Doug Lederman

Doug Lederman, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Scott Jaschik, he leads the site's editorial operations, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Doug speaks widely about higher education, including on C-Span and National Public Radio and at meetings around the country, and his work has appeared in The New York Times and USA Today, among other publications. Doug was managing editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education from 1999 to 2003. Before that, Doug had worked at The Chronicle since 1986 in a variety of roles, first as an athletics reporter and editor. He has won three National Awards for Education Reporting from the Education Writers Association, including one in 2009 for a series of Inside Higher Ed articles he co-wrote on college rankings. He began his career as a news clerk at The New York Times. He grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated in 1984 from Princeton University. Doug lives with his family in Bethesda, Md.

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Most Recent Articles

October 14, 2009
The Bill and Melinda Gates and Ford Foundations are throwing their weight -- and a combined $6.1 million -- behind a set of programs at Washington State's community colleges that are designed to increase college completion.
October 14, 2009
Nikole Churchill was crowned as Miss Hampton University this month, a victory that was seen by some as significant because Churchill is not black and Hampton is a historically black university. Churchill wrote a letter to President Obama about both her win and concerns that "my crowning was not widely accepted" and that many "negative comments" have been made on the campus because she is not black.
October 14, 2009
Brandeis University on Tuesday agreed not to sell any artwork donated by three individuals suing the university to block a controversial plan -- already on hold -- to sell the noted collection of modern art, The Boston Globe reported. Further, the university agreed to give notice of 30 days to the state's attorney general before selling art donated by others.
October 14, 2009
A federal jury has awarded $435,678 to a Massachusetts executive who says he was deceived by the University of Pennsylvania into thinking a master of technology management program he enrolled in and completed was affiliated with the Wharton School, The Philadelphia Inquirer reported. University officials declined to comment, but have denied wrongdoing.
October 14, 2009
State of Wisconsin agrees to award financial aid to students at small Christian university, reversing previous decision based on institution's accrediting status.
October 13, 2009
In proposed research center, for-profit college leaders seek ways to answer fundamental question: Do their institutions expand access or exploit students?
October 13, 2009
The University of Texas System announced Monday that it would study the possibility of merging its San Antonio campus and its separate Health Science Center, which is in the same city. System officials said they had appointed a panel of national and local experts to decide whether the two institutions would be stronger as one or if they would be better off continuing to collaborate.
October 13, 2009
Bobby Lowder has long been a controversial trustee of Auburn University, seen by many as exercising too much control over the institution and its football program. But now there are questions being raised because Lowder's business reputation -- in theory part of the expertise he brought to Auburn's board -- is being challenged.
October 13, 2009
A California judge has ordered the state to stop considering race and ethnicity in a scholarship program for students entering the health professions. The judge ruled that the program could not, under the state's Proposition 209 ban on consideration of race and ethnicity, consider minority status. The judge did rule that the state could favor applicants who are economically disadvantaged. The Pacific Legal Foundation brought the case on behalf of a woman who was denied a scholarship.
October 13, 2009
A national study has found that officials at George Washington University tweet more than those of any other campus. The study analyzed Twitter accounts of university administrators acting in official capacities, not those of students. George Washington officials tweet an average of 57.7 times a day. GW was followed by the University of Washington (49.8) and the University of Florida (45.8).

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