Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

July 30, 2009
Can a piece of narrative history inspired by a Hollywood screenplay be real history? That's the question raised by a dispute involving dueling accounts of the Civil War secession of a Mississippi county, The New York Times reports.
July 30, 2009
Federal study finds that those who specialize in science and technology fields in college are disproportionately male and Asian, and more likely than peers to earn a degree.
July 29, 2009
In drafting 2010 spending bill for education and health programs, U.S. Senate panel de-emphasizes priorities (such as Pell Grants and biomedical research) that fared well in economic stimulus measure.
July 29, 2009
Responding to a request by lawmakers supportive of the guaranteed student loan program, the Congressional Budget Office has released a letter arguing that President Obama's plan to make all loans out of the government's direct loan program would save the Treasury less money than the administration suggests. The letter, requested by Sen.
July 29, 2009
Lawrence Eppley, a University of Illinois trustee who is among those found to have urged the admission of politically connected applicants, is resigning from the board and urging others to do the same, the Chicago Tribune reported.
July 29, 2009
President Obama on Tuesday nominated David S. Ferriero to become the next archivist of the United States. Groups of historians and archivists have been urging the president to pick someone with substantial experience in managing large library collections and Ferriero has such a background. He is currently the Andrew W. Mellon Director of the New York Public Library, and he previously led its research libraries division.
July 29, 2009
Carleton University, in Ottawa, announced Tuesday that it has replaced a professor teaching an introductory sociology course who is facing extradition to France, where authorities have accused him of a role in a deadly 1980 bombing of a synagogue, The Canadian Press reported. News that Hassan Diab -- who maintains his innocence -- was teaching at Carleton became public Monday, leading to criticism of the university.
July 29, 2009
The College Art Association has filed a brief -- prepared by the National Coalition Against Censorship -- with the U.S. Supreme Court, urging the justices to back a lower court's ruling finding unconstitutional a federal law barring depictions of certain kinds of animal cruelty. The association argues that artists and professors who create or use artistic materials could be charged with breaking the law.
July 28, 2009
A foundation created and led by Henry Louis Gates Jr. is amending its federal tax form after questions were raised about $11,000 paid to foundation officers -- funds that the original tax form called research grants, but that should have been classified as compensation, ProPublica reported.
July 28, 2009
Three members of the board of the Rose Art Museum of Brandeis University are suing the university to block any plans to sell its world-class art collection, valued in the hundreds of millions of dollars, The Wall Street Journal reported. Plans by Brandeis to sell the collection set off widespread protests by artists and scholars, at Brandeis and elsewhere. The university says it is re-evaluating its plans, but many supporters of the museum are dubious.

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