Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

August 19, 2009
Agnes Scott College has decided to no longer require the SAT or ACT for admissions. College officials cited research prepared last year by the National Association for College Admission Counseling as well as internal work suggesting that test scores weren't essential to make good admissions decisions.
August 19, 2009
An academic study has found that the colleges of the University of Oxford were more likely in 2002 to offer undergraduate spots to male than female applicants, even though the female applicants had better grades, The Guardian reported. Oxford officials said that the data are out of date, but also denied that any discrimination took place in 2002.
August 18, 2009
Paper attributes comparative drop in American university productivity internationally to decline in financial support for public universities.
August 18, 2009
Authorities arrested four people Monday at a protest at the University of California at Berkeley over the continued tenure there of John Yoo, a law professor who during work in the Bush administration wrote several memos used to justify the use of torture on suspected terrorists, the Associated Press reported.
August 18, 2009
Many University of California professors are urging a federal judge to alter the proposed settlement of the suit against Google over its plans to build a mammoth digital library, The New York Times reported.
August 18, 2009
Ever since Hurricane Katrina hit New Orleans in 2005, Southern University has complained that its campus there has not received the federal help to which it was entitled. On Monday, that dispute was settled with the announcement from Janet Napolitano, secretary of homeland security, that Southern's New Orleans campus will receive $32 million to allow it to rebuild four academic buildings, The New Orleans Times-Picayune reported.
August 18, 2009
With the new academic year starting and colleges expecting many outbreaks of H1N1 virus, one of the first outbreaks is at Oklahoma State University. Three cases have been confirmed and many more are expected, NewsOK.com reported. All of the cases have been mild.
August 18, 2009
Nicholls State University’s redesigned mascot has angered some alumni who find it has a striking resemblance “to a soldier from Adolf Hitler's Third Reich or a member of Soviet Russia's Red Army.” The Times-Picayune reports that the university spent $30,000 to rebrand the logo of Col. Tillou – the mascot named after Francis Redding Tillou Nicholls, university namesake, former Louisiana governor and Confederate officer.
August 18, 2009
At a meeting of the American Association of University Professors this summer, a trio from the University of Akron -- the Ad Hoc, Post-Tenure Under-Appreciated Band -- performed works on the priorities of universities, management in higher ed and other topics. Among the lyrcis:

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