Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

January 22, 2010
WASHINGTON -- Jim comes to college with big academic ambitions, struggles with his grades as he balances course work with basketball and a social life, but emerges having found a career path that flows from his interest in sports. Yasmin, a high school overachiever like many of her peers of South Asian descent, gets A's and B's but feels like her grades aren't good, values social relationships over her mostly "boring" courses, and seems to relish her academic work only at the point (in her junior year) when she sees it as linked to her to her personal and family life.
January 21, 2010
Georgia Southern men's basketball is latest sports program to suffer NCAA penalties because athletics employee did course work for players.
January 21, 2010
Foreign language instruction in elementary and secondary schools is "no better -- and in some areas worse" -- than it was in 1997, according to the "National K-12 Foreign Language Survey." The study found "pockets of innovation" in teaching methods and increases (from a very low base) in the teaching of Arabic and Chinese. But many other findings -- with implications for foreign language programs at colleges and universities -- suggested backward movement.
January 21, 2010
The Department of Veterans Affairs pledged Wednesday that it is prepared to process benefits requests in a timely way as the spring semester gets started. Since the Post-9/11 GI Bill started last year, the VA has paid more than $1.3 billion in benefits to more than 170,000 students.
January 21, 2010
Northwestern College, in Minnesota, is facing an "identity crisis," The Star Tribune reported. Some students and alumni accuse the college of trying to weed out traditional professors and trustees and to shift toward a "postmodern" theology, the newspaper said. Administrators and trustees say that no philosophical shift has taken place and that the controversy is all the work of a small group of disgruntled alumni.
January 21, 2010
A New Hampshire judge has dismissed a lawsuit challenging the decision of Dartmouth College to expand the size of its board, effectively reducing the proportion of trustees that are elected by alumni. The ruling was based in part on the dismissal of a similar, earlier challenge to the college's board expansion.
January 21, 2010
Israel's government is backing the stance of the Ariel University Center of Samaria, located on the West Bank, that it is indeed an Israeli university and not a college, Haaretz reported. The institution was founded as a college and has been pushing for university status, with backing from those who advocate a strong Israeli presence on the West Bank. Advocates for Palestinians have criticized the growth of the institution as needlessly disruptive to peace talks.
January 20, 2010
Many who are affiliated with the Baylor College of Medicine -- which has for years been independent of Baylor University -- are worried about discussions going on to merge back into the university, The Houston Chronicle reported.
January 20, 2010
The University of California Board of Regents is expected this week to approve incentive pay of $3.1 million for executives at the university's medical centers, and once again the university is being criticized for the extra funds it offers senior administrators, The San Francisco Chronicle reported. University officials say that the incentive pay rewards officials who met certain goals and that these goals improve patient care.
January 20, 2010
Residents of college towns complain all the time about students whose parties keep them up or leave messes in the neighborhood. Some Berkeley residents have gone a step further, and they are suing more than 70 fraternities and property owners in the area near the University of California at Berkeley, saying that the actions of those living in the houses make it impossible for others to live in the area, The Contra Costa Times reported.

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