Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

September 25, 2009
Jehuda Reinharz announced Thursday that he will step down as president of Brandeis University after the end of the current academic year or when a successor is selected. The university's announcement listed many accomplishments of his 15-year tenure as president and included glowing praise from trustee leaders.
September 25, 2009
The U.S. Senate approved legislation Thursday that would give the National Endowments for the Humanities and the Arts $161.3 million each in the 2010 fiscal year, $6.3 million more than the two agencies are receiving this year. The legislation, which provides funds for the Interior Department and numerous other agencies, also includes funds for tribal college programs through the Bureau of Indian Affairs.
September 25, 2009
The U.S. Education Department's Family Policy Compliance Office has published guidance for colleges and universities on their obligations for reporting information about their students when the U.S. Census Bureau comes calling on their campuses for the 2010 population census.
September 25, 2009
When teams are winning and things are good, sports programs can bring colleges and universities publicity they couldn't afford to buy. But it cuts the other way, too, as the University of Kansas and the State University of New York at Binghamton are learning -- painfully -- right now. Both universities have been embarrassed in recent days by the high-profile misbehavior of their athletes, leading to broader questioning about priorities.
September 25, 2009
Idaho State University asked the chair of the physics department to quit as chair (while allowing him to stay on as a faculty member) for allowing a professor from Ecuador to teach without a proper visa, the Associated Press reported. The faculty member from Ecuador had taught legally at another college, but university officials said he didn't have Idaho State listed as an approved employer.
September 25, 2009
John Jay College of Criminal Justice was forced Thursday to close one of its buildings because of its bedbug "condition" (not "infestation," a campus spokesman insisted). President Jeremy Travis said the Manhattan college had brought in an outside company to treat North Hall, and that all classes and operations in the building would be moved elsewhere on the campus until Monday.
September 24, 2009
B. Joseph White announced Wednesday that he is quitting as president of the University of Illinois System. White has been under fire for months over a scandal in which separate admissions systems were used for the Urbana-Champaign campus for politically connected applicants.
September 24, 2009
H1N1 and flu-like illnesses are still on the rise on campuses, according to data released Wednesday by the American College Health Association. The association has been using a national sample of colleges to track the spread of H1N1. Ninety-one percent of the 267 colleges and universities reported new cases in the last week, compared to 83 percent the prior week. The nationwide attack rate was 24.7 cases per 10,000 students, 15 percent higher than the prior week’s rate. Details of the weekly report may be found here.
September 24, 2009
A majority of financial aid officers reported increases of 10 percent or more in the numbers of students applying for financial aid and receiving Pell Grants at their institutions, according to a survey released Wednesday by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators.
September 24, 2009
Is Emerson College the most crime-ridden college in the United States? The Daily Beast appears to think so, but not everyone agrees. The Daily Beast, Tina Brown's new Web site, ranked all colleges based on per capita crimes in federal reports, as well as other factors, and Emerson led the list.

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