Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

March 23, 2010
The Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences on Monday sued its former president, Karen Pletz, accusing her of submitting fraudulent expense forms, The Kansas City Star reported. A statement from the university says that as much as 70 percent of the expenses Pletz filed were false -- ranging from lunch at McDonald's to expensive dinners. Pletz has not responded, but news of her dismissal in December stunned Kansas City educators and business leaders, who at the time widely praised her.
March 23, 2010
The negative reviews have started for a student play at Tarleton State University even though the critics haven't seen the production. The Fort Worth Star-Telegram reported that Christian groups are mad that the university has allowed students to put on Corpus Christi, a Terrence McNally work that depicts Jesus as gay and has him perform a gay marriage.
March 23, 2010
Stanford University is talking up a new model of engineering education, with less emphasis on traditional courses and more focus on solving big problems such as global warming, The San Francisco Chronicle reported.
March 23, 2010
The Common Application continues to grow -- on Monday announcing an additional 25 members, bringing the total number of colleges to 414. While the program was originally most popular among private liberal arts colleges, the new members reflect a broadening of membership. With the addition of the University of Connecticut and the University of Michigan, the program now has flagships from 10 states. And the addition of Columbia University means that the entire Ivy League is signed up.
March 23, 2010
For the second time this month, students have organized a major event in California to draw attention to state budget cuts to higher education. Unlike the earlier protest, which involved rallies throughout the state, Monday's event focused on Sacramento, where community college students attracted thousands to demand more state support.
March 23, 2010
New York University is planning a major expansion, with the goal of increasing its physical capacity by 40 percent over the next 20 years, The New York Times reported. The expansion would take place at NYU's main campus in Greenwich Village and elsewhere in the city.
March 23, 2010
Everyone has a bracket these days. Stuart Rojstaczer, a former Duke University professor who documents and campaigns against grade inflation, unveiled a bracket in which he selected athletic conference members that have made it tough to earn an A.
March 23, 2010
The University of Memphis has failed to persuade a National Collegiate Athletic Association appeals panel that penalties imposed on the institution's men's basketball and women's golf programs were excessive.
March 22, 2010
The North Carolina State Board of Community Colleges on Friday affirmed the right of students who do not have legal documentation to reside in the United States to enroll at community colleges (at out-of-state tuition rates), The Raleigh News & Observer reported.
March 22, 2010
Stanford University's medical school, known for tough conflict of interest rules for faculty members, will strengthen them further today, The New York Times reported. The additional rules will apply to hundreds of local physicians who teach at Stanford, and will subject these adjunct faculty members to the same restrictions as full-time medical professors.

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