Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

March 6, 2009
The editorial staff of the Oregon Daily Emerald, which went on strike Wednesday in protest of organizational changes, plans to return to work and publish a newspaper today, the newspaper announced Friday.
March 6, 2009
The ex-professor and professor whose separate appearances on the college lecture circuit regularly cause controversies appeared together Thursday night -- to still more controversy. William Ayers -- the University of Illinois at Chicago professor who is regularly attacked for his past in the Weather Underground -- traveled to the University of Colorado at Boulder to speak with and on behalf of Ward Churchill, who lost his job teaching there when the university determined that he had engaged in repeated incidents of scholarly misconduct.
March 6, 2009
New York authorities on Thursday charged that the son of a University of Chicago professor engaged in identity theft and harassment of scholars with whom his father has a long-standing disagreement about the Dead Sea Scrolls, The New York Times reported. Raphael Golb is accused of creating e-mail accounts in which he pretended to be his father's scholarly critics, and of using those accounts to advance his father's theories.
March 6, 2009
Unlike (relative) drama of 2007 negotiations over accreditation, panel now debating changes in federal rules focuses on the mostly mundane.
March 5, 2009
This week at Dartmouth College started with the announcement that Jim Yong Kim would become the next president. The choice was well received on campus, while Asian American educators nationally hailed the news because Kim will expand the very small pool of Asian American presidents and will be the first one to lead an Ivy League institution.
March 5, 2009
More white scholars are teaching black studies, and they are finding students (themselves more likely than in the past to include non-black students) more accepting, the Los Angeles Times reported. A Northwestern University professor quoted in the story says: "There probably are students who wouldn't enroll in a black studies course with a white professor.... But it's my view that students are incredibly open-minded.
March 5, 2009
Officials of the University of Texas at Austin may have a new way to convince legislators to do away with the "10 percent" admissions law: football. The law, adopted as a means to promote diversity, assures admission to any public institution to anyone in the top 10 percent of a Texas high school's graduating class. Because so many of those students enroll at Austin, officials there say that they have lost too much flexibility in admissions decisions.
March 5, 2009
Studies of endowments don't bring good news these days. College endowments in the United States lost an average of 24.1 percent in the last six months of 2008, according to a survey from Commonfund Institute that provides an update on an estimate the organization released two months ago. As is typically the case, the largest endowments did better than smaller endowments. Those with more than $1 billion saw average losses of only 21.7 percent.
March 5, 2009
Rebecca S. Chopp, president of Colgate University, in New York, has been selected as president of Swarthmore College, in Pennsylvania. Rick Ostrander, interim vice president for academic affairs at John Brown University, in Arkansas, has been chosen as provost and chief academic officer at Cornerstone University, in Michigan.G.P.
March 4, 2009
Some students are challenging the truthfulness of Elsa Murano, president of Texas A&M University, over questions of when she made a job offer, The Bryan-College Station Eagle reported. Murano told student leaders last year that she wouldn't offer anyone the job of vice president for student affairs without consulting them first. But students, using open records laws to obtain the documents, found a job offer had been extended before Murano made that pledge.

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