Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

October 27, 2009
In discrimination suit against Cornell labor school, U.S. appeals panel finds that letting an instructor's contract lapse is an "adverse employment action."
October 27, 2009
Southwestern College, a community college outside San Diego, has been under fire since last week's suspension of four faculty members, following a protest that criticized the administration. With professors saying that they are being punished for expressing their views, the college late Monday issued a new statement -- but that statement (while noting that one suspension has been lifted) only further angered the professors.
October 27, 2009
Carnegie Mellon University must defend itself against charges that it fraudulently and negligently misrepresented the state of its research on microwave technology to an investor who lost millions on the work, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit ruled Monday.
October 27, 2009
In 2005, Syracuse University created MayFest, a one-day festival of academic events, with regular classes called off for the day. The Syracuse Post-Standard reported that students responded by organizing massive off-campus parties on that day. So this year, the university has renamed the event -- and will not cancel classes.
October 27, 2009
The following meetings, conferences, seminars and other events will be held in the coming weeks in and around higher education. They are among the many such that appear in our calendar on The Lists on Inside Higher Ed, which also includes a comprehensive catalog of job changes in higher education. This listing will appear as a regular feature in this space.
October 26, 2009
Idaho State University lacks sufficient evidence to justify the termination of a tenured professor charged with a pattern of abusive and disruptive behavior, a faculty panel ruled Friday. Habib Sadid, an engineering professor who has been at Idaho State for more than 20 years, was suspended and barred from campus in August. Sadid has challenged administrators publicly, and in 2005 he organized a no-confidence vote in the university's former president, who later resigned amid protests about his compensation.
October 26, 2009
A marine conservationist who has battled with -- and, it appears, lost to -- the University of Alaska and National Sea Grant Program officials over his perceived advocacy and access to grant money says he will leave the university. Rick Steiner had accused Sea Grant officials of pressuring Alaska administrators to strip federal funds from Steiner, citing work that they considered to be inappropriate advocacy for a federal extension agent, and blamed university officials for caving to the pressure.
October 26, 2009
The University of the Free State, a South African institution, has been facing intense criticism over an announcement that it would readmit four white students whose racist videos -- showing the humiliation of black students -- set off a huge debate in the country. The university had said that the decision would be one of racial reconciliation. But now officials are reconsidering.
October 26, 2009
Faculty members at the University of Oregon -- frustrated by their salary levels and dealings with the administration -- have invited the American Association of University Professors and the American Federation of Teachers to organize the professors there, The Eugene Register-Guard reported. The two groups are exploring a drive to organize faculty members at Oregon State University.
October 26, 2009
Harvard University is investigating how a coffee maker in one of its medical school buildings became tainted with a potentially deadly preservative used in many laboratories, The Boston Globe reported. Six people who had coffee made there were hospitalized in August, although all were back to work after a day or two.

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