Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

To reach this person, click here.

Most Recent Articles

July 13, 2009
What amounts to good news for endowment managers these days wouldn't have been good news a few years ago. But Bloomberg reported that several colleges with large endowments are finding that their losses for the fiscal year just ended are slightly smaller than projected and several that expected the current fiscal year to produce more losses are now projecting a flat year.
July 13, 2009
The Nevada Board of Regents on Friday ended David Ashley's presidency at the University of Nevada at Las Vegas, returning him to the faculty, The Las Vegas Sun reported. Regents cited Ashley's lobbying of legislators, whom he told that UNLV was being disproportionately cut in the budget process. While Ashley said he was doing his job to protect the campus, and student leaders agreed, regents said that he undermined the unity of the state higher education system.
July 13, 2009
If all goes according to plan, Simon Fraser University, in British Columbia, will be the first Canadian member of the National Collegiate Athletic Association.
July 13, 2009
With big changes looming, a flurry of news developments -- action and promises from Congress, reports on Perkins Loans and guarantee agencies -- add to the uncertainty.
July 10, 2009
Menahem Ben-Sasson, professor of the history of the Jewish people at Hebrew University of Jerusalem, in Israel, has been named president there.Pamela Benoit, vice provost for advanced studies and dean of the Graduate School at the University of Missouri at Columbia, has been chosen as executive vice president and provost at Ohio University.
July 10, 2009
Overwhelming majorities of Americans believe that science has had a positive impact on society and that science has made life easier for most people, but Americans don't think as highly of American science as do scientists. Those are the among the results from a survey released Thursday by the Pew Research Center for the People and the Press, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science.
July 10, 2009
Massachusetts Attorney General Martha Coakley has concluded that Suffolk University didn't break the law, but also didn't follow its own rules when it authorized contracts with a trustee's lobbying firm, The Boston Globe reported.
July 10, 2009
The University of Texas at Austin and the University of Wisconsin at Madison have expanded their deals with Google Books over digitization of their library collections. The agreements concern Google's project to digitize library collections -- a program controversial in some quarters and praised elsewhere. Under the revised agreements, people nationally will be able to preview collections at the two universities and to buy online access to the books.
July 10, 2009
This week’s hearing about the Bowl Championship Series on Capitol Hill may have been much ado about nothing. After its officials argued before Sen. Orrin G. Hatch, Republican from Utah, that the method by which the college football national champion is determined violates federal antitrust law, the Mountain West Conference has agreed to sign a contract extension to keep the system in place for another five years.
July 10, 2009
First James Franco was criticized by some students at the University of California at Los Angeles for not having enough gravitas to be named as commencement speaker. Then the actor was criticized by many others for withdrawing as speaker at the last minute.

Pages

Back to Top