to abide by strict quotas that specify the number of places for members of disadvantaged castes, The Times of India reported.
July 16, 2009
Democratic leaders in the House of Representatives on Wednesday formally introduced legislation to restructure the federal student aid programs and signaled their intention to move with lightning speed to pass it.
July 16, 2009
Colleges, universities and schools are expecting an average decline in gift value of 3.9 percent when the books are closed on the 2008-9 academic year, according to a survey of senior fund raisers being released today by the Council for Advancement and Support of Education. Looking to 2009-10, those surveyed project a modest increase of 2.5 percent. Over the last 20 years, the average annual rate of growth for giving to education has been 7.1 percent.
July 16, 2009
The National Collegiate Athletic Association requires members colleges to make sure athletes have health insurance before competing. But an analysis in The New York Times noted that the NCAA doesn't specify the quality or extent of insurance coverage, leaving many athletes surprised and angry that they must handle large bills, without assistance, for athletic injuries.
July 16, 2009
Underground animal rights activists issued a statement Wednesday claiming credit for having vandalized the home of researcher at the University of California at Irvine, by spray-painting "KILLER" across his garage door and pouring red paint on three of his cars.
July 16, 2009
Assumption College, in Massachusetts, has announced that it is dropping the requirement that applicants submit SAT or ACT scores. College officials said that they acted only after conducting a study of four years of admissions data that found that high school grades were a better predictor of college success than test scores.
July 15, 2009
A federal judge has issued an injunction barring the Los Angeles Community College District from using parts of its sexual harassment policy, which are being challenged in court as too vague, too broad, and too easy to use to squelch free speech.
July 15, 2009
The U.S. Education Department has told Pennsylvania Gov. Ed Rendell that he needs to apply again for education stimulus funds because he left out of the application four "state related" institutions, The Philadelphia Inquirer reported.
July 15, 2009
Washington University in St. Louis has told a Senate committee that Timothy K. Kuklo, a physician who is on leave from the university, failed to report for a year his ties to Medtronic even as he was conducting company-sponsored research, The New York Times reported. Kuklo is at the center of a controversy over research that has since been discredited amid allegations he falsified parts of a study. Kuklo has declined to comment on the situation, or the Washington University finding.

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