Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

March 16, 2009
A year after Texas higher education officials declined to approve a proposed master's degree to be offered by the Institute for Creation Research, a state legislator has suggested a workaround: altering Texas law in a way that would exempt the institute from state regulation. The News-Journal of Longview reported Monday that State Rep.
March 15, 2009
The Arizona Board of Regents has voted to maintain a popular scholarship program for students who achieve certain testing scores, despite a request from university presidents to eliminate it, The Tucson Citizen reported. The presidents of Arizona State University and the University of Arizona had argued that the funds ($27.5 million) would be better spent elsewhere and that the students who earn the scholarships have access to other sources of financial support.
March 15, 2009
Carrying signs with slogans like "Why was my friend shot?," students at Grand Valley State University held a protest Friday over the police shooting of an unarmed student in his off-campus apartment, The Grand Rapids Press reported. While police officers indicated that the student was shot in a drug raid, the student's family members and friends said he wasn't a drug dealer.
March 14, 2009
The Alaska Supreme Court on Friday ordered the University of Alaska System to return to direct state ownership 250,000 acres of land provided by state laws in 2000 and 2005. The land transfers were designed to boost the university's endowment, but were challenged by environmental groups.
March 14, 2009
John Baldwin, president of the Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, has repaid Texas Tech $15,404 for flying his wife, who lives in New York City, to Texas for university events, The Lubbock Avalanche-Journal reported. Baldwin also repaid $2,000 for Town Car service for his wife to and from New York City airports, and $1,804 for his membership in the Harvard Club in New York City -- also expenses he had billed to the university.
March 14, 2009
Rhode Island authorities have charged John Dawson, who was fired as associate dean of continuing studies at Roger Williams University, with stalking faculty members, in connection with letters and postcards he sent them, The Providence Journal reported.
March 13, 2009
The chancellor of the University of Arkansas at Fayetteville has asked the university's trustees to keep tuition flat for the 2009-10 academic year, citing the financial situation of students and families. Chancellor Dave Gearhart said the proposal, which would represent the first year of no tuition increase in 24 years, is contingent on state legislators supporting the governor's proposal to partially restore a $5 million budget cut imposed this year.
March 13, 2009
The University of Missouri has agreed to pay $2 million to settle a lawsuit filed by the family of a football player who died during a 2005 preseason workout, the Associated Press reports. The settlement, in which the university and a group of officials admitted no wrongdoing, ends a legal battle over the death of Aaron O'Neal, 19, who collapsed during a voluntary workout in July 2005.
March 13, 2009
In first Congressional appearance, Duncan faces relatively little criticism of president's ambitious college proposals -- even on plan to end lender-based loan program.
March 12, 2009
The Education Department's plan to carry out state-by-state auctions among lenders for the right to originate federal student loans for parents got a little dicier Thursday, as the country's biggest lender announced that it would not participate in the auctions.

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