Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

April 1, 2009
A House of Representatives committee on Tuesday approved legislation designed to improve coordination of federal science education programs. The measure (HR 1709), which was drafted and passed by the House Science Committee, would establish a panel to oversee and ensure the effective interaction of science, technology, engineering and mathematics education programs sponsored by the various federal research agencies.
April 1, 2009
President of SUNY's Buffalo State College becomes first minority leader of one of Washington's six major higher education associations.
April 1, 2009
WASHINGTON -- The Obama administration's 2010 budget proposal in February to eliminate the lender-based guaranteed student loan program poured gasoline on the longstanding (and, to many, tiresome) debate over whether that program or the federal government's competing direct loan program is more efficient, cost effective, etc.
March 31, 2009
Bill to correct Higher Education Act errors would make several substantive changes, including putting off controversial bidding process for federal parent loans.
March 31, 2009
Fairfield University, in Connecticut, announced Monday that is will no longer require that all undergraduate applicants submit SAT scores. Applicants will now have the option of submitting an essay instead of the the test scores. The university announcement said that its internal research and national studies suggested that high school grades provided the best indicator of a student's abilities.
March 31, 2009
Prosecutors have dropped all charges against Ben Chun Liu, a postdoc at the University of California at San Francisco, who was charged in October with trying to poison a co-worker, Bay City News Service reported. The case attracted considerable attention at the time of Liu's arrest, but authorities now say that there is no evidence that he was trying to poison anyone and that the substance suspected by the co-worker of being poison would only have been dangerous in massive amounts.
March 31, 2009
House and Senate leaders last week introduced the Development, Relief, and Education for Alien Minors (DREAM) Act, which provides a pathway to permanent residency to undocumented immigrants who arrived in the United States as children (aged 15 or under) and who attend college or serve in the military for at least two years.
March 31, 2009
Lots of people get turned down for federal grants. But based on the information he received, Kenneth Taylor wasn't sure his application received a fair hearing at the National Endowment for the Humanities. Taylor is a professor of philosophy at Stanford University and co-host of the radio show "Philosophy Talk," and contributes to a blog with the same name.
March 31, 2009
Following the decision by Boston College to bar a planned speech Monday by William Ayers, students instead devoted the day to talking about academic freedom. College officials said that they called off the Ayers event because of the sensitivity in Boston to a 1970 police killing that, while not viewed by experts as linked to the Weather Underground, is associated with the Weather Underground by some residents and by many conservatives on talk radio.
March 31, 2009
Students from ethnic groups in the Middle East and surrounding regions are pushing the University of California to add a "Middle Eastern" box on admissions forms, saying that they do not feel comfortable with either "white" or "other," the Los Angeles Times reported. At the University of California at Los Angeles, groups representing Arab, Iranian, Afghan and Armenian students are pushing for the change.

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