Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

May 18, 2009
The University of California at Los Angeles and Mostafa Tabatabainejad, a former student who was repeatedly stunned with a Taser by UCLA police while a student in 2006, have settled a suit against the university, the two parties announced. The incident took place when Tabatabainejad failed to produce an ID card.
May 18, 2009
Brandeis continues to maintain that its art museum's future has yet to be determined. But when it closed Sunday, it may have been the last time it was open to the public with temporary exhibits for which it is well known and with a full curatorial staff, The Boston Globe reported.
May 18, 2009
The Apollo Group, the parent company of the University of Phoenix, is considered a purchase of BPP, the only for-profit higher education entity in Britain with degree-granting authority, The Times Higher reported. Both government officials and educators in Britain view the potential purchase as significant, as it could be a springboard for Apollo's ambitions in the country.
May 18, 2009
For most of the academic year that just ended, Lambuth University has experienced administrative turnover and evidence of severe financial problems. Now, for the second month in a row, the university has failed to make payroll on time, The Jackson Sun reported.
May 18, 2009
The former girlfriend of Mike Burden -- until recently associate head coach of the University of Maine men's basketball team -- says she warned the university that he posed a danger unless he received counseling, The Bangor Daily News reported. Burden resigned last week after being charged with unlawful sexual conduct with one woman and assault against another who was trying to help the first woman.
May 18, 2009
A statue of President James A. Garfield was decapitated last week, shortly after it was placed in a prominent location at Hiram College. The Record-Courier reported that the statue dates to 1914, and was recently brought to the campus after a trustee found it. The statue was placed in front of the college's Garfield Institute for Public Leadership, and the head was apparently removed sometime between 10 p.m. Thursday and 9 a.m. Friday. The Record-Courier article features before and after photographs.
May 18, 2009
Just after the last diploma was presented Saturday at the commencement of Green Mountain College, a small group of students streaked across the stage, with bandanas or masks as their only clothing, The Rutland Herald reported. While audience members -- especially trustees on stage who received the best views -- appeared surprised, the newspaper suggests that perhaps they should not have been. Streakers appeared last year so it appears that this may be a tradition in the making.
May 15, 2009
The College Board is postponing plans to introduce a standardized test for eighth graders -- a test that the board said would promote rigor in high school and that critics said wasn't justified educationally but was just a money-making tool for the organization. The College Board announced plans for the new exam -- ReadiStep -- in October.
May 15, 2009
Most states that have already decided how to allocate the education funds they're receiving from the federal stimulus package are directing the bulk of the money to elementary and secondary education, according to an analysis of 13 states by the New America Foundation.
May 15, 2009
Larry Nielsen has resigned as provost of North Carolina State University, saying that a controversy over his hiring of the former governor's wife was making it impossible for him to do his job, The Raleigh News & Observer reported. Many have been critical not only of the hiring of Mary Easley to coordinate some special events for the university, but also her salary -- $850,000 over five years -- at a time of budget constraints.

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