Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

September 30, 2009
Raymond Vance Fulkerson, facing 15 counts of sexual misconduct involving 13 alleged victims, has resigned his tenured position as theater professor at the University of Northern Colorado, The Denver Post reported. University officials said that they did not pay Fulkerson to quit, and that he will receive only the standard benefits, such as retirement accounts, to which he would normally be entitled. The university is also investigating Fulkerson.
September 30, 2009
Increasing numbers of young Americans are choosing to enter postsecondary education through community colleges -- but too many of them are having to work and attend part time and too few of them are leaving with degrees as a result, the think tank Demos argues in a report released Tuesday.
September 30, 2009
With journals -- including back issues -- widely available in digital form, many college and university libraries are weighing whether they need to devote extensive shelf space to print copies.
September 30, 2009
A federal judge has ordered a Lawrence, Kan., store owner to pay the University of Kansas more than $660,000 for repeatedly infringing on its trademark by selling t-shirts and other apparel promoting the university's sports teams, the Lawrence Journal-World reported. The court's finding represents the second time that the U.S.
September 30, 2009
Scores of students protested at Bethune-Cookman University Tuesday after a sprinkler system went off in a dormitory and the students weren't allowed back in, The Orlando Sentinel reported. Some television stations called the incident a riot, but other reports said that was a stretch. But the Sentinel did report that at one point, students were charging toward a dean's office, and that someone threw a chair through a window.
September 30, 2009
Students who live at Dunster House at Harvard University are angry that bars have been placed in front of the rare books in the Dunster library, preventing anyone from handling the books, with at least one graduate student suggesting that the change appeared to be an "anti-intellectual" move.
September 30, 2009
Some college presidents work hard to set examples for students. At Northampton Community College, in Pennsylvania, Arthur Scott not only got a flu shot, but let himself be filmed doing so (with the video going to YouTube) to encourage students to get the shots. Meanwhile, Jeff Olson of North Arkansas College is trying to publicize a new lottery in the state that will support college scholarships.
September 29, 2009
Matthew Healey, a freshman at Miami University, appears to be the fourth student to have died from H1N1 complications during this academic year. The Boston Globe reported that Healey, who is from Massachusetts, and his three roommates all contracted H1N1, but that the roommates recovered quickly.
September 29, 2009
The president of Radford University, Penelope Kyle, has offered to reverse two layoffs of student services administrators, following widespread objections by student and faculty leaders to both the original layoff decision and the way it was carried out, The Roanoke Times reported. While deep budget cuts in Virginia have made campus cuts no surprise, the elimination of the jobs of the two officials, both seen as key figures on campus, stunned many at Radford.
September 29, 2009
In a key win for literary scholars who work with the estates of authors, the estate of James Joyce has agreed to give $240,000 in legal fees to Carol Shloss, who in a 2007 settlement, ending years of litigation, won the right to use certain materials in her biography of Joyce's daughter. Schloss was assisted in her legal fight by the Stanford Law School Center for Internet and Society's Fair Use Project. In a statement, Shloss said: "It's a breakthrough, not just for me but for everybody who has to deal with a literary estate. This has been going on for decades.

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