Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

October 20, 2009
France's minister of higher education on Monday suspended the president of the University of Toulon and two top aides in a growing scandal over irregularities in the admission and graduation of Chinese students at the institution, The Washington Post reported.
October 20, 2009
The American Association of University Professors announced Monday that it is starting an investigation into allegations concerning the layoffs of tenured professors at the San Francisco Art Institute. While the art institute has said that the dismissals were due to financial exigency, some professors have questioned that, and whether the art institution followed proper procedures.
October 20, 2009
Vox Populi, a Georgetown University blog, has identified a sophomore whose ad for a personal assistant "takes premature self-importance to a whole new level." The ad describes duties this way: "PA example tasks -Organize closet -make bed -Drop off / pick up dry cleaning -Drop me off / pick me up from work -Do laundry -Fill up gas tank -bring car for servicing -schedule appointment for haircut -Pay parking tickets -manage e
October 20, 2009
A leading test preparation company, seeking to diversify its revenue streams, decides that instead of just preparing students to attend other colleges, it wants to run its own. So it buys a company that provides career training to adults and has a virtual high school.
October 19, 2009
Critics say exemption in bill to create Consumer Financial Protection Agency would let for-profit colleges ply students with their own high-interest loans.
October 19, 2009
As head of the Teagle Foundation for six years, Robert Connor didn't have anywhere near the money of the Lumina Foundation for Education or the visibility of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. But that didn't stop him and the foundation from working tirelessly, through grants to colleges and many "convenings" of higher education officials, to encourage the "systematic assessment" of what students learn.
October 19, 2009
More colleges are making portions smaller and adding nutritious ingredients (sometimes without telling) in efforts to encourage healthier eating habits in students, The Boston Globe reported.
October 19, 2009
Following an intense lobbying drive by colleges and students in Illinois, a new law will authorize about 137,000 low-income students to receive their state grants for the spring semester. The grants were endangered because the state -- facing a budget crisis -- cut $200 million from the program. But the Chicago Tribune reported that Gov. Pat Quinn signed legislation allowing the state to borrow money for the grants from other state funds.
October 19, 2009
Harding University announced Friday that it will consider the new state lottery in Arkansas to be off limits to students, the Associated Press reported. The new lottery supports college scholarships, and Harding officials earlier said that the university's ban on gambling did not apply to the lottery.
October 19, 2009
Gallaudet University named T. Alan Hurwitz as its next president on Sunday. Hurwitz has spent most of his professional career at the National Technical Institute for the Deaf, where he started teaching engineering in 1970 and rose through the ranks to become president. NTID is part of the Rochester Institute of Technology, and Hurwitz also serves as an RIT vice president. Not only does Hurwitz have extensive experience in deaf education, but he is deaf -- which is seen as important by many students, professors and alumni.

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