Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

August 27, 2009
The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs exercised the nuclear option in its continuing dispute with the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, opting out of its five-year, $75 million contract for Gulf War syndrome research after just two years. The V.A.
August 27, 2009
As threatened, Paul Quinn College sued the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools late Tuesday, the Dallas Morning News reported.
August 27, 2009
Brigham Young University at Hawaii has been penalized by the Division II Committee on Infractions for violating four sets of National Collegiate Athletic Association rules. The committee report, released Wednesday, notes that the institution allowed eight transfer athletes to compete before they were academically eligible.
August 27, 2009
California must adopt a more standardized statewide system of student transfer if it is to produce enough college graduates to fill its work force, says a new report, which points to structures in other states as models.
August 27, 2009
The University of Wisconsin at Madison has ended sponsorship agreements with two major brewing companies after a campus panel recommended that banning beer ads from football broadcasts would help the fight against binge drinking, the Associated Press reported. The deals with MillerCoors and Anheuser-Busch InBev had brought the university $425,000 a year, and Badger sports officials had vigorously argued for sustaining the agreements (and the revenues).
August 27, 2009
Death of Edward M. Kennedy leaves gaping hole in federal higher education policy arena. In today's political environment, can anyone else step in? And if so, who?
August 26, 2009
Midyear review of federal budget situation shows price of Obama Pell Grant proposal rising by $27 billion, potentially putting other administration priorities at risk.
August 26, 2009
Ginny Carney, interim president at Leech Lake Tribal College, in Minnesota, has been appointed to the job on a permanent basis.Vicki Golich, professor of political science and dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at California State University at San Marcos, has been appointed as provost and vice president for academic affairs at Metropolitan State College of Denver.
August 26, 2009
Sen. Edward M. Kennedy died late Tuesday night. In his role as Senate chairman of the committee with oversight of many key education and research programs, he was influential in the creation of many them and in the (largely successful) fights to block elimination of them when some sought to do so. Kennedy pushed to add funds for low-income students in a variety of measures. He was also active in efforts to defend affirmative action, to create Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, to encourage national service, and to add funds for biomedical research.
August 26, 2009
Louisiana has a committee that is studying the future of higher education in the state. But as that panel is just beginning its work, another state commission is weighing in, reviving the long-debated idea of having all public colleges in the state overseen by one governing board, The Advocate of Baton Rouge reported.

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