Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

August 3, 2009
A federal jury on Friday ordered Joel Tenenbaum, a Boston University graduate student, to pay $675,000 to four music labels for downloading and sharing music online, The Boston Globe reported. Tenenbaum never denied sharing the music online and the judge ruled that his admission of doing so required a verdict in favor of the music companies, leaving the main question to be the size of damages (which could have been much greater).
August 3, 2009
Last month, Marshall Drummond somewhat mysteriously left the chancellorship of the Los Angeles Community College District, announcing that he and the board had mutually agreed on the move. Drummond was in his second tenure in the job, having left in 2004 to lead the statewide community college system, but returning in 2007 to what he called the job he was really drawn to.
August 3, 2009
The New Jersey Institute of Technology and its alumni association will be in court this month in a dispute over the use of the institution's name, the Associated Press reported. The two entities have been fighting since 2001, when the university tore down an alumni center to build a new student center. In 2008, NJIT told the association that it was being replaced with a new group, and that led the alumni to sue.
August 3, 2009
Old Dominion University officials are denying any conflict of interest in hiring a state legislator -- whose amendment created the Center for Teacher Quality and Educational Leadership at the university -- to run it, The Virginian-Pilot reported. The newspaper, which reported on the situation, prompting criticism of the hire, said that university leaders said the lawmaker was hired on the basis of his qualifications, not his connections.
August 3, 2009
European academic leaders are considering adopting a formal statement on academic freedom, with the idea that professors would benefit from an accepted statement of rights in the way American academics cite the statement of the American Association of University Professors, The Times Higher reported. Among the proposals: Faculty members should have the power to select vice chancellors (those who lead universities).
August 3, 2009
As officials in California have grappled for more than two years with a structure and law for regulating for-profit colleges in the state, there has been much speculation about hypothetical ways in which the expiration of the law governing for-profit regulation could limit the ability of students to seek redress from career college
July 31, 2009
As Senate panel completes work on its spending bill for health, education and labor programs, boundaries are generally set for outlook for higher education.
July 31, 2009
Joe Blake, president and chief executive officer of the Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce, has been selected as chancellor of the Colorado State University System.Anthony A. Frank, interim president of Colorado State University's main campus, has been appointed to the job on a permanent basis.Berton L.
July 31, 2009
The head of a committee examining the University of Illinois admissions controversy is expected to call today for all of the university's current trustees to step aside, The Chicago Tribune reported. Abner Mikva, a former federal judge, said he would urge the panel to recommend a mass resignation when the committee meets to draft its report.
July 31, 2009
About 130,000 college students in Illinois won't receive state financial aid grants this year because the state moved up its deadline for applications because of the economy, the Chicago Sun-Times reported. Some students lose out on aid every year, in Illinois and elsewhere, because they miss the deadline for applying, but this year's total is the most in history because the cutoff is months earlier than normal; it was moved up because the state aid budget is about half its normal size.

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