Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

September 24, 2009
A majority of financial aid officers reported increases of 10 percent or more in the numbers of students applying for financial aid and receiving Pell Grants at their institutions, according to a survey released Wednesday by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators.
September 24, 2009
Is Emerson College the most crime-ridden college in the United States? The Daily Beast appears to think so, but not everyone agrees. The Daily Beast, Tina Brown's new Web site, ranked all colleges based on per capita crimes in federal reports, as well as other factors, and Emerson led the list.
September 24, 2009
Two years after Oral Roberts University announced that it was $55 million in debt, the institution has announced that it is debt-free, The Tulsa News reported. The debt skyrocketed under the presidency of Richard Roberts, who quit amid accusations (which he denied) that he was misspending university funds.
September 24, 2009
Sacred Heart University has become the latest institution to stop requiring the SAT or ACT for admission. A statement from the university said its new policy "gives students the autonomy to decide what information they believe best represents their qualifications for admission to the university.
September 24, 2009
Terence Kealey, vice-chancellor of the University of Buckingham, is under fire by student groups for his contribution to a collection in The Times Higher on "The Seven Deadly Sins of the Academy." Kealey's contribution was on lust, and he wrote about female students.
September 24, 2009
Kentucky's community-technical college system abused its power in eliminating tenure for new faculty members, state's attorney general says.
September 24, 2009
To get through today's economic travails and what's to come, writes Jeff Abernathy, college administrators -- working closely with their faculties -- must try things they've never done before.
September 23, 2009
The State University of New York at Potsdam on Tuesday joined a growing number of colleges ending requirements that all applicants submit SAT or ACT scores, but the announcement was also part of a broader shift in admissions policy. Potsdam has evaluated applicants on a formula based only on test scores and high school grades.
September 23, 2009
The University of Utah stages an ancient Greek play each year, and typically offers a performance at Brigham Young University as well. This year, there will be no performance at Brigham Young. The university's theater department called off the production of a modern adaptation of Bakkhai by Euripides (commonly spelled as Bacchae).
September 23, 2009
An outside panel is investigating the board of the Maricopa Community Colleges, following anonymous allegations sent to its accreditor about alleged micromanaging, The Arizona Republic reported. The complaint charged that the board makes decisions without adequately consulting the educators charged with daily management of the colleges.

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