Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

April 7, 2009
The previous winners predicted by Inside Higher Ed's perennial Academic Performance Tournament bracket have historically flamed out in a relatively early round, given that they were required to advance through the real NCAA Division I men's basketball tournament on the basis of their on-the-court skill, not how the teams have performed on the Academic Progress Rate, the NCAA's main measure of teams' academic success, as in our version of the tourney.
April 7, 2009
Students at the University of Maryland at College Park weren't going to let a little threat from a state legislator stand in the way, though they modified their plans a bit. After campus administrators canceled a planned showing of a pornographic movie, "Pirates II: Stagnetti's Revenge," in the wake of a state legislator's threat to to cut off funds to the institution, student leaders showed excerpts of the movie amid a discussion of free speech on Monday night.
April 7, 2009
Sallie Mae announced Monday that it would create 2,000 jobs in the United States by bringing back to the country call center, technology and other workers that the student loan provider has spread across the globe in recent years. "The current economic environment has caused our communities to struggle with job losses," Albert L. Lord, Sallie Mae's chief executive officer, said in a news release. “We also contribute economically to the many communities where we operate our business.
April 7, 2009
Community college students on academic probation who were required to take "college success" courses were more likely to return to good academic standing than were those who participated in a voluntary alternative, according to a new study by MDRC.
April 7, 2009
Constantine Papadakis, who transformed Drexel U. and earned fans and critics along the way, dies suddenly.
April 6, 2009
For the fifth time in nine years, the University of Maryland Baltimore County won the national college chess championship Sunday, the Baltimore Sun reported.
April 6, 2009
The University of California at San Francisco has told medical faculty members that they cannot spend more than $75 in university money on a bottle of wine at a recruitment dinner or other official event, The San Francisco Chronicle reported. A by-the-glass limit of $15 was also set. A spokesman said that most professors understand the need to limit such spending, but that there have been periodic incidents that prompted the new rules.
April 6, 2009
The U.S. Education Department on Friday awarded $150 million in grants to help 27 states develop or upgrade longitudinal student data systems to track academic progress. While most of the grants, which range from $2.5 million to $9 million, are focused on data systems for elementary and secondary schools, many of them are aimed at helping to integrate the systems with postsecondary education systems or to allow data from the systems to be shared with college officials.
April 6, 2009
The diocese of Scranton is asking four local Roman Catholic colleges to turn over documents related to student health services to provide "assurance" that the institutions are not providing or encouraging birth control, The Republican-Herald reported. The request followed a report in the student newspaper of St.
April 6, 2009
Arts groups and educators are protesting recent notices sent to a dozen fine arts instructors at Parsons the New School for Design, telling them that they will not be teaching next semester, The New York Times reported. Because Parsons relies on part-time instructors for fine arts courses, some see the move as destroying any sense of job security at the institution. Further, the move comes at a time of faculty and student anger over management of the New School, of which Parsons is a part.

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