Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

August 24, 2009
Beware the powerful legislator who feels ignored by higher education. In Indiana, Sen. Luke Kenley, chair of the Budget Committee, criticized Indiana and Purdue Universities over tuition increases, asking them to scale them back in light of the recession. Nothing happened. Senator Kenley's response? He's now threatening to use his committee's role to delay $53 million in construction projects at the universities, The Indianapolis Star reported.
August 24, 2009
While more college athletes who are gay have come out in recent years, they have not included big-time football players. But a survey of 85 football players in ESPN magazine found that just under half know a gay teammate, and that the number increases to 70 percent in the Pacific-10 conference.
August 24, 2009
Authorities in Germany are investigating about 100 professors involved in possible bribery to help students obtain their Ph.D.'s, the Associated Press reported. Hundreds of doctoral students may have been involved, although it is unclear whether they knew about the bribes. Authorities say that the students were paying money to a company that promised to help them with their doctorates, and that this company in turn paid the professors.
August 24, 2009
Education Department proposes regulations on year-round Pell Grants, colleges' reporting to consumers, illegal file sharing and other scattershot topics.
August 21, 2009
Looking back, financial aid administrators' choice of Phil Day as president was clearly a mistake. But was it one that could have been avoided?
August 21, 2009
The University of Texas, which has been criticized for multi-million dollar bonuses for some endowment managers, has revised its system for paying the bonuses, Bloomberg reported. The new plan limits bonuses in good years and also cuts payouts when the endowment loses money.
August 21, 2009
The National Science Foundation on Thursday announced rules that would require colleges and universities receiving funds from some of its programs to certify that they have programs in place to promote "responsible and ethical conduct of research to undergraduate students, graduate students, and postdoctoral researchers participating in the proposed research project.'' The rules do not set up a system for the NSF to review those programs, just a requirement that colleges and universities say they have the programs
August 20, 2009
Despite the economic downturn, 67 percent of parents believe in their ability to meet the cost of their children's college education, according to a poll being released today by Sallie Mae and Gallup. However, there are less encouraging signs too. In the last year, the percentage of parents "extremely worried" that the value of their savings and investments would be low increased to 31 percent from 17 percent. Parents also remain worried about tuition increases, the poll found.
August 20, 2009
The recently rediscovered mental health records of Seung-Hui Cho, the 2007 Virginia Tech killer, were released Wednesday, providing little insight into how he turned into a mass murderer, The Washington Post reported. The records indicate that he was never treated at the university's counseling center, despite a judge's order that he get treatment there.
August 20, 2009
Michael Cox, professor of music theory and composition at Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary's School of Church Music since 1990, has taken early retirement, rather than ending his membership in Broadway Baptist Church in Fort Worth, as he would have had to do to continue to teach, the Associated Baptist Press reported.

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