Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

November 3, 2008
The reality that only about 7 in 10 students earn degrees after four years in high school has been widely deplored, and it helped drive the Bush administration and Congress to embrace the No Child Left Behind law earlier this decade. But if that situation is seen as such a crisis, why aren't more people upset about the fact that graduation rates in higher education are quite a bit worse?
October 31, 2008
Most of the major changes in the status of women's intercollegiate sports came a decade or two ago when, through a combination of tough federal enforcement, court challenges, and enlightened decisions by college leaders, many institutions began to lavish more money and attention in an attempt to give equitable treatment to their women's teams and female athletes.
October 30, 2008
The University of the District of Columbia has entered a pantheon, but not of the sort that any institution strives for.
October 28, 2008
Professors debate whether mentors of graduate students and young instructors must go beyond supervising to "caring" to be effective, and where the lines are.
October 27, 2008
As student loan providers look back now on the nearly daily accusations of improper marketing to colleges and students that they endured in 2007, many of them grumble that for all the charges of questionable behavior, critics like New York Attorney General Andrew M. Cuomo failed to prove that any students were directly hurt by what they did.
October 27, 2008
TAMPA -- One by one they took to the stage to receive their plaques, each story seemingly more compelling than the last. The single mother with four kids. The young man who had lived in a friend's car for a spell. The cancer survivor whose parents had died when he was four years old.
October 24, 2008
Higher education has gotten short shrift from the candidates during the 2008 presidential campaign. But the Electoral College will continue to capture the attention of Barack Obama, John McCain, voters and the press for at least the next several weeks, and that's very good news for John and Marcia Diamond.
October 22, 2008
46% of private colleges report that some students have "stopped out" of school or shifted to part-time study because they could not get private loans to pay tuition.
October 21, 2008
Your mother always told you that doing drugs and watching too much TV would hurt your grades. A new study proves it.

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