Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

August 21, 2009
Looking back, financial aid administrators' choice of Phil Day as president was clearly a mistake. But was it one that could have been avoided?
August 21, 2009
The University of Texas, which has been criticized for multi-million dollar bonuses for some endowment managers, has revised its system for paying the bonuses, Bloomberg reported. The new plan limits bonuses in good years and also cuts payouts when the endowment loses money.
August 21, 2009
The National Science Foundation on Thursday announced rules that would require colleges and universities receiving funds from some of its programs to certify that they have programs in place to promote "responsible and ethical conduct of research to undergraduate students, graduate students, and postdoctoral researchers participating in the proposed research project.'' The rules do not set up a system for the NSF to review those programs, just a requirement that colleges and universities say they have the programs
August 20, 2009
Despite the economic downturn, 67 percent of parents believe in their ability to meet the cost of their children's college education, according to a poll being released today by Sallie Mae and Gallup. However, there are less encouraging signs too. In the last year, the percentage of parents "extremely worried" that the value of their savings and investments would be low increased to 31 percent from 17 percent. Parents also remain worried about tuition increases, the poll found.
August 20, 2009
The recently rediscovered mental health records of Seung-Hui Cho, the 2007 Virginia Tech killer, were released Wednesday, providing little insight into how he turned into a mass murderer, The Washington Post reported. The records indicate that he was never treated at the university's counseling center, despite a judge's order that he get treatment there.
August 20, 2009
Michael Cox, professor of music theory and composition at Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary's School of Church Music since 1990, has taken early retirement, rather than ending his membership in Broadway Baptist Church in Fort Worth, as he would have had to do to continue to teach, the Associated Baptist Press reported.
August 20, 2009
Most college financial aid officers oppose the Obama administration's plan for expanding but significantly altering the Perkins Loan Program, according to a survey released Wednesday by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators.
August 20, 2009
Brandeis University has settled a lawsuit challenging its ability to replace a science building. The Wall Street Journal reported that Brandeis has agreed to name a lab after the donor of the building slated for demolition. That donor was the great uncle of a man who sued, arguing that in accepting the donor's funds, Brandeis had agreed to maintain a building named in the donor's honor.
August 20, 2009
Gov. Steve Beshear, Democrat from Kentucky, recently appointed a colleague with a rather checkered past to the Board of Directors of the West Kentucky Community and Technical College, in Paducah.
August 19, 2009
In this budget year, many faculties (unionized or not) have been asked by administrations to accept salary cuts or freezes or other modifications of their work arrangements. The Collective Bargaining Congress of the American Association of University Professors issued a statement Tuesday urging faculty groups to resist such calls -- unless they receive more power in shaping the direction of their institutions.

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