Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

November 3, 2009
The fight over academic boycotts of Israel -- which has been centered in Britain -- has shifted to Norway, The Jerusalem Post reported. The board of the Norwegian University of Science and Technology will consider a boycott proposal this month, at the request of professors. Israeli academic leaders are organizing a campaign against the plan.
November 3, 2009
The cities (and colleges campuses) we see in the movies are not always what they claim to be -- and that doesn't go over well with students at Johns Hopkins University. The Social Network is currently being filmed at Hopkins, which is in effect playing the part of Harvard, which doesn't permit commercial films to be shot on its campus.
November 3, 2009
Center for American Progress, which has Obama's ear, proposes data-driven consumer protection office to safeguard students' interest in higher education.
November 2, 2009
Idaho State University has fired Habib Sadid, a tenured engineering professor who had been suspended, the Associated Press reported. A faculty panel recently released an opinion that there was not enough evidence to justify Sadid's dismissal, but the university president said that his ouster was in the best interests of the institution.
November 2, 2009
The tenure denials of four women at DePaul University are leading to student protests and threats of legal action, the Chicago Tribune reported. Of 33 professors who went up for tenure this year, seven were rejected, five of whom were women. In the cases of four represented by the same lawyer, departmental reviews were quite positive, but a university-wide committee -- with professors in other fields -- raised questions about the candidacies.
November 2, 2009
Students at Lincoln University in Pennsylvania have been protesting lack of access to a library, poor food service, and the way police treated a student who organized their protests, The Philadelphia Daily News reported. The student -- who was inspired to get more vocal after finding a moth in her salad at the university cafeteria -- staged an 11-day hunger strike over the issues.
November 2, 2009
Samim Anghaie, and his wife, Susan, were arrested Friday and charged with fraud for using $3.7 million in government contracts for personal uses, such as the purchase of cars and homes, The Gainesville Sun reported. The two are also charged with submitting false information to get the contracts from various federal agencies. Samim Anghaie has been director of Florida's Innovative Nuclear Space Power and Propulsion Institute.
November 2, 2009
Just weeks after releasing its latest ranking of universities worldwide, and receiving some criticism over the methodology, The Times Higher announced a new partner for the project and a decision to revisit the methodology.
November 2, 2009
St. Petersburg State University has clarified rules -- of concern to many scholars -- about who must seek approval before presenting or publishing work abroad, The New York Times reported. Researchers in the humanities and social sciences will not be covered by the regulations.
October 30, 2009
Just under 11.5 million students were enrolled in a college or university in the fall of 2008, and 39.6 percent of all Americans aged 18 to 24 were enrolled -- both figures that set records, according to an analysis released Thursday by the Pew Research Center. Community college enrollments accounted for almost all of the gains over the previous year, consistent with the enrollment booms they experience when the economy falters.

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