Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

December 17, 2009
A new report, "Taking Stock: Higher Education and Latinos," summarizes research about the progress of Latino students in higher education and the views of political leaders and students themselves on that progress -- and areas where not enough progress has been made. The report urges a renewed national focus on increasing educational attainment by Latinos.
December 17, 2009
The stem cell lines most commonly used by researchers are lacking in diversity, according to a study by University of Michigan professors that is being published in The New England Journal of Medicine. The Michigan team analyzed 47 embryonic stem cell lines and found that most were derived from donors of northern and western European ancestry.
December 17, 2009
Black students at Georgetown University are protesting the campus humor magazine's attempt to satirize a controversy over race related to the April Fool's edition of The Georgetown Hoya, the main student newspaper, the Associated Press reported. The Hoya's joke issue featured an article -- denounced as offensive by many students -- calling for more sex between black and white students on campus.
December 17, 2009
Young people are surprisingly absent from the health care debate, even though the stakes are high for them, write Laura Stark and her students.
December 16, 2009
Penn fires its men's basketball coach midseason -- an unusual step for any college, let alone an Ivy League sports program.
December 16, 2009
As negotiations and lobbying continue, Pittsburgh's City Council is slated to vote today on a plan to impose a 1 percent tax on tuition, The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reported, and the outcome is unclear. Earlier articles suggested that the necessary five votes were there for passage, but the newspaper quoted one of the council members who had been expected to vote Yes as saying she was undecided, and others may want to delay a vote.
December 16, 2009
An organization that seeks tougher enforcement of immigration laws is suing Texas over a state law that gives in-state tuition rates to some students who lack the documentation to show that they have the legal right to live in the United States, The Houston Chronicle reported. The suit charges that the law violates federal statutes, but defenders argue that there is no such federal ban. The suit says that at least 8,000 students currently benefit from the law.
December 16, 2009
The barrage of dueling entreaties and warnings about the future of the federal student loans continued Tuesday, as four leading Congressional Republicans told college presidents in a letter that "the elimination of the [Federal Family Education Loan Program] is not imminent" because "there remains widespread, bipartisan
December 16, 2009
Eastfield College is being sued for allegedly violating the religious freedom of students in a ceramics class by barring them from making crosses in the class, WFAA News reported. The Texas community college says that the class bans many relatively common objects students might create -- including Christmas items, dog bowls, and mugs with names of states or football teams -- not to limit religious expression, but to encourage student creativity.
December 15, 2009
The acting inspector general of the U.S. Education Department said in a letter Monday that her office would investigate Republican charges that senior department officials inappropriately encouraged college officials to support the proposed elimination of the Federal Family Education Loan Program. In asking the inspector general last month to conduct the review, Rep.

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