Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

March 2, 2009
When Bill Ayers visits a local campus these days, it's become common for a local politician or two to denounce the appearance. But Republican lawmakers in Pennsylvania are pushing particularly hard at Millersville University, demanding that a lecture later this month be called off. The Intelligencer Journal reported that Republican legislators have issued repeated statements and called for meetings with state higher education officials about the matter.
March 2, 2009
Adjunct professors, who teach almost one-third of courses at Weber State University, can expect a 7 percent cut in their pay next year, The Ogden Standard reported. University officials announced the plan, and said that adjunct pay would be rolled back to its 2004-5 rates, or about $2,700 per course. Adjuncts at the Utah university do not receive benefits. The state is considering large cuts to higher education budgets, and Weber State officials cited those reductions as requiring the pay cuts.
March 2, 2009
Northwestern president asks colleagues to back law schools' push to end accreditor's requirement on faculty tenure.
March 1, 2009
States should spend the federal money they receive for higher education from the economic stimulus package in ways that encourage innovation and greater efficiency rather than reinforcing the patterns that got their college systems into trouble in the past, three groups argue in a report released Friday. The Delta Project on Postsecondary Education Costs, Productivity, and Accountability, the National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education, and the National Center for Higher Education Manage
March 1, 2009
Safety inspectors found more than a dozen deficiencies in a University of California at Los Angeles laboratory in which a lab assistant was engulfed in flames in a December accident that resulted in burns that killed her, the Los Angeles Times reported.
February 28, 2009
The College of Santa Fe, a private college known for its arts programs and close faculty-student interaction, has for months been facing closure and hoping for a a bailout from a state university, most likely New Mexico Highlands University.
February 27, 2009
A parody issue of a student newspaper at the University of Oxford has cost its editors their jobs.
February 27, 2009
Goucher College has decided to let Leopold Munyakazi, a visiting French professor who was suspended after Goucher officials learned he is accused of participating in the genocide in Rwanda, use the college library, The Baltimore Sun reported. Munyakazi denies participating in genocide and some human rights experts are skeptical of the charges he faces.
February 27, 2009
The 2010 budget blueprint released by the Obama administration Thursday was decidedly bare bones, lacking detailed numbers for most federal programs and clocking in at about one-tenth the normal number of pages of explanatory material. But while the administration's proposal might have skimped on specifics, its proposal for the Education Department had no shortage of blockbuster ideas that, taken together, would begin to radically transform federal higher education programs.
February 26, 2009
Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Pittsburgh together had about $114 million in investments under the control of Westridge Capital Management, whose managers have been charged with swindling $500 million from the fund to support lavish spending habits, including spending on teddy bears, horses and rare books, The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reported. The two universities are trying to determine their losses and their options.

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