Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

March 11, 2010
Erskine College sued the Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church Wednesday accusing the religious denomination that created the college of violating its bylaws and attempting to gain inappropriate control, The Index Journal reported. A judge issued a temporary restraining order against the church, blocking it from taking actions against Erskine, pending further hearings. The legal action results from last week's move by the college to fire board members of the college.
March 11, 2010
Iowa State University is considering a change in its policy on the dismissal of tenured faculty members, The Omaha World-Herald reported. Currently, tenured faculty members may be dismissed only in cases of "extraordinary financial crisis," but a proposed change would also permit dismissals if their programs are eliminated.
March 11, 2010
The Council of Chief State School Officers and the National Governors Association on Wednesday published a draft of proposed "common core standards" that are designed to help states reach consensus on what it means to be "college ready." Most states have agreed in principle to embrace the standards
March 11, 2010
Bart Hildreth, dean of the Andrew Young School of Policy Studies at Georgia State University, said that he was told to resign for speaking out against the idea of merging the school with another college at the university, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported. Georgia's public colleges are currently in the midst of considering a range of proposals to deal with deep budget cuts that they face already -- and the prospect of still more on the way.
March 11, 2010
Eleven former athletes have joined a suit against the National Collegiate Athletic Association over the use of their likenesses without their authorization, The New York Times reported. While the additional plaintiffs do not change the legal issues, the lawyers involved in the suit say that this bolsters their case -- a contention disputed by the NCAA.
March 11, 2010
The Education Writers Association honored Inside Higher Ed with first prize for beat reporting for a series of articles about college rankings.
March 10, 2010
Michael Oren, Israel's ambassador to the United States, says he hasn't given up on the University of California at Irvine. His appearance at Irvine last month set off a wide debate about civility and protest when his talk was repeatedly interrupted by protesters. Now Oren has published an open letter in the university's student newspaper offering to come back to Irvine.
March 10, 2010
Colleges may be freezing many salaries this year, but a new athletic competition has emerged in the salaries of top assistant football coaches, USA Today reported. Last year, only two assistant coaches earned more than $650,000, but this year, six will be earning at least $700,000. And nearly a dozen universities have signed contracts increasing the compensation for offensive or defensive coordinators by at least 38 percent.
March 10, 2010
Community colleges in Nebraska have reached a compromise over a funding dispute that led Metropolitan Community College, in Omaha, to sue the state's five other community colleges, The Omaha World-Herald reported. Metro State has argued that the state's funding formulas favor rural institutions unfairly.
March 10, 2010
Jackson State University's president, Ronald Mason Jr., has received considerable public criticism for his idea of merging the state's three public, historically black universities into one.

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