Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

December 16, 2009
An organization that seeks tougher enforcement of immigration laws is suing Texas over a state law that gives in-state tuition rates to some students who lack the documentation to show that they have the legal right to live in the United States, The Houston Chronicle reported. The suit charges that the law violates federal statutes, but defenders argue that there is no such federal ban. The suit says that at least 8,000 students currently benefit from the law.
December 16, 2009
The barrage of dueling entreaties and warnings about the future of the federal student loans continued Tuesday, as four leading Congressional Republicans told college presidents in a letter that "the elimination of the [Federal Family Education Loan Program] is not imminent" because "there remains widespread, bipartisan
December 16, 2009
Eastfield College is being sued for allegedly violating the religious freedom of students in a ceramics class by barring them from making crosses in the class, WFAA News reported. The Texas community college says that the class bans many relatively common objects students might create -- including Christmas items, dog bowls, and mugs with names of states or football teams -- not to limit religious expression, but to encourage student creativity.
December 15, 2009
The acting inspector general of the U.S. Education Department said in a letter Monday that her office would investigate Republican charges that senior department officials inappropriately encouraged college officials to support the proposed elimination of the Federal Family Education Loan Program. In asking the inspector general last month to conduct the review, Rep.
December 15, 2009
Stanford University has decided not to try to sell about $5 billion in endowment assets in an auction, determining that these assets are starting to show gains in value, The Wall Street Journal reported. The planned sale was seen as a sign of how challenging wealthy universities were finding the market at a time that they hold many illiquid assets.
December 15, 2009
The Big Ten Conference will today announce that it is considering adding a 12th member, the Chicago Tribune reported.
December 15, 2009
Gov. Jim Doyle of Wisconsin has vetoed a bill that would have created districts for some members of the Board of Regents for the state. The bill was pushed by legislators who said it was important to promote geographic diversity on the board. But Governor Doyle, in his veto message, disagreed.
December 15, 2009
Students at Boise State University organized a rally after hateful fliers were distributed on campus -- by who is not known -- KTVB News reported. The fliers claimed to be providing information about safe sex, and said that "blacks are walking STD factories" and "once you go black we don't want you back."
December 15, 2009
Authorities are investigating vandalism that damaged about three-fourths of the pianos in practice rooms at Ithaca College this weekend, The Ithaca Journal reported. Some of the pianos were severely damaged, while others had parts removed. The piano vandalism comes as music students are preparing for final exams and performances.
December 15, 2009
Canadian universities -- like their counterparts in the United States -- have been telling students to stay away from campuses if they have flu-like symptoms.

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