Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

To reach this person, click here.

Most Recent Articles

December 7, 2009
The Arizona Board of Regents voted Friday to raise the ceiling on the number of credits that students can transfer from a community college to a four-year degree program, The Arizona Daily Star reported. The shift -- from 64 to 75 credits -- will allow some students to earn four-year degrees for which they have spent five semesters at a community college and only three at a four-year institution.
December 7, 2009
Two articles in The Dallas Morning News examine issues related to the increased emphasis on Advanced Placement courses at many high schools, at a time that the College Board has encouraged many more schools to participate in the program. One article notes that as the program has grown in Texas, students in the state now fail more than half of the final exams in the program.
December 7, 2009
Colorado State University's board on Friday voted to adopt policies that will lead to a ban on the carrying of concealed weapons on campus, The Denver Post reported. Most colleges ban the carrying of concealed weapons, and faculty leaders backed the decision. But the student government had urged the board not to impose a ban, saying that concealed weapons promoted safety for everyone.
December 7, 2009
The University of Colorado's ban on weapons extends to simulated weapons. As a result, The Daily Camera reported, students at the Boulder campus who want to play Humans vs. Zombies, a popular student game that typically involves Nerf guns, must do so with balled up socks instead of the Nerf guns. "The university doesn't want to come across as a giant institutional killjoy," a spokesman said.
December 7, 2009
ORLANDO -- The public college lobbyists and other officials who attended the Higher Education Government Relations Conference here last week heard a steady barrage of downbeat news: Climbing national unemployment figures, tumbling state revenues, and the scary prospect of the funding “cliff” when the economic stimulus money the federal government sent to states to protect education programs runs out.
December 4, 2009
24 public college systems develop new way of counting enrollments and completion rates -- which show they have long way to go to close achievement gaps for minority and needy students.
December 4, 2009
Hofstra University announced Thursday that it is eliminating its football program. The rationale for the decision was quite similar to that offered by Northeastern University last month in making a similar decision: the need to reallocate funds, which the university pegged at $4.5 million a year.
December 4, 2009
In remarks kicking off a White House forum on job creation and the economy, President Obama repeatedly stressed the role of higher education. "I want to hear about what unions and universities can do to better support and prepare our workers -- not just for the jobs of today, but for the jobs five years from now and 10 years from now and 50 years from now," he said. "We still have the best universities in the world.
December 4, 2009
The chairmen of Congress's education committees on Thursday disputed a report that a proposed lender alternative to President Obama's student loan restructuring proposal would save nearly as much money as the administration's plan. Rep. George Miller and Sen. Tom Harkin were responding to news reports indicating that the Congressional Budget Office had "scored" an alternative put forward by Sen.
December 4, 2009
A New York State appeals court on Thursday rejected the use of eminent domain on behalf of Columbia University for its plan to build a new, 17-acre campus, The New York Times reported. Columbia has purchased most of the land it needs, but was relying on the state's use of eminent domain to obtain properties from owners who refused to sell. An appeal is expected.

Pages

Back to Top