Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

To reach this person, click here.

Most Recent Articles

October 5, 2009
Stanford University is seeking to sell $1 billion in investment assets, including shares in companies, real estate and timberland, The Wall Street Journal reported. The sales are generally only portions of Stanford's holdings in the investments, and come as the university seeks to recover from substantial endowment losses that have created severe short-term financial difficulties, even though the university has one of the largest endowments in the world.
October 5, 2009
Authorities have arrested three students at the University of California at Los Angeles, and four others, in charges related to a fight at an off-campus fraternity party, the Los Angeles Times reported. Two of the students are charged with attempted murder, and the third is charged as an accessory. While arrests related to fraternity parties are not rare, arrests of students for attempted murder are.
October 5, 2009
Morehouse College has fired a woman and reprimanded another employee over remarks they made in an e-mail mocking a gay wedding, and forwarding the e-mail to others from their Morehouse accounts, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported. Robert M. Franklin, Morehouse's president, has said several times that he believes the college must promote respect for gay people.
October 5, 2009
Stanley O. Ikenberry, former president of the University of Illinois system and of the American Council on Education, was named Saturday as interim president at the University of Illinois, which is recovering from an admissions scandal that led to the resignation of B. Joseph White, who will leave the presidency at the end of the year.
October 5, 2009
Education Management Corporation's initial public offering was priced at the low end of its proposed range Friday, but gained during trading after launch, the Associated Press reported. Education Management is the third education IPO since November, following those of Grand Canyon Education, Inc. and Bridgepoint Education, Inc. Education Management's holdings include the Art Institutes and Argosy University.
October 5, 2009
The Phi Beta Kappa Society has voted to allow four more colleges to create chapters. The society admits new chapters only at its triennial meeting, and this year has accepted applications from Butler University, in Indiana; the College of Saint Benedict-Saint John’s University, in Minnesota; Elon University, in North Carolina; and James Madison University, in Virginia. The honorary society declined to name the colleges that were not successful in their bids to start chapters.
October 5, 2009
The National Archives and Records Administration has released a report on alternatives to the current system for housing presidential papers at libraries throughout the country The report was requested by Congress, amid concerns about the growing cost of the system in which foundations set up by recent presidents donate the records and affiliated museums to the National Archives. One possibility raised in the report (which does not draw a conclusion on the best option) would be to keep the museums under the control of the foundations, not the government.
October 5, 2009
The National Science Foundation announced a new round of grants for a controversial program in which social scientists conduct research relevant to the needs of the Department of Defense.
October 5, 2009
King Abdullah of Saudi Arabia has removed from a key position a cleric who recently criticized a new university for enrolling both male and female students, AFP reported. The cleric had called the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology's policy "evil." No reason was given the for the king's removal of the cleric, Sheikh Sa'ad al-Shethry, from the council that sets religious policy for the country.
October 5, 2009
In conference call with community college presidents, Obama administration officials offer support and praise -- and subtly seek backing for plan on restructuring financial aid programs.

Pages

Back to Top