Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

March 4, 2009
As House appropriators examine boom in federal research money and foresee more, they weigh priorities and techniques for avoiding mistakes of the past.
March 3, 2009
New signs of the economic difficulties facing all kinds of colleges: Administrators and staff members at John Carroll University are being required to take two weeks of unpaid leave, while faculty members are being asked to vote on a proposal to cut their salaries, The Plain Dealer of Cleveland reported. ...
March 3, 2009
Chris Hardy finished all of his courses at Brigham Young University, but he has been denied a degree and recently lost his appeal of that decision, all due to a calendar he created. The Associated Press reported that Hardy was found to have violated the university's honor code because he created "Men on a Mission," a beefcake calendar featuring men in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.
March 3, 2009
The University of Portland, in Oregon, has changed its policies so that the institution grants amnesty on drinking-related matters to students who come forward to report that they have been sexually assaulted, the Willamette Week reported. Many colleges have such exemptions so that students who may have been drinking prior to an incident -- in violation of campus rules and drinking-age laws -- won't feel discouraged from reporting a rape or assault. But until recently, Portland didn't have such an exemption.
March 3, 2009
As White House defends itself against cries of hypocrisy, colleges prepare to benefit from hundreds of millions in earmarked projects from lawmakers.
March 2, 2009
A leading Congressional Republican is asking Education Secretary Arne Duncan for significantly more information about how the department plans to spend $100 billion in new funds from the economic stimulus package and to monitor how the money is used. Rep. Howard P. (Buck) McKeon wrote Duncan last week to ask how the department will oversee the flow of funds to states and the effectiveness with which states spend the money.
March 2, 2009
Alumni of Western Washington University, angry over the university's decision to eliminate football, issued a statement Monday saying that the university has refused offers of gifts of $1 million to restore football -- and that, as a result, many alumni plan to stop giving to the institution. The university responded by stating that many alumni understand the decision. "Western cannot accept donations for the football program since that program no longer exists," the university said.
March 2, 2009
Southwestern College, in California, is under fire for a deal in which some of its police academy students are being trained at a facility run by the company previously known as Blackwater, the controversial company known for its security work in Iraq, The Union-Tribune reported.
March 2, 2009
Benedictine University has a new way to help its alumni pay for their children's college tuitions. When alumni have two children who enroll at the Illinois university within a six-year period, the second child receives a 50 percent discount on tuition. A third child doesn't have to pay any tuition at all. Benedictine is not the first institution to offer a sibling scholarship.
March 2, 2009
When Bill Ayers visits a local campus these days, it's become common for a local politician or two to denounce the appearance. But Republican lawmakers in Pennsylvania are pushing particularly hard at Millersville University, demanding that a lecture later this month be called off. The Intelligencer Journal reported that Republican legislators have issued repeated statements and called for meetings with state higher education officials about the matter.

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