Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

To reach this person, click here.

Most Recent Articles

March 25, 2009
Federal appeals court's ruling highlights use (mainly by career-related institutions) of clauses requiring students to pursue complaints through arbitration instead of the legal system.
March 25, 2009
Ohio's Controlling Board, which oversees various spending projects authorized by the state, on Monday rejected plans by Miami University to purchase $167,000 worth of office chairs. The problem, The Columbus Dispatch reported, is that many of the chairs were priced at $522 each, when there are less expensive options available.
March 25, 2009
The Patriot League – a eight-member Division I National Collegiate Athletic Association conference – has adopted a cost-efficiency plan to help save money during the current economic downturn. Among other changes, the conference will set limits on the number of individuals that can travel with a team, eliminate awards banquets at its championships, and begin using teleconferencing for meetings of its head coaches.
March 25, 2009
Yale University has filed a suit in federal court seeking affirmation that the university is the legitimate owner of "The Night Cafe," a Van Gogh masterpiece, the Associated Press reported.
March 24, 2009
The University of Winnipeg, carrying out the results of a student vote, will ban bottled water from the campus. Winnipeg is the first Canadian university to take the step. Washington University in St. Louis kicked off the movement in the United States, and campus activists are trying to spread the idea, which focuses on energy and materials wasted in the production and distribution of bottled water.
March 24, 2009
Hockey is to Minnesota as football is to Alabama and basketball to North Carolina -- and not easily trifled with. But these are troubled economic times, bad enough to force the University of Minnesota-Crookston to discontinue its Division II men's hockey program, the university announced Monday. Campus officials said the state's financial situation and the challenges of fielding a Division II program in a region where few others exist had made continuing the team impossible.
March 24, 2009
The Institute of International Education on Monday released a paper on promoting study abroad in science and technology fields, the latest of a series of papers on study abroad capacity and participation.
March 24, 2009
Leon R. Kass, a bioethicist, was named Monday by the National Endowment for the Humanities to give the 2009 Jefferson Lecture. The lectureship is one of the top honors the federal government sponsors for humanities scholars. Kass, a professor at the University of Chicago, was involved in several controversies during the Bush administration, when he served as chair of the President's Council on Bioethics and was viewed by some as too quick to regulate science.
March 24, 2009
Texas lawmakers are questioning the authority under which Gov. Rick Perry, a Republican, moved funds from one state fund to another so that the latter fund could award a $50 million grant to Texas A&M University for a new research facility on drug treatments and vaccines, The Dallas Morning News reported.
March 24, 2009
Christine Kopinski, the only journalism professor at Clark College, is credited with advising student journalists there on how to improve their newspaper, which in recent years has focused on such issues as campus security, flaws in student advising, and budget choices facing the college. Now Kopinski has been denied tenure: the college's trustees voted down her bid, despite support from her department, The Columbian reported.

Pages

Back to Top