Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

March 17, 2009
It is one of the most visible images in Portland, Oregon: a neon sign over the Willamette River that shouts "Made in Oregon." But the sign, which some local residents compare to Seattle's Space Needle as a recognized landmark, may soon be changed to read "University of Oregon" if that institution has its way, and that has many in the city upset, the Associated Press reports.
March 16, 2009
A proposed overhaul of regulations at the College of DuPage has been softened since its release generated intense controversy at the Illinois community college last fall -- but the revised policy will still undermine academic freedom, teaching, and scholarship; put DuPage "outside the mainstream of education in Illinois and the U.S."; and "diminish the quality of education available to the students," the Illinois Council of the American Association of University Professors says in
March 16, 2009
A French scholar who studied the philosophical implications of quantum physics was awarded the 2009 Templeton Prize on Monday.
March 16, 2009
The American Council on Education on Monday published guidance designed to help military veterans understand the system by which colleges award academic credit for training earned while in the armed forces. The publication lays out the different approaches taken by different institutions and the ways in which the ACE Credit Recommendations process tries to bridge those differences.
March 16, 2009
A year after Texas higher education officials declined to approve a proposed master's degree to be offered by the Institute for Creation Research, a state legislator has suggested a workaround: altering Texas law in a way that would exempt the institute from state regulation. The News-Journal of Longview reported Monday that State Rep.
March 15, 2009
The Arizona Board of Regents has voted to maintain a popular scholarship program for students who achieve certain testing scores, despite a request from university presidents to eliminate it, The Tucson Citizen reported. The presidents of Arizona State University and the University of Arizona had argued that the funds ($27.5 million) would be better spent elsewhere and that the students who earn the scholarships have access to other sources of financial support.
March 15, 2009
Carrying signs with slogans like "Why was my friend shot?," students at Grand Valley State University held a protest Friday over the police shooting of an unarmed student in his off-campus apartment, The Grand Rapids Press reported. While police officers indicated that the student was shot in a drug raid, the student's family members and friends said he wasn't a drug dealer.
March 14, 2009
The Alaska Supreme Court on Friday ordered the University of Alaska System to return to direct state ownership 250,000 acres of land provided by state laws in 2000 and 2005. The land transfers were designed to boost the university's endowment, but were challenged by environmental groups.
March 14, 2009
John Baldwin, president of the Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, has repaid Texas Tech $15,404 for flying his wife, who lives in New York City, to Texas for university events, The Lubbock Avalanche-Journal reported. Baldwin also repaid $2,000 for Town Car service for his wife to and from New York City airports, and $1,804 for his membership in the Harvard Club in New York City -- also expenses he had billed to the university.
March 14, 2009
Rhode Island authorities have charged John Dawson, who was fired as associate dean of continuing studies at Roger Williams University, with stalking faculty members, in connection with letters and postcards he sent them, The Providence Journal reported.

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