Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

June 29, 2009
The University of Kansas is becoming the first public university -- following moves by all or parts of institutions such as Harvard and Stanford Universities and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology -- to make all faculty journal articles available free in digital form. Chancellor Robert Hemenway proposed the policy, which was endorsed by the Faculty Senate. The articles will be placed in KU ScholarWorks, a digital repository.
June 29, 2009
The Oregon Senate and House have now passed (with gubernatorial approval expected) legislation to codify principles of the Faculty and College Excellence Campaign of the American Federation of Teachers, which aims to improve the working conditions of faculty members and to push colleges to hire more tenure-track professors.
June 29, 2009
Colleges will soon be urged by the National Collegiate Athletic Association to test athletes for the sickle cell trait -- and eventually the colleges may be required to do so. That's because of the settlement of a lawsuit against Rice University and the NCAA by the family of a football player who died during a workout and whose sickle cell trait was linked to the death, the Associated Press reported. At the time of his death, Rice (like many universities) did not test for the trait.
June 29, 2009
Dickinson College is introducing a new fellowship program to encourage public service and allow students to take a "gap year" (or years) between high school and college. Under the program, students apply as high school seniors and, if admitted, can defer enrollment for one to four academic years. For every year that they spend in public service, they earn a $10,000 credit toward expenses at the college. The students must work for 30-40 hours a week for 10-12 months to be eligible, although they may count work with other programs to encourage service, such as AmeriCorps.
June 29, 2009
Pennsylvania State University and other "state-related" institutions in Pennsylvania -- Lincoln and Temple Universities and the University of Pittsburgh -- have long debated whether they are public institutions or not. They depend on state appropriations and favor in-state applicants, but they have more independence than the state-owned institutions, and periodically assert that they should not be treated as public institutions (such as when groups are seeking information from them under state open records laws). Now Gov.
June 29, 2009
Two University of Arizona graduate students and another researcher were arrested in Brazil, and then freed on bail, on charges of illegally prospecting for minerals, the Associated Press reported. A university spokesman said that the students were in geoscience and were conducting research on climate and environmental change.
June 29, 2009
With the World Conference on Higher Education -- sponsored by the United National Scientific and Cultural Organization -- scheduled to open in Paris at the end of the week, regional pre-conferences are issuing recommendations for the body.
June 29, 2009
Brigham Young University on Friday ended its blocking of YouTube on the university network, The Salt Lake Tribune reported. Students still must be careful about what they view on YouTube because the honor code requires that they avoid Internet material that is not "virtuous, lovely, or of good report or praiseworthy," and plenty of the videos on YouTube would not meet that standard. But university officials said that the wealth of educational material on the site convinced them to stop blocking it.
June 29, 2009
TORONTO -- The annual meeting of the National Association of College and University Attorneys offered its usual eclectic mix of topical sessions, reflecting the increasingly broad portfolios for which the group's members are responsible on their campuses: academic misconduct, real estate, technology transfer, sports marketing contracts, and transgender issues, to name just a few.
June 26, 2009
Newly released e-mail messages may mark a new low in the admissions scandal that just keeps growing at the University of Illinois. The Chicago Tribune reported that the e-mails show that the chancellor of the university's Urbana-Champaign campus, Richard Herman, pressured the law school to let in an applicant favored by the then-governor, Rod Blagojevich, in return for having the governor get jobs for five law graduates with less than stellar academic records.

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