Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

September 22, 2009
The Carnegie Corporation of New York is honoring four college presidents with "academic leadership" grants of $500,000 each to support academic initiatives at their institutions. The winners are: Leon Botstein of Bard College, Scott Cowen of Tulane University, Amy Gutmann of the University of Pennsylvania, and William E. Kirwan of the University System of Maryland.
September 21, 2009
Malcolm Casadaban, a professor of molecular genetics at the University of Chicago, died recently from an infection linked to the plague, which he was studying, the Chicago Tribune reported. He was doing research on a weakened laboratory strain of the bacteria Yersinia pestis. University officials said that they believed that no others are in any danger.
September 21, 2009
The board of Florida Keys Community College will meet today and may fire Jill Landesberg-Boyle as president, The Miami Herald reported. The board has already restricted her ability to fire anyone. In two years in office, she has won praise from many -- and appears to have strong backing from current faculty members -- for improving academic programs, finding additional funds for projects and beautifying the campus.
September 21, 2009
Looking to broaden H1N1 awareness on campuses, two U.S. cabinet members and a researcher from the Centers for Disease Control hosted a Friday afternoon conference call for college newspaper reporters and editors. Arne Duncan, secretary of education, and Kathleen Sebelius, secretary of health and human services, outlined the guidance their departments released last month on how higher education should prevent and handle outbreaks. Sebelius said vaccine distribution to colleges and universities in October.
September 21, 2009
The board of Missouri Southern State University has renewed the contract of Bruce Speck, the president, and also told him he must improve his relations with faculty members, The Joplin Globe reported. Board leaders said that they were aware of the plans of faculty leaders to call a vote of no confidence, and wanted to see faculty-administrator relations improved.
September 21, 2009
The State University of New York at Geneseo is allowing early decision applicants this year to decide whether or not to submit SAT or ACT scores.
September 21, 2009
That too many young people come out of high school ill-prepared for college or the work force is little disputed. The questions of why that's so and how to fix the situation, however, have too often resulted in finger pointing, with many college faculty members complaining that high schools are asking too little of their students and high school officials saying that colleges send mixed signals about what they want students to be able to do.
September 18, 2009
Legislation to reshape loan programs and bolster Pell Grants and community colleges passes along partisan lines. Now focus shifts to the Senate.
September 18, 2009
Princeton University on Thursday announced a review of its relationship with eating clubs, which are beloved by many of their alumni but are seen by many others as representing an exclusionary era.
September 18, 2009
The Faculty Senate at Radford University, in Virginia, voted Thursday to condemn the layoffs of two student services officials -- and the university president said that the layoffs "should not have happened," The Roanoke Times reported. The two officials were told that they had hours to leave their jobs -- even though they were highly regarded by students and professors.

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