Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

September 17, 2009
The Volleyball Rules Committee of the National Collegiate Athletic Association has recommended that players refrain from traditional handshakes before and after matches due to concerns about the spread of H1N1. Volleyball is one of the two sports in which players from opposing teams are required by the NCAA to shake hands; the other is wrestling. Not everyone, however, is convinced that the NCAA recommendation is helpful.
September 17, 2009
Families are saving an average of $2,676 for college annually, according to the results of a new survey by Sallie Mae and Gallup. The survey also found that -- as a percentage of income -- those with incomes under $50,000 save more than wealthier families. Only 29 percent of families are on track to meet their college savings goals, the survey found. Details of "How America Saves for Colleges 2009" are available here.
September 17, 2009
A Hofstra University student has recanted allegations that she was forced into a dormitory men's room stall, tied up and gang raped by five men, Newsday reported. The allegation led to the arrests of four men, one of them another Hofstra student, who were released from jail Wednesday night after their accuser told prosecutors that the sex had been consensual, which is what the men had said when they were first questioned.
September 17, 2009
University foundations in Mississippi are protesting a state plan that would involve some oversight of the fund-raising organizations, The Jackson Clarion-Ledger reported. A legislative audit called for increased oversight, but the foundations say that they would lose too much autonomy, endangering donor privacy, which could in turn endanger donations.
September 17, 2009
ESPN has been getting flack for airing an array of advertisements for “Sorority Row,” a violent slasher movie in which sorority sisters are stalked and killed, during its coverage of college football’s kickoff weekend. The ads struck particularly close to home for a number of Florida State University fans who were watching the Sept. 7 game versus the University of Miami.
September 17, 2009
First college president to lead the national college sports association instituted ambitious academic reforms and pushed presidential control and financial transparency.
September 17, 2009
Larry Anderson, interim president of Fond du Lac Tribal and Community College, in Minnesota, has been promoted to the job on a permanent basis.Howard Barnett, managing director of TSF Capital, in Oklahoma, has been chosen as president of Oklahoma State University at Tulsa.
September 16, 2009
Lacking major push for college access like that envisioned by White House and others, enrollments would grow by only 13 percent through 2018, far short of President Obama's goal, U.S. study finds.
September 16, 2009
Hundreds of faculty members and others at University of California campuses say that they will not be in class next Thursday to protest the way the system is handling budget cuts, The San Francisco Chronicle reported. A turning point for many professors was the university's announcement that they could not take any of their furlough days on days that they have teaching assignments.
September 16, 2009
Fewer students are participating in study abroad programs and many colleges are cutting their budgets for study abroad because of the economic downturn, according to a survey conducted by the Forum on Education Abroad. The association surveyed its nearly 400 members, and 165 of them responded. About two-thirds said the economy had negatively affected their programs, with 59 percent reporting a decrease in the number of students enrolling (about half reporting declines of 10 percent or less) and 60 percent reporting that their institutions had cut their budgets.

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