Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

August 7, 2009
The U.S. Education Department on Thursday proposed new regulations to carry out changes that Congress made last year to federal law governing higher education accreditation.
August 7, 2009
The board of Wheeling Jesuit University has fired the West Virginia college's president, the Rev. Julio Giulietti, just two years after he was named to the post, The Wheeling News-Register reported. While details were not available, Father Guilietti told the newspaper he would sue. He said: "I was surprised that the board president pushed for a vote on this before my evaluation was half completed.
August 7, 2009
Los Angeles City College, facing deep budget cuts, is suspending six of its seven athletics teams, the Los Angeles Times reported. Women's volleyball will continue because the season is about to start.
August 7, 2009
Providence College is going to the Rhode Island Supreme Court to appeal an order that the college turn over documents related to the 2002 death of 19-year-old student who slipped off of a dormitory rooftop, The Providence Journal reported. A judge had ordered release of the documents as part of a wrongful death suit by the student's father.
August 7, 2009
Harvard University has licensed its name for use by a designer clothing company that will soon be selling a "Harvard Yard" line, Bloomberg reported. While financial terms were not revealed, the clothing line may relate more to the university's desire to replenish its endowment. While Harvard has made a point in recent years of stressing that it is open to students of all economic means, the same may not be said of the clothing.
August 7, 2009
TUI University gave $923,000 in aid to students who had not qualified for it, Education Department audit concludes; institution challenges the findings.
August 6, 2009
Jerome F. Alley, educational standards evaluator for the Distance Education and Training Council, has been chosen as president of William Howard Taft University, in California.Michael Amiridis, dean of the College of Engineering and Computing at the University of South Carolina at Columbia, has been promoted to vice president for academic affairs and provost there.Lorne M.
August 6, 2009
One focus of the investigation into the University of Illinois admissions scandal has been the way the Urbana-Champaign chancellor and others pressured the law school to admit politically connected applicants who wouldn't have stood much of a chance without that help.
August 6, 2009
The University of California -- in intense budget-cutting mode because of the state's fiscal mess -- is about to lend the state nearly $200 million. But as The San Francisco Chronicle reported, the loans aren't charity, but an attempt to get university building projects moving again.
August 6, 2009
A second black faculty member at Harvard University has come forward to detail what he calls racial bias that led to his arrest by the Cambridge police outside his home, The Boston Globe reported. In this case of assault and battery charges, the professor -- S. Allen Counter of the medical school -- was acquitted. Counter said he hasn't previously gone public with the story out of fear that the police would harass him.

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