Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

To reach this person, click here.

Most Recent Articles

March 19, 2009
The governor of Nevada has asked the U.S. Education Department to exempt the state from a requirement that it restore several hundred million dollars in spending on higher education to claim its share of federal stimulus funds, the Las Vegas Sun reported.
March 18, 2009
British universities are divided over whether to embrace the use of a new top grade -- A* -- on students' "A level" exams exiting high school, the Telegraph reports. The University of Cambridge said this week that it would begin considering the new grade because its admissions officials found themselves rejecting too many students who had earned straight A's on their comprehensive exams.
March 18, 2009
A coalition of scholarly and civil liberties groups plan to urge President Obama today to abandon the Bush administration's approach of blocking the visas of foreign scholars and writers who hold controversial views, The New York Times reported.
March 18, 2009
Sometimes, in spite of trying to be helpful, spouses can hurt a job candidate's chances, writes Jean Dowdall.
March 18, 2009
For the second time in four years, Florida State University is challenging a major punishment of it by the National Collegiate Athletic Association, declaring itself to be a victim of unfair treatment by the sports group to which it belongs.
March 17, 2009
The number of undergraduate students majoring in computer science this year significantly increased for the first time since the dot-com boom, according to the new edition of an annual report by the Computing Research Association. Last year's report showed the apparent start of a recovery, but this year's data suggest a much stronger position for the discipline.
March 17, 2009
At Brown University, the 10-member Commission on Memorials has recommended that the university commission a memorial recognizing a painful past -- the university's ties to slave trading. In 2006, Brown released a report on this subject, and the commission now aims to involve the broader public in a discussion of the institution's early history and its meaning.
March 17, 2009
Community colleges are a low-cost and effective path to degrees and jobs for many people, especially full-time workers and first-generation Americans -- but bachelor's degree recipients who start out at the two-year institutions earn less than their counterparts who start at four-year institutions, a researcher at the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis reports in an analysis released Tuesday.
March 17, 2009
The University of the South, known as Sewanee, on Monday announced that it will no longer require applicants to submit SAT or ACT scores. Those who wish not to submit test scores will be required to instead provide a graded academic paper and to complete an interview. A statement from the university noted "ample evidence" that colleges don't need SAT or ACT scores to make sound decisions.

Pages

Back to Top