Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

March 26, 2009
Blackboard, the leading course management company, is today announcing an application for the iPhone -- a device that has quickly become popular with many students. The new system will allow iPhone users to interact with their Blackboard pages anyplace they carry their phones. In a statement, Michael L. Chasen, president and CEO of Blackboard, said the application would "help students more deeply engage in the educational experience by creating learning opportunities that are not bound by time or place.”
March 26, 2009
Rigorous eligibility requirements and a faster-than-ideal timeline for implementing the Academic Competitiveness and SMART Grant Programs limited college students' use of the two new financial aid programs, the Government Accountability Office said in an analysis Wednesday.
March 26, 2009
Tufts University withdrew an invitation to an aide to Sen. Charles Grassley to speak at a campus forum, saying that university administrators couldn't appear at the forum along with the aide, The Boston Globe reported. The reason cited was that Senator Grassley (and the aide) are investigating possible conflicts of interest in federally supported research, including that of at least one professor at Tufts.
March 26, 2009
For the first time in its history, San Jose State University is rejecting qualified applicants. The San Jose Mercury News reported that while all eligible students from Santa Clara County were admitted, 4,400 from elsewhere in the state were told that they would have to enroll at other California State University campuses. University officials have been warning that they would be unable to meet the increased demand for slots, given the state's budget cuts.
March 26, 2009
Colorado College has announced plans to cut three teams from its athletics program: football, softball and water polo. In an open letter announcing the changes, college officials cited the need to cut spending. While many colleges are pushing to control athletic (and other) spending, Colorado has a particularly difficult time, the letter noted, because it is the only Division III program in the Mountain Time Zone, forcing particularly high spending on travel.
March 26, 2009
Even amid the cuts and tight budgets of this economically devastating year for higher education, the University of California is hiring senior officials at top salaries and awarding large raises to others, The San Francisco Chronicle reported. According to the newspaper, the university has in the last two months awarded raises of as much as 22.3 percent to a half dozen senior officials.
March 26, 2009
Democratic leaders in the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives took starkly different approaches Wednesday to the budget resolutions they are required to draft to lay out their chambers' plans to craft federal budgets for the 2010 fiscal year. But the plans shared one common element that could bode well for college students.
March 26, 2009
John Hope Franklin -- a leading historian during the last century and a pioneer in African-American studies -- died Wednesday at the age of 94. Franklin was the James B. Duke Professor Emeritus of History at Duke University, and earlier in his career he taught at historically black colleges such as Fisk and Howard Universities. He also taught at institutions such as Brooklyn College and the University of Chicago, in an era when black professors were rare outside of black colleges.
March 26, 2009
A U.S. appeals court -- the fourth to do so -- rules that future doctors are not automatically ineligible for student exemption from payroll taxes.
March 25, 2009
Federal appeals court's ruling highlights use (mainly by career-related institutions) of clauses requiring students to pursue complaints through arbitration instead of the legal system.

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