Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

March 23, 2009
Two institutions in Moorhead, Minnesota -- Concordia College and Minnesota State University at Moorhead -- are calling off most classes today so students and others may help prepare sandbags to deal with serious local flooding.
March 23, 2009
One of the longest serving presidents in higher education, Benjamin F. Payton of Tuskegee University, has announced plans to retire. During Payton's tenure, Tuskegee broadened its educational offerings (and changed its name from Tuskegee Institute to Tuskegee University to reflect that shift). Tuskegee has a prominent role in the history of black higher education and a tradition of long-serving presidents, starting with Booker T. Washington.
March 23, 2009
The board of the College of DuPage last week adopted a series of policies that effectively give the board more explicit authority over daily management of the college -- including many matters that professors say should primarily be handled by the faculty and the administration. The dispute has been going on for months and focused on a revision of the college's policy handbook.
March 23, 2009
Under the new GI Bill, which covers veterans' tuition up to the most expensive resident rate at a public college in the state, private colleges have the option of entering into a matching program with the federal government to cover the balance. How many colleges will participate in the Yellow Ribbon program, and to what extent, has been an open question as many institutions await final regulations.
March 23, 2009
Eleven students at Michigan State University have returned from a spring break trip to Guatemala during which their bus was seized and they were forced off and tied up, then robbed at gunpoint, The Detroit Free Press reported. The students were on a program in which they were performing volunteer work in Guatemala.
March 23, 2009
For weeks now, the Senate (at the bidding of a few senators) has been delaying the confirmations of John Holdren to lead the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy and Jane Lubchenco to lead the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The delays have infuriated scientists because Holdren and Lubchenco are highly respected researchers whose nominations have been widely applauded.
March 20, 2009
Surfline has released its list of the top 10 colleges and universities for surfing. Not surprisingly, California leads the nation, with 6 of the top 10 positions, including top-ranked University of California at San Diego and the runner-up, the UC campus at Santa Cruz. The rankings not only feature information about surfing quality, but lists of professors and alumni who surf, and a special "demerits" category that may run counter to academic thinking.
March 20, 2009
James Franco's film credits in Milk, Pineapple Express and other works earned him "Man of the Year" honors this year from Harvard University's Hasty Pudding Theatricals. But students at Franco's alma mater, the University of California at Los Angeles, are protesting his selection as this year's commencement speaker. Franco graduated last year, but not all the seniors like what they remember of him.
March 20, 2009
The Institute of International Education on Thursday released a paper on "Expanding Study Abroad in the Arab World: Challenges and Opportunities." The paper notes great enthusiasm for the endeavor, among Arab and U.S. educators alike, but also a number of challenges. Among the challenges are: issues of credit and academic standards -- many U.S. colleges, the paper notes, will only grant credit for a few study abroad programs in the region, "those that they directly manage or are closely affiliated with other U.S.
March 20, 2009
Negotiations to revive Antioch College and to make it an independent institution are making good progress, according to a statement released Thursday by the Great Lakes Colleges Association. The association has been helping the discussions between advocates for the college and Antioch University, whose board suspended the college's operations. The statement said that, of 45 items that need to be decided, agreement has been reached on 35 and "general consensus" has been reached on the rest.

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