Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

October 6, 2009
Colleges that play big-time basketball set ticket prices for their men's teams significantly higher than for their women's teams, and the differential seems to be explained at least partially by institutional discrimination, says a new paper published by the Wellesley Centers for Women at Wellesley College.
October 6, 2009
The Obama administration on Monday said it was concerned about a Senate spending bill that would provide about $200 million less for the National Science Foundation and the National Institute of Standards and Technology than President Obama has sought.
October 6, 2009
Amazon is famous for a lot of things, but foremost among them is the customer reviews that are appended to virtually every product it sells (the company went so far as to patent its approach).
October 6, 2009
Following a series of controversies, including the murder trial in Italy of one of its students, the University of Washington has tightened rules for study abroad, The Seattle Post-Intelligencer reported. Among the new rules: Department chairs must sign off on study abroad programs, students must have insurance and a cell phone, and program funds can't be used to buy alcohol.
October 6, 2009
Australia's government has issued a report criticizing its treatment of foreign students, and noting that violent attacks on some Indian students have damaged the country's reputation with potential students, Bloomberg reported.
October 5, 2009
Elizabeth H. Blackburn, Carol W. Greider and Jack W. Szostak were named winners of the 2009 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine this morning for the discovery of "how chromosomes are protected by telomeres and the enzyme telomerase." Blackburn and Greider are the 9th and 10th women to win Nobels in medicine.
October 5, 2009
The fallout continues to grow in the basketball scandal at the State University of New York at Binghamton. On Friday, Nancy L. Zimpher, chancellor of the SUNY system, announced that the system -- and not the Binghamton campus, as previously suggested -- would oversee an audit of the basketball program.
October 5, 2009
The University of Wisconsin's medical school, like many medical schools, has been examining conflict of interest rules in the wake of reports about medical researchers' possible conflicts of interest from large speaking or consulting fees they receive from companies whose products they study, The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reported.
October 5, 2009
Last year's collapse on Wall Street has left many state prepaid tuition plans in unhealthy shape, The New York Times reported. Some states are imposing new fees on families, while others are developing scenarios for what to do if they close, and still others are receiving bailouts from their states.
October 5, 2009
The Community College of Allegheny College has ended a rule requiring students seeking to distribute materials on campus to first have the material reviewed by administrators.

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