Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

August 5, 2009
Two groups that represent academic libraries -- the Association of Research Libraries and the Association of College and University Libraries -- have joined an appeal to an injunction banning the publication of 60 Years Later, a planned sequel to Catcher in the Rye. J.D. Salinger sees the sequel -- written under the pen name Mr. C., and telling the story of what happened later in life to Holden Caulfield -- as infringing on his copyright, and a federal judge agreed.
August 5, 2009
After the University of Central Florida decided to eliminate its engineering technology program, it set off a competition among community colleges (many of which in Florida are expanding offerings, including bachelor's degrees). As The News-Journal reported, Daytona State College has signed contracts with 10 of the professors who taught at Central Florida, planning to revive the program.
August 5, 2009
The Senate on Tuesday approved a 2010 spending bill that would increase spending on agriculture research by about 5 percent over the current year level and direct about $60 million to specific universities in earmarks designated by individual senators.
August 5, 2009
The University of Louisville shut many programs Tuesday, and will have some programs closed today, due to record rainfall that left many buildings with up to two feet of water. No injuries were reported by several dozen employees who had to be rescued from one building. Damage estimates, while not final, are expected to be significant.
August 5, 2009
Review of colleges' emergency plans suggests relatively few have key elements in place to respond to campus shootings.
August 4, 2009
Another higher ed accountability system starts today, breaking new ground in examining program-level learning outcomes. Like others, it is constrained by concerns about disclosure and competition.
August 4, 2009
The chairman of the University of Illinois Board of Trustees resigned Monday, the Chicago Tribune reported. Niranjan Shah was the latest person to be done in by the admissions controversy that has embroiled the university; Shah was among the university officials who had been accused of pushing to admit applicants based more on their political connections than their academic credentials.
August 4, 2009
The Education Department's inspector general said Monday that Sallie Mae had overbilled the U.S. Treasury by $22.3 million in payments made to its Nellie Mae subsidiary from 2003 to 2006. The company inappropriately sought reimbursement from the government for loans financed with tax-exempt bonds, even though the bonds had matured, the inspector general found; Sallie Mae disputed the finding.
August 4, 2009
A federal judge ordered the University of Louisville Monday to reinstate a nursing student who was expelled in February after she wrote on a blog about her dealings with patients, the Courier-Journal reported. The judge said that Nina Yoder's postings were "crass" but did not violate the institution's confidentiality rules or honor code, according to the newspaper.
August 4, 2009
The University of Florida may, like many major universities, be grappling with serious cuts to its academic and other budgets.

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